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Edwin

Can one be a Freemason and remain an Objectivist?

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What if one declares the Supreme Being to be his own self?

Is everything else in Freemasonry aligned with Objectivism?

I ask this because based on a guess I have a feeling that Freemasonry requires it's members to stick to anti-Objectivist ideas like unchosen obligations towards others in the fraternity.

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I think declaring yourself to be god woudn't go over well with, well anyone.

Just a quck search on google revearled them to support altruistic causes (stress on charity and approval of others).

So no.

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What do you suppose is the point in demanding that a prospective member believe in a Supreme Being? (I think it is the commonly held view that personal morality is not possible without some super natural being watching over and holding the individual in awe with possible cosmic punishment.)

While seeking "the approval of others" certainly contradicts Objectivism; charity does not, nor would, necessarily, entering into a voluntary arrangement of mutual assistance (which was the original purpose of these fraternal, benevolent or mutual-aid societies).

These kind of organizations (freemasons, Odd Fellows, etc.) came into being at a time when commercial insurance providers did not have products for ordinary individuals. Until well into the nineteenth century, insurance was only obtainable by large enterprises (shipping concerns, etc.). But, now that you can get insurance services for things like life, health, home, travel, etc. for yourself and family, why would you feel a need to join one of these archaic and ridiculous organizations?

Remember that old '50s television program, The Honeymooners? Are you going to be like Ralph Kramden and his pal, Norton, members of ...what were they? Royal Order of Raccoons, was it? The stupid, humiliating rituals (...they're secret because they're so embarrassing...) and the secret hand signs? Pretty silly, right?

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If you want to join a mutual aid socieity credit unions and those community gardens still follow those sorts of models. Instead of people banding together to help one another, the Free Masons appear to be more paternalistic, like they are banding together to help non-members.

Edited by Hairnet

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Yes, you can be a Freemason and an Objectivist at the same time. There is no contradiction between the two. Freemasons are not a religious or political organization.

The "supreme being" requirement is loose and non-essential enough to be disregarded, and your obligations to other Masons are not unchosen. You choose them when you join, that's the whole point of joining.

As to the criticisms of the posters above me, Hairnet, charity is not an altruistic cause, and jm323, the OP asked a question about Objectivism, not your opinion on Freemasons and whether you find them silly or not.

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There appears to be no good reason to be a Freemason, though. If it's compatible with Objectivism in any sense has a lot to do with its stated purpose and intention. As far as I know, every lodge is unique.

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It might depend on the lodge. I think there is a separate group of Masons that come out of France (originally) that accept atheists. I've got a friend who says there is some amount of bible study in his lodge in Green Bay, WI. It seems secular enough when he explicitly says that they use the bible as a tool to explore moral questions and not as revealed truth. They've got Buddhists, Jews, etc. I even have another mason friend who I thought was an atheist. He's the type who probably was thinking of, "the God of Spinoza," when he joined.

Anyway, I'm sure I would feel dishonest if I joined. I don't think "supreme being" has any meaning.

Edit: Even if you get past the "God" question, you've still got to make sure the rest is compatible. You'd probably have to join to figure that out.

Edited by FeatherFall

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There appears to be no good reason to be a Freemason, though.

I don't personally know much about it, but if it works as advertised, then it's a secular, non-political means to socialize with respectable, dependable human beings. Sounds pretty great to me.

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Apparently you can...

"I underwent a lengthy and involved – and quite fascinating – initiation ritual. It was all explained very clearly and it made a lot of sense to me.

It’s not that the rituals are 'quasi-religious' – it’s more that they’re symbolic. And the symbols are good!" ~ PRODOS

http://prodos.thinke...im-a-freemason/

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Okay Nicky, this is where I got my information on Free Masonry.

http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/the-basic-principles-of-freemasons.html

Is this website not credible?

They aren't terrible people They sound exactly like an enlightment era organization, with all of its benefits and faults. They support liberty, pluralism,personal faith and morals, family, "democracy" , and human progress.

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I believe my career would better benefit from joining Opus Dei rather than the Freemasons, but I'm considering Chabad Lubavitch as well. So many options, it's like a fraternity for the after college life, or a gang for prison. Dn't you feel like the prettiest girl of the dance?

Considering Saint Balaguer Escriva founded the order to exalt the value of Laicism and role of Laic life during the times of the Rerum Novarum (modernity), and that they are a staunchly anticommunist bunch, I believe they might further my career without making me either do charity or recognize a supernatural power (after all the Pope is a simple mortal and Catholicism (like Bhudism) allows one to be an atheist sinner and still be regarded as just as pious as the next guy as long as you donate a little something tobeliev a monastery. I believe modern Universities took their idea of patronage from the old days of Cluny. Maybe that explains their choice in architecture.

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Free Masonry is attractive in many ways. Many of the Founding Fathers were members. But I think the fundamental religiosity and general belief in "service" makes this group untenable for Objectivists.

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