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TheAleph

A Humble Introduction

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Hello.

Let me first thank you for taking the time to read this. I understand that none of you have any obligations to entertain me.

I have recently joined the OO.net community and have thoroughly enjoyed reading the different ideas/posts thus far. You can most certainly look forward to some of my own input in the near future. Those who know me have deemed me a recluse, an anti-social, an egotist and a general hater of mankind. I respectfully disagree, not in the accusations themselves, but in what those accusations imply. I am 23, male, and a recent graduate from a University in Florida, US. There I double majored in the academic study of Art History and Religious Studies, with a minor in English. I was a celebrated scholar and have been published in both academic and creative writing journals. My focus was Medieval and Romanesque Art/Architecture, but I dabbled in the Northern Renaissance as well. I am an athiest (although I was raised Catholic), but became one of the top Biblical scholars of my university, and was even mentored by one of the few people in the country that can read both ancient hebrew and greek. I have since finished my studies but hope to continue them again in graduate school. My handle is from a short story by Jorge Luis Borges, and I have come to adopt a similar search for it's existence in my own adventures.

I first came to know Objectivism (like many of you, assumingly) through the literature and philosophy of Ayn Rand. My introduction to the philosophy came from The Fountainhead, a book I found while browsing my roommates bookshelf after exhausting my own collection. Her bookmark was early into the story, and I assumed that she had given up on the somewhat intimidating prose of the novel. Reading that book was a very unique experience for me. I had studied different philosophies throughout my explorations in academia, and found them interesting, or moving, or existential, or rational. But none of them were my own. Reading The Fountainhead was like learning more about myself the more I read. All the thoughts, opinions, ideas and actions I had endured throughout my life seemed to be collected, organized and given a narrative. I have since finished reading Atlas Shrugged, The Romantic Manifesto, and Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal.

I am not exactly sure of what I hope to gain from this community, I suppose it is human nature to migrate towards a group of common minded individuals. But even that seems counterintuitive. Best.

tl;dr: Hello.

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...I double majored in the academic study of Art History and Religious Studies, with a minor in English. I was a celebrated scholar and have been published in both academic and creative writing journals. My focus was Medieval and Romanesque Art/Architecture, but I dabbled in the Northern Renaissance as well. I am an athiest (although I was raised Catholic), but became one of the top Biblical scholars of my university, and was even mentored by one of the few people in the country that can read both ancient hebrew and greek.

Welcome! A fellow Art History major~

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Reading that book was a very unique experience for me. I had studied different philosophies throughout my explorations in academia, and found them interesting, or moving, or existential, or rational. But none of them were my own. Reading The Fountainhead was like learning more about myself the more I read.

I think you'll find you're in good company here. For me, it was a "THIS is what's wrong with the world, only I never knew how to express it."

I am not exactly sure of what I hope to gain from this community, I suppose it is human nature to migrate towards a group of common minded individuals. But even that seems counterintuitive.

Howard Roark sought out similarly competent traders (like Mike the electrician) to exchange values with. So long as you develop your own values, you can be an independent individualist just like the rest of us. :P Welcome to the forum!

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Thank you all for the warm welcome.

Hallo. I hope that "humble" is sarcastic. Humility is not a virtue.

Haha, nor is it something I'd ever hope to achieve. But if you found my post too modest I can most certainly elaborate on all of my sparkling qualities.

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Belated hello.

As for Humility, let us consult the good doctor.

“What I see in Nature is a magnificent structure that we can comprehend only very imperfectly, and that must fill a thinking person with a feeling of humility."

Albert Einstein

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