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RohinGupta

Need reviewers for my book, REINVENTING MANAGEMENT : ORGANIZATIONAL ETHICS FROM OBJECTIVISM

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Happy to announce that the project I was working on has reached a major milestone. It includes three books in the series. Initial draft and most of the revision is completed for the first book. Title of the book is REINVENTING MANAGEMENT : ORGANIZATIONAL ETHICS FROM OBJECTIVISM.

 I am looking for reviewers for the book. Attaching first two chapters here for reference. Please post your email id in comments, if you are willing to review. Or mail me at [email protected] 

From the perspective of Objectivist movement, here is essence of the book series.

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Following thought I think offers the foundation bedrock on how Objectivism should proceed in social context

 

The symbol of all relationships among [rational] men, the moral symbol of respect for human beings, is the trader. We, who live by values, not by loot, are traders, both in matter and in spirit. A trader is a man who earns what he gets and does not give or take the undeserved. A trader does not ask to be paid for his failures, nor does he ask to be loved for his flaws[14]. A trader does not squander his body as fodder or his soul as alms. Just as he does not give his work except in trade of material values, so he does not give the values in his spirit – his love, his friendship, his esteem – except in payment and in trade for human virtues in payment for his selfish pleasure, which he receives from a man he can respect. The mystic parasites who have, throughout the ages, reviled the traders and held him in contempt, while honoring the beggars and the looters, have known the secret motive of their sneers: a trader is the entity they dread – a man of justice.

 

GALT’S SPEECH,

FOR THE NEW INTELLECTUAL

 

SCOPE OF THE BOOK

 

The foundation thought from Galt’s speech is called Trader Principle.Going deeper into this thought, and other similar thoughts, there are two aspects to these. There is negative aspect, where the irrational relationships cannibalize rational men. Artistically, for this aspect we can recall Hank Rearden from Atlas Shrugged[15]. In Industrial context, an example of this are taxes for Altruistic reasons (You are your Brother’s Keeper).

 

And using those taxes to fund people who strangle your business through arbitrary regulations like Anti-Trust laws and Obamacare. Objectivist Politics, work in the field of Nature of Government[16] andIndividual Rights[17] specifically, focuses on this aspect of Trader Principle. Protecting rational man from initiation of Force by other members in society.

 

In this book however, I focus on other aspect of Trader Principle. How can rational man, or rational aspect of any person, benefit from other rational people in society? We explore answer to this question through Organizational Ethics. Extrapolating Objectivist code of values and virtues to Industrial setting. In Corporate setting (I use Industrial and Corporate interchangeably), Honesty for example can be data based decision making. Integrity can be policy based decision making. Just as science is related to Applied Science and technology. Similarly Ethics will be connected to Organizational Ethics.

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Chapter-1-Introduction-with-footnotes-Kindle-Optimized.pdf

Objectivist Ethics With Footnotes.pdf

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16 hours ago, softwareNerd said:

Who is the audience for this book?

 Here is the content from first chapter describing the intended audience.

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Specifically, regarding the kind of people who can benefit from this work. For people already applying Objectivism in their work and lives, I think this will deepen their understanding. Directing focus to more social aspects of their work lives also. Ayn Rand fans, who have read mostly her fiction, can get introduced to her ideas in a more structured form. Non-Objectivist intellectuals, even Politicians, Businessmen, and working people in general. Those who are not satisfied with status quo, but besides feeling and concrete instances, at a bigger picture level are unsure about what’s wrong in the work environments they operate in. These people can also benefit. In general, any adult willing to understand the culture he operates in should benefit.

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To summarize, Ayn Rand has rightly been identified as the philosopher of individual. The book shows her ideas can also be used for building collaborative institutions. Not very different from Rearden Steel or rational aspects of Taggart Transcontinental or Roark's office after he built Enright House.

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1 hour ago, RohinGupta said:

 Here is the content from first chapter describing the intended audience.

I asked the question because, after I read the introductory pages you posted, and I got the impression that you had an abstract audience in mind... i.e. people you think may benefit. But, when one writes to that type of target, you cannot tailor your "voice". Writing for an audience that is sympathetic to Rand is different from writing for someone who has a vague idea about Rand. Even when writing to a narrow audience like those sympathetic to Rand, one has to tailor one's material to a purpose. A reader who wants to get information to bolster his arguments is different from one who wants to get something from the book to help him in his own work/life in (say) the next year or two.

Edited by softwareNerd

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6 hours ago, softwareNerd said:

I asked the question because, after I read the introductory pages you posted, and I got the impression that you had an abstract audience in mind... i.e. people you think may benefit. But, when one writes to that type of target, you cannot tailor your "voice". Writing for an audience that is sympathetic to Rand is different from writing for someone who has a vague idea about Rand. Even when writing to a narrow audience like those sympathetic to Rand, one has to tailor one's material to a purpose. A reader who wants to get information to bolster his arguments is different from one who wants to get something from the book to help him in his own work/life in (say) the next year or two.

There are following connections the book makes.

1.) Organizational Ethics and Management. (Basically conveys that the two are same).

2.) Organizational Ethics and Ethics, Objectivist Ethics in particular.

3.) Organizational Ethics and Industrial Sociology

4.) Organizational Ethics and relevant facts.

5.) Objectivist Ethics and relevant facts.

6.) Industrial Sociology and relevant facts.

So the reviewer needs to judge following two things

a.) Are these connections actually made in the book, to sufficient degree.

b.) Are these connections useful to the intended audience described in my previous comment.

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