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CapitalistSwine

Cannabinoids Effects' on Cancerous Cells

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Hello everyone.

A short while back I finished a final paper for one of my college classes that revolves around Drug and Behavior psychology and medical science.

I mainly wrote on this subject because it was of personal interest to me and I used it as an opportunity to gain insight on the matter.

I just thought I would put this up here for anyone that may be interested in reading it. If not, that is fine.

(Please no critiques of the paper itself, if you wish to discuss the actual content however go right ahead)

Cannabinoids Effects' on Cancerous Cells

http://docs.google.com/Doc?docid=0Aa8pzZ_i...mRkYw&hl=en

Edited by CapitalistSwine

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Interesting, I enjoyed reading it. Nice research, I had read some speculative work on the infulence THC has on Cancerous cells, but this puts it forth clean and understandable way. (The previous work I mentioned being a royal mess)

It should be noted, however, that this should not be used as an argument for "Weed is good for you, dawg". To injest this Cannabinoids using other methods, sure, go for it. But to get them into your organism via smoking, I do not suggest doing.

It would be slightly ironic if a person smoked pot to fight Lung Carcinoma, and later, when the tumor was gone, he found out he had severely damaged his alveloi and cillia in the way :)

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Can you sum your paper's point up in one or two sentences?

If I could it wouldn't be a very good paper. Basically there has been extensive research showing the likeliness that cannabinoids and other THC components are and in the future, will be highly useful for both alleviation of current treatments as well as to be used as a co-prescription or even sole administration for various forms of cancer. It also shows much promise in helping with a number of other health and medical concerns.

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Interesting.  Most likely THC could prevent cancer likelihood because it supresses the immune system reducing inflammation which is why it is targeted as a drug for chronic inflammatory diseases and probably why there are some studies showing it reduces chances of alzheimer's disease.  It may reduce the proliferation of cancer cells in vitro but it is quite another thing what will happen in vivo in which cancers behave physiologically with the other organ systems.  Even then if it works in animals, it will be quite another thing whether it works in humans, all animals having metabolic features which differ across the board.  One reason it should be avoided is that suppression of the immune system means you are increasing your likelihood of infections which could result in serious illness.  It has long been known that psychotropic drugs suppress the immune system leaving pot heads susceptible to more infections than non-smokers.  It's just another example of how you cannot beat nature.  I'm starting to think that any unnatural molecule you put in the body will come with a trade off, and the weight of that trade off will increase the longer time period you are consuming any drug.  The effects of most illegal psychotropic drugs are not well studied and to the extent that they are, it is mostly not common knowledge in mainstream science and therefore doesn't trickle down to the public.  The best thing is to live a lifestyle that reduces the chances of any serious illness rather than rely on drugs to cure you when the time comes--after you have accumulated significant damage--that would be working with nature rather than against it.

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