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Wotan

Ye Shiwen -- Olympic Champion Swimmer

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http://edition.cnn.c...file/index.html

To even hint at the possibility of doping here is pure racism. When it comes to foreigners, we should all just learn to shut our damn mouths. We need to militantly adhere to the noble social ideals of political correctness, multiculturalism, diversity, inclusion, democracy, and peace. Thus we should not breath a word about any possible doping here. Just because the Chinese have a long and terrible history of Olympic doping, as do all the other competing dictatorships, does not mean we should abandon our heroic Western ideals of dishonesty, cowardice, deliberate blindness, and general sleaze

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I'm less perturbed by her improvement compared to previous scores and moreso by the shattering of a world record. The idea that someone vastly improved themselves is easy to believe, the idea that someone was able to personally make that much physical progress compared to other professional athletes is rather strange.

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http://edition.cnn.c...file/index.html

To even hint at the possibility of doping here is pure racism. When it comes to foreigners, we should all just learn to shut our damn mouths

You should shut your damn mouth when it comes to Americans too, if you don't have any evidence. Even though American athletes also have a long history of doping.

And there are over a billion Chinese in the world. The line of thought by which whenever one of them excels in sport, that alone is reason enough to question their honesty, is pretty obvious racism.

Edited by Nicky

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Chinese Olympics: Slavery for the glory of sport. A more freedom-loving world would ban such countries from competing.

And if you consider being pumped with testosterone or steroids from a young age "doping", then it's unlikely you'll find a single Olympian representing China who hasn't been doped at some time in his/her past.

Edited by brian0918

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Chinese Olympics: Slavery for the glory of sport. A more freedom-loving world would ban such countries from competing.

And if you consider being pumped with testosterone or steroids from a young age "doping", then it's unlikely you'll find a single Olympiad representing China who hasn't been doped at some time in his/her past.

A few points:

1. Those pictures of child gymnasts are used out of context. I'm sure if someone was given a free pass into the training facilities of any top level olympic gymnastics program (be it in the US or Europe), they could snap similar photos. Gymnastics training is painful and repetitive, and done to children from an early age.

2. I haven't seen any evidence of doping by Ye Shiwen, in your article.

3. The suggestion that all Chinese athletes should be excluded from the Olympics, based on the facts presented in that article, is baffling to me. Most of the article is about East German doping, the rest about how Ye Shiwen looks. (Particularly, that she was originally accepted into a sports school because she had large hands and feet. What's next, complaining about basketball programs picking out kids because they're tall?)

And if other athletes getting caught doping is reason enough to exculde nations from the Olympics, the US should also be excluded.

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My reason for wanting them excluded wasn't the doping, just the fact that these kids are forcibly taken from their families and made to do this against their will.

Edited by brian0918

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My reason for wanting them excluded wasn't the doping, just the fact that these kids are forcibly taken from their families and made to do this against their will.

Which kids? Was Ye Shiwen forcibly taken from her family? Is she doing all this against her will?

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I don't know about her specific scenario, but I wouldn't see why it would be different from other Chinese Olympians. For one of the Chinese gymnasts, they mentioned he'd only seen his parents for 17 days in the last decade.

A quote from the parents of a Chinese diver:

“We never tell her what’s happening at home. We even kept the news that her grandparents died from her. When grandma died, (Wu) seemed almost like she had a premonition, and she called us asking if she was OK. We had to lie; we told her, ‘everything’s OK.’”

“It’s been like this for so many years. We long ago realized that our daughter doesn’t belong to us completely. Enjoying the company of family? I don’t think about it. I don’t dare think about it.

http://www.calgaryhe...6175/story.html

As for what is/isn't force - clearly these little children want to be with their parents and vice versa, so what is preventing them from doing so?

Edited by brian0918

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I don't know about her specific scenario, but I wouldn't see why it would be different from other Chinese Olympians.

Don't you think you should find out about her specific scenario, before calling for her to be barred from competing?

As for what is/isn't force - clearly these little children want to be with their parents and vice versa, so what is preventing them from doing so?

If you want to discuss whether someone is being forced into something, the first order of business should be deciding what is and what isn't force. For instance, nothing described in either of the two articles you posted so far is force.

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Don't you think you should find out about her specific scenario, before calling for her to be barred from competing?

What possible fact could exist about her specific scenario to override what the Chinese government has done to her and countless others over their entire childhoods?

If you want to discuss whether someone is being forced into something, the first order of business should be deciding what is and what isn't force. For instance, nothing described in either of the two articles you posted so far is force.

Then answer my second question: what is preventing these families who want to be together from being together?

Edited by brian0918

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