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Severely Maladjusted

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About Severely Maladjusted

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  1. I'm considering this suggestion, but if he doesn't reply on his own, woulndn't that indicate that he's not interested? I suppose there would be nothing wrong with a polite phone call, but I might expect a negative response.
  2. Dear (Company President), I am contacting you to re-explore the possibility of working for (Company Name). As you know, I was unable to fulfill my commitment to you last year. It has been an immense regret, and I apologize for taking your time. Although I was always enthusiastic about the position, at the time of my last hiring, I was preoccupied with a worrisome health issue, which I kept to myself, that weighted heavily on my mind and contributed to my uncertainty. I know you have a business to run, and I understand why you withdrew the offer. Looking back with the clarity of hindsight, the question of my health was not serious enough that it should have prevented me from taking the job. The truth is that I allowed myself to be needlessly inhibited by fear. The total sum of the circumstances—the stress of relocating alone to a strange place for a demanding new job when I was already feeling trepid—led me to question whether I was making the right decision. I realize that it may be too late now, but I still have a strong desire to sell (Comany Name's) investment products. If you are willing to give me another chance, I am confident in my readiness to undertake the task at this time. I still possess the attributes that you originally hired me for: a passionate belief in (Company Owner's) message, a thorough understanding of his investment strategy, and the ability to successfully promote it. The sales training I received is still very fresh in my mind, and my confidence in my sales acumen and securities knowledge are better than ever. Most importantly, I am completely over any uncertainty. I know I let you down before, but I'd like to make it up to you by bringing money into the bank. Please let me know if you are interested in discussing this further. And thank you for taking the time to read this letter. Sincerely, Exceedingly Well Adjusted
  3. Thank you very much for all of the suggestions, especially the edits.
  4. The company is located outside of the coutnry and we never met face to face the first time, so I guess not. It's a highly unconventional arrangement.
  5. It's a small company and I'm reasonable certain that the same company President is still in charge of hiring.
  6. Last year I committed to a particular job that I was highly enthusiastic about, but for several reasons, uncertain whether it was right for me. After weeks of deliberateion, I ended up wavering at the last minute and let the opportunity slip. I posted about it here last May: http://forum.objecti...461#entry292574 I deeply regret that I did not take the job then and want to approach the employer and ask for another chance. I have no idea what my odds are, but I have nothing to lose by trying. I wrote a letter that I'm not quite satisfied with. I would greatly appreciate any feedback. ____________________ Dear (Company President), I am contacting you to re-explore the possibility of working for (Company Name). As you well know, I was unable to fulfill my commitment to you last year. It has been an immense regret, and I sincerely apologize for taking your time. Not that reasoning matters much, but I can offer that I did have a worrisome health issue, which I kept to myself, that weighed heavily on my mind and contributed to my uncertainty. I know you have a business to run, and I understand why you withdrew the offer. Looking back with the clarity of hindsight, the question of my health was not serious enough that it should have prevented me from taking the job. The truth is my own fear lead to me not following through on my commitment. The total sum of the circumstances—the stress of relocating alone to a strange place for a demanding new job when I was already feeling trepid—led me to lie awake many nights questioning whether I was making the “right” decision. What should have been an adventure turned into a troubling game of “what if…” Call it a young man’s insecurities more than anything. Even though I realize that it may be too late now, I still have a strong desire to sell (The Company's) investment products. If you are willing to give me another chance, I have overcome the fears that inhibited me last year and am confident in my readiness to act decisively at this time. I still possess the attributes that you originally hired me for: a passionate belief in (The Company Owner's) message, a thorough understanding of his investment strategy; and the ability to successfully promote it. The sales training I received is still very fresh in my mind, and my confidence in my sales acumen and securities knowledge are better than ever. Most importantly, I am completely over any uncertainty. This has been a humbling experience, but I have learned from it. Please let me know if you have any interest in discussing this matter further. And thank you for taking the time to read this letter. Sincerely, (Severely Maladjusted)
  7. So, I really need a job, but it's hard for me to get one due to lack of experience. My long-term goal is to work as a precious metals broker. It would help a lot to have some kind of sales/phone experience, or just any work experience. I recently applied at a debt collection agency -- not my idea of fun, but it's a start getting experience on the phones -- and they invited me for an interview. Only after setting one up for next week did I bother to look into the company, and I was a little bit disturbed by what I found: tons of reports from supposed debtors claiming that the company had come after them for debts that they didn't owe, used illegal collection tactics, and communicated with them in an abusive, threatening manner. There are reports from current and former employees claiming that the managers encourage all of the above and it's basically the scum of the receivables world. There are hundreds of complaints filed with agencies like the Better Business Bureau and the company is perpetually entangled in legal battles. It's possible that the reports are from people who are just disgruntled because they don't like being held responsible for their debts, or that the abusive acts are committed by a minority of "bad" employees. I also realize that whatever laws are getting the company in trouble are likely to be unfairly slanted toward debtors. If, as some reports claim, the company is intentionally coming after people for debts they don't owe, that would be a deal-breaker. I also don't think I have it in me to be abusive, rude or harassing toward people, although it would be difficult to know where to draw the lines. Ultimately, I guess I won't know exactly what's up unless I give it a try. What say you guys?
  8. I'm unemployed and have been for a long time. I'm reduced to a position where I have to take any job I can get just because it's a job. My odds of finding anything are disimal. But I don't just need work, I need some kind of productive purpose to give my life meaning. I've been inactive for so long that I now have no idea what that would even be. Looking throug the jobs on craigslsit, most of them are so purposeless and unfulfilling that, even if I could get them, I think I'd hate them so bad that I'd be unable to succeed at them. Meanwhile, Obama and Bernanke are committed to doing everything in their power to destroy the economy. As bad as things are, I'm certain they will get worse, possibly a lot worse. So it seems that my life is just going to be a drudgerous uphill battle to nowhere from now on. No purpose, no values, no happiness anywhere in sight. All there is to look forward to is applying for jobs that I don't want and then even if I get one, Obama is going to destroy the US dollar and wipe out the value of my wages. It's like what's the point anymore.
  9. From The VoS: "Man’s emotional mechanism works as the barometer of the efficacy or impotence of his actions. If severe and prolonged enough, the absence of a normal, active flow of value-experiences may disintegrate and paralyze man’s consciousness—by telling him that no action is possible." This has happened to me. How do I overcome this?
  10. I don't wanna name names, but if I did, I don't think anyone here would conclude I had gotten mixed up with a scammer.
  11. It's no scam - the owner of the company has an impeccable reputation and is considered a hero in free market circles.
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