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Szalapski

Does contradiction with my flourishing life really make a value immoral?

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I am not sure how life can give values meaning or morality.  I'll start with an Objectivist example as follows. I value eating lots of doughnuts, but pursuit of this value is unhealthy and therefore contradictory to having a flourishing life.  I also value eating lots of lean protein, and pursuit of this value is healthy and generally contributes to a flourishing life.

That much is clear.  However, I am having trouble moving from "is" to "ought".  What if I want to indulge the unhealthy value? What if I decide that my short-term enjoyment is better--the emotions and the sensations I get from frequent doughnut treats is worth whatever unknown distant health drawback that might occur?  What makes the pursuit of this value immoral? Is it only that I am doing something that is contradictory to my life?

If so, does not subjectivism creep in?  After all, I cannot hope to judge that which is contradictory to my life, but only to judge my own compromised, biased, flawed understanding of what is contradictory to my life.

 

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9 hours ago, Szalapski said:

I am not sure how life can give values meaning or morality.  I'll start with an Objectivist example as follows. I value eating lots of doughnuts, but pursuit of this value is unhealthy and therefore contradictory to having a flourishing life.  I also value eating lots of lean protein, and pursuit of this value is healthy and generally contributes to a flourishing life.

That much is clear.  However, I am having trouble moving from "is" to "ought".  What if I want to indulge the unhealthy value? What if I decide that my short-term enjoyment is better--the emotions and the sensations I get from frequent doughnut treats is worth whatever unknown distant health drawback that might occur?  What makes the pursuit of this value immoral? Is it only that I am doing something that is contradictory to my life?

If so, does not subjectivism creep in?  After all, I cannot hope to judge that which is contradictory to my life, but only to judge my own compromised, biased, flawed understanding of what is contradictory to my life.

 

You state that you have read the virtue of selfishness.  If you understood it, you would not need to ask these particular questions.  All the answers to these are much more completely and eloquently discussed by that book than likely anyone here would be able to provide to you.

Your questions are meandering everywhere.  It might help to focus on something specific and foundational.  Where are the specific gaps in your understanding and why?

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55 minutes ago, StrictlyLogical said:

You state that you have read the virtue of selfishness.  If you understood it, you would not need to ask these particular questions.  All the answers to these are much more completely and eloquently discussed by that book than likely anyone here would be able to provide to you.

Your questions are meandering everywhere.  It might help to focus on something specific and foundational.  Where are the specific gaps in your understanding and why?

I'm not so sure Rand's writings are as clear, easy to follow, or as comprehensive as you say.  Could you at least point me to the chapter in TVoS that addresses this question that I might reread it and ponder?

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Introduction and chapter 1 "The Objectivist Ethics"

I suggest pondering first what is meant (don't get side tracked with criticism or disagreement in your own mind) i.e. identify what is meant and why first ... without deciding whether you agree as that can be very distracting if not disastrous during the process of understanding.  For motivation: I suggest you can never figure out whether you agree with something unless you can first understand fully what that something is.  I know it isn't easy but try to understand "the what" and "the why" first, then identify why things are an issue with your current knowledge.

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.

Patrick, how would having a power of judgment capable of errors make one’s judgment anything but a judgment requiring a judging subject? Would requiring-a-subject additionally make an activity subjective in the sense of not tracking reality?

Also, the sort of subjectivity I possess by my enjoyment of being in the woods alone is one sort. Wariness of wet stone in my hike requires my subjectivity in a very different sense.

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