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dadmonson

Tips to beat Do-nothingism

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Share your tips on how to beat do-nothingism:

I'll start off...  Here is a remarkably simple way to stop procrastinating...  I can see a lot of folks here saying that it would never work but don't knock it until you try it'!  http://zenhabits.net/leggo/

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2 hours ago, Nicky said:
2 hours ago, Nicky said:

I have a tip for that: get a job.

 

Yeah, you're perfect Nicky you never procrastinate... not even in school you made straight A's did all your work on time and now you are at the top of your field!

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9 hours ago, dadmonson said:

Yeah, you're perfect Nicky you never procrastinate.

Actually, I procrastinate all the time. But I find that having a job makes it a lot easier to avoid procrastinating...since there's a lot of pressure to get things done, with immediate negative consequences when you don't. Hence my tip.

How you read into that that I'm perfect, is beyond me.

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I think a lot about motivation. Is it possible to have constant motivation? Theoretically, if everyday you find a different motivational video, reading, or quote that resonates with your soul, you should be motivated everyday? I haven't tried this myself.   I imagine it'll just get harder and harder to become motivated by such things but I don't know for sure.

Edited by dadmonson

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An occasional motivation video or reading might help pep you up. it does not even have to be specifically about motivation. It could be an inspiring biography or novel. However, all such things are not the meat and potatoes of motivation: that has to come from "real life". Something like a video or book might shake me from lethargy and make me commit to doing something: say, approaching my job in a different way, or looking for a new job. The true motivation (in that case) would have to come from the job itself.

Added: If the bulk of one's input is motivational stuff with almost no real motivational input via "real life", I guess it would be counter-productive and depressing. The motivational stuff will end up as a reminder that others seem to have all this motivation, and you do not.

Edited by softwareNerd

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