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pittsburghjoe

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  1. When something doesn't have time, gravity, and 3D ..what makes you think spacetime is involved? I'm talking about QM objects when they are unobserved and are considered waves (the unobservable). Have you considered QM might not exist within the fabric of spacetime until observation? The Wave function wouldn't result in probabilities if it was possible to include spacetime. QM waves do not need anything from spacetime to continue existing. Entanglement is obviously not a property of Spacetime. Spooky action at a distance can happen because QM doesn't have time like we experience and the particles are likely connected via a QM wave that could stretch to infinity if needed. Abbe's diffraction limit is the cutoff we have been looking for. Anything smaller doesn't have to adhere to the laws of relativity. It's waves until it is observed. Observation seems to be a property of spacetime. When a ginormous star collapses on a single point, the force is so extreme that it causes a QM bubble to scale in Spacetime that does not have to adhere to the rules of the QM/Spacetime divide. Like typical QM objects, it can't be observed but can pull in anything close to it. When two black holes merge, it's just the QM bubble getting more massive. It would then make sense for dark matter to also be overgrown QM objects. Please tell me why you think spacetime is capable of performing quantum weirdness acts.
  2. Gravity is weak, because it's only as strong as it needs to be for spacetime. If our universe started from a black hole in another universe ..does the parent universe also have spacetime? Do our blackholes have spacetime?
  3. This is where I start going off the deep end: If Observation is a property of Spacetime and QM was here before the Big Bang ..what purpose does Spacetime serve? Was it artificially set by a god? Did a god figure out how to turn clumped together waves into spacetime? Is spacetime mostly flat because it took the first conscious being to initiate it? Are we here to entertain a god with nothing but time to waste? "God doesn't play dice" ..because he/she built spacetime above QM.
  4. Is abbe's diffraction limit also the limit to spacetime?
  5. The singularity appeared in an existing quantum field. You don't want to hear this, but I'm pretty sure our universe is in a black hole.
  6. Those events scream they have nothing to do with spacetime, so why are you refusing to let them go? I say let them be their own thing, they don't work with time or gravity anyways. I know what you are going to say: Your answer is built on a man-made excuse/mistake to include QM in spacetime. Yes, it has math going for it, but it isn't sharing what the reality is. Spacetime is under no obligation to include the scale of QM. QM existed before the big bang: https://phys.org/news/2019-05-stabilizing-no-boundary-universe-quantum.html You would think the next logical step is that QM isn't part of Spacetime. If you allow yourself to think of QM separated of Spacetime, you open a whole new avenue to science in general. Spacetime = classical/relativity QM = waves Our singularity (big bang) initiated in an existing Quantum Field of virtual particles. If everything in the beginning was waves, does it help explain the insane expansion rate right after the singularity? Spacetime didn't exist until after inflation? ..maybe when the singularly became large enough to be observed? Was the very first observable event the creation of Spacetime? This is about the half of QM that physicists don't like to talk about, when an object in superposition can only be described as math waves. The question of what matter is while in that state has chewed away at me for years. I think I found the answer; Quantum objects literally swap to waves when disconnected from Spacetime. Yes, that's right, I'm saying QM floats above the fabric of Spacetime. Observation grants quantum objects partial/temporary Spacetime. An unspecified/unknown number of chemically bounded atoms are always anchored to Spacetime. When we zoom into a large object, those atoms bonded together are not going to display quantum weirdness. If we separated a single atom from that object, it is suddenly too small to inhibit Spacetime. I knew it was losing a dimension of some type and originally assumed a 3D object was turning into 2D (something without depth is invisible to us) ..but then the math said it actually retains its 3D (u/racinreaver). It dawned on me that objects without Spacetime are also invisible to us. I then looked at the uncertainty principle and realized that the particle was not completely inhabiting Spacetime. If my hypothesis is correct, something should be strange about time for quantum objects ..and it is. Maybe something in superposition doesn't age. They won't ever find quantum gravity. I like to think doing an experiment that shows the Uncertainty Principle also shows a dimension not fully realized (wave isn't fully collapsed ..or doesn't fully possess the full dimension of Spacetime.) We are looking in the wrong place to quantize time and gravity. We should be able to find the QM/Spacetime divide by sending larger and larger groups of bonded atoms into an Uncertainty principle experiment, when groups with momentum stop being fuzzy, we will have our number. This will probably give new insights into virtual particles, dark energy, dark matter, and the big bang. It seems replicating my theory is the best approach to making a quantum computer: https://phys.org/news/2019-05-continuum.html I guess this will lead to the long sought theory of everything. Gravity is a property of spacetime. QM is not a property of spacetime. Gravity doesn't get involved until something is observable. Is spacetime mostly flat due to it not coming into being until after the big bang? Everything before that was quantum waves? Does the holographic principle only apply to QM? Anything going into a blackhole is likely becoming quantum sized. Could we say matter going in gets turned into quantum waves? Is that what dark matter is, large groups of unbonded atoms that are quantum waves? One day we will know the Quantum Wavelength that sits at the Quantum-Classical Boundary ..the line where Spacetime starts.
  7. There is a divide between QM and Spacetime. QM existed before the big bang: https://phys.org/news/2019-05-stabilizing-no-boundary-universe-quantum.html
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