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wynnbrando

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About wynnbrando

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  1. Very cool! I might commission a pair depending upon the quality of the actual shoe. I'm a businessman not an artist, but from a business perspective I would say: 1) you'll never make a million off of this type of thing, but could certainly supplement your income, and 2) your price point is way too low -- good custom must demand a much higher price -- don't sell yourself short if you ever try to really market your service.
  2. I'm not an expert. But from what I've heard from friends with law degrees (many), political science is a better undergrad than philosophy if you wish to go to law school. I would also reiterate whatever previous reply it was that said not to limit yourself too much as you move into college. From my experience, the first 1-2 years of undergrad are a great opportunity to really explore what you enjoy or do not enjoy and adjust accordingly. (I would say the same for the first 1-3 years of experience in the working world.) Have fun!
  3. All major banks have used this practice for a while. Several are now changing it as the federal government and FDIC are threatening increased regulation of overdraft fees. (Thank goodness the government is here to rescue you from the big, evil banks!) Over the past 10 years, about half of major retail banking revenues have come from fees as opposed to the more traditional interest on loans. You claim extortion and sound like all the consumer advocate groups lobbying for government intervention to protect the poor people that can't understand or think for themselves. It's not extortion; it's free markets. If you don't like it (and I wouldn't if I were you), either manage your money better or take your business somewhere else.
  4. Compatibility. This encompasses everything from fundamental values to whether you wipe down the bathroom sink after you use it. It's not terribly romantic, but compatibility in a very practical sense really does matter when you're talking about sharing a life with someone day after day for 50+ years. I would also say that, at least for me, having someone with a complimentary personality as opposed to one very similar to my own is important. I would constantly butt heads if I had to live with someone exactly like me!
  5. Welcome. As you explore these new ideas, try to keep in mind that Objectivism is not just about politics. It all starts with the individual, and a lot of the benefits and good stuff will have to do with how you live your own life. Have fun.
  6. The previous posts make some great points. I would reiterate the fact that Objectivism is not just political philosophy. These days it seems like that is the most common arena for the discussion of its ideas, but it does all start and the ideas are most powerful with the individual. If you're interested in sharing with and motivating other people, I feel the best way to do it, as with most things, is to lead by example. If you are a calm, confident, happy individual filled with self-esteem, certainty, and a benevolent worldview, people will respect and want to listen to what you have to say. Ask pointed questions that make people think about their own views, lives, and ideas from a different perspective instead of preaching. The characters in Atlas Shrugged are superb examples of this. The 'brand' of Objectivists should be simply individuals that love and enjoy life. That is at the root of the philosophy and where the learning and understanding of Objectivism should begin.
  7. Lots of good advice here. I've found that most self-doubt and esteem issues all stem from guilt. Work on constantly trying to identify feelings of guilt and where they come from. Guilt is usually the by-product of expectations established by various externalities (parents, friends, society, a religious upbringing, etc) that have nothing to do with you as an individual and what you want out of life. This is a long process, but a life free of guilt is possible. I would also second a previous reply regarding the importance of taking action now. Get in the habit of constantly taking action. Do something. Getting bogged down in existencial tail-chasing is a recipe for unhappiness. Take action.
  8. I understand what the original poster is trying to say and think it is a legitimate point to make. And I think he brought it up in a constructive way. A couple of the replies have illustrated what he is getting at here (like condemnation for the use of the pronoun 'we'). Thanks to the original poster.
  9. Tolstoy's 'War and Peace' is a classic for a reason. Cormac McCarthy novels are good.
  10. Some of the previous posts have pretty much answered the question. People that knowingly harm others will always exist and need to be dealt with (be it a justice system or a shotgun). But this has nothing to do with free markets. A couple other points that would likely come up in the referenced discussion: A capitalist economy would in fact create an environment in which 'buyer beware' and personal/corporate reputation were of more emphasis. But this isn't a bad thing. Free markets have a business cycle that includes periods of growth and recession. That's a fact. During a recession, employment will fall, output will decrease, and times will be tougher for people. All the recent attacks on free markets basically revolve around the fact that recessions suck and that means markets failed. When in reality the market is working exactly as it is supposed to -- adjusting prices and output until back in equilibrium. No one likes a recession, but it comes with a free market -- the market that has brought people amazing, unprecedented growth and quality of life improvements. Some of the previous posts have pretty much answered the question. People that knowingly harm others will always exist and need to be dealt with (be it a justice system or a shotgun). But this has nothing to do with free markets. A couple other points that would likely come up in the referenced discussion: A capitalist economy would in fact create an environment in which 'buyer beware' and personal/corporate reputation were of more emphasis. But this isn't a bad thing. Free markets have a business cycle that includes periods of growth and recession. That's a fact. During a recession, employment will fall, output will decrease, and times will be tougher for people. All the recent attacks on free markets basically revolve around the fact that recessions suck and that means markets failed. When in reality the market is working exactly as it is supposed to -- adjusting prices and output until back in equilibrium. No one likes a recession, but it comes with a free market -- the market that has brought people amazing, unprecedented growth and quality of life improvements.
  11. I would answer that the premise in the question -- that it would be easier and more profitable to withhold a cure -- is not correct. A cure for a disease would be extremely profitable -- because the market would price it to ensure that was the case. As for long term payments, like any large purchase, long term financing would likely develop as an option. A 'job security' mindset in which a company strives for imperfection would not last long in a free market economy. Somebody would quickly put them out of business. That's the beauty and efficacy of capitalism. Monopolies can occur naturally in a free market, but they are seldom and temporary. There will always be a price and profit threshold that would induce new entries into a market and innovation will eventually make a monopoly insignificant. (Think traditional phone service vs cell phones and vonage.) Pharmaceuticals certainly has a large barrier to entry, but it continues to be an extremely competitive market.
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