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CartsBeforeHorses

An Eager Young Objectivst Who's Ready to Help Change the World

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Hi, what's up, this is CartsBeforeHorses, and I'm a 25-year-old Objectivist from Colorado Springs, Colorado. I'm a CPA (Certified Public Accountant) by trade. and in my spare time I enjoy cycling, video gaming, reading, and writing my novel. The novel I am working on is an Objectivism-inspired sci-fi novel that takes place in a world 1,000 years from now where man has been divided into three distinct races after centuries of genetic engineering.

Aside from that, I write Objectivist-themed blogs and videos to try to reach audiences that might not otherwise hear of our ideas. One such project should be completed by this weekend, and I will share once ready.

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9 hours ago, Reidy said:

Where can we see your blog?

Before I link it, a proper introduction to it is in order.

Objectivist blogs qua Objectivist blogs have little chance of changing the culture. Joe the Plumber doesn't really care about Objectivism. He does care about the culture, and he probably watches Football, South Park, The Late Show... and listens to bands like Coldplay, Chainsmokers, 21 Pilots, etc. I highly doubt that Joe the Plumber knows or cares about Atlas Shrugged or the classical music that Objectivists gravitate towards.

What if an Objectivist blog actually bothered to focus on Objectivist themes within existing, already-popular pop culture? It would probably have more success at getting people to think, than the 10,000th blog on why the welfare state is bad. Joe Blow would never search for or read that blog in the first place. A football blog, though? Maybe he would. And maybe if somebody bothered to make a video or a blog comparing the meritocracy on the sports field with capitalism, for instance (players as businessmen, rules as laws, referees as courts and judges) it might make him think.

Beginning in 2010, a children's cartoon took the internet by storm. Young adult males began watching it by the hundreds of thousands. The "Bronies," as they were known, were called losers, weirdos, geeks, all sorts of names under the sun by others who simply did not understand. How could a show, My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, based off of a little girls' toy, possibly resonate so far outside of its target demographic? Rather than view this as a mystery worth solving, most non-Bronies simply saw it as a weird thing. Obviously some people respected what show people wanted to watch, but they were in the minority.

The answer to the mystery is that the show presents certain virtues that are true and pure, and something about the show's sense of life struck them at a deeper level.

Concepts like, as I have addressed from an Objectivist perspective in my MLP blog...

The virtue of selfishness

Friendship based on mutual exchange of value

The proper conception of forgiveness, objective validation that a person has indeed changed from evil to good

Warning: I wasn't always an Objectivist, so reading my earlier blogs from 2013 or so might reveal my earlier philosophical inconsistency. But since about 2015 or so, I was a burgeoning Objectivist.

I have over 500 followers who are non-Objectivist, but spreading these ideas to them is, in my mind, far more valuable than just making another vanilla Objectivist blog on Blogger or someplace. I might do that someday, but for now I'm trying to change the culture directly.

Another project that I am working on, a YouTube video related to Sonic the Hedgehog, is described in detail here.

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