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ARI Ironic Humor

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Ayn Rand put the Kent Lansing statements in context. It's about creative genius fighting against mediocrity and in the end it must triumph.

"There were many wealthy men involved and the corporation was ruled by a numerous board." "Wealthy men"- meaning not their primary occupation or they got their money from inheritance and "numerous board" - top heavy, more of a social group.

Then Roark says about groups: "I can get along with people--when they're alone. I can do nothing with them in groups." Then the Kent quotes above.

What the board members says brings it home. "...how're you going to vote, do the big boys approve of him or not." "I'm not going to decide till I know who's voted for or against." "I don't like Roark's face--he doesn't look co-operative." " I know, I feel it, Roark's the kind that don't fit in. He's not a regular fellow." "Why? I don't know why. I just don't like it, and that's that. Haven't I got a right to an opinion of my own?"

In the end "At the end of July, Roark signed a contract to build the Aquitania."

And

When Ayn Rand created the Foundation for the New Intellectual in the sixties, it had a board.

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Someone's reading my post too seriously.  :confused:

'Twas only intended for a chuckle, not a condemnation.

By humoring a remarkable Intellectual Institute?

To quote Ayn Rand:

"Humor is a destructive element but its value and its morality depend on what it is that you are laughing at. To laugh at that which is good, at heroes, at values, and above all at yourself is monstrous... The worst evil you can do, psychologically, is to laugh at yourself. That means spitting in your own face."

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I have never heard that quote before, where is it from?

That particular quote is from a question period following Lecture 11 of Leonard Peikoff's series, "The Philosophy of Objectivism" in 1976 and is reprinted in The Ayn Rand Lexicon. If you're interested in reading more of what Ayn Rand thought about humor, though, she also discusses humor to some extent in The Romantic Manifesto and The Art of Fiction.

Keep in mind, however, that Ayn Rand's thoughts on humor are a very controversial subject right now as has been demonstrated by another post on the board in recent days.

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I was only curious in where the quote came from, because I sis not remember it from the Lexicon.

Keep in mind, however, that Ayn Rand's thoughts on humor are a very controversial subject right now as has been demonstrated by another post on the board in recent days.
I was not trying to take sides, the question was one of curiosity. By no means was I attempting to discredit Lu Norton's post.

Anyway, thank you for your help. :)

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