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MisterSwig

My Free Will Theory

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I created a blog to introduce my theory on free will:

https://freewilltheory.blogspot.com/2019/04/free-will-is-learned-skill.html?m=1

My goal is to identify the necessary steps in the development of free will, starting from birth. I briefly discuss reflexes, feelings, and purpose, and how they relate to gaining control over one's body and mind.

I appreciate any comments or criticism, placed here or on the blog.

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4 hours ago, MisterSwig said:

I created a blog to introduce my theory on free will:

https://freewilltheory.blogspot.com/2019/04/free-will-is-learned-skill.html?m=1

My goal is to identify the necessary steps in the development of free will, starting from birth. I briefly discuss reflexes, feelings, and purpose, and how they relate to gaining control over one's body and mind.

I appreciate any comments or criticism, placed here or on the blog.

I would have assumed that at the beginning of a theory of free will you would define exactly what you mean by “free will” before addressing what you argue makes it possible (and what you submit is necessary for a complex system to do it) and why.  

Identifying “free will” is necessary to make a persuasive argument, to make a reasoned rational claim which justifies your theory as against any other speculation, and distinguishes your chosen topics (feelings, reflexes, purpose) as uniquely generating free will as opposed to generating mechanistic (determined) animation.

Accordingly, for any particular aspect of your theory of free will, a reader should always be clear about what you mean by  free will, and clearly shown how and why the particular aspect relates to it and not determinism.

 

Edited by StrictlyLogical

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4 hours ago, StrictlyLogical said:

Accordingly, for any particular aspect of your theory of free will, a reader should always be clear about what you mean by  free will, and clearly shown how and why the particular aspect relates to it and not determinism.

Thanks. If I write a longer treatise for a general audience, I would definitely need to do that. But I wrote this introduction for Objectivists and people who already share a non-deterministic view of free will, so I did not bother addressing determinism just yet. I also left out a bunch about concept-formation, since Rand wrote a whole book on that already. After listening to others, I apparently also need to address Pavlov's theory.

I suppose I could define free will at the start. But I worry about distracting the reader's attention from the process, which does not begin with free will already established. I tried to incorporate induction into my style. In general, I want the reader to use his own concepts and definitions, and be convinced that my theory fits with his own general knowledge. However, I could not resist giving a hint in the title, where I call free will a learned skill.

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2 hours ago, StrictlyLogical said:

Do you want any help honing your theory i.e. strengthening it in response to possible criticism?

Absolutely, any suggestion or criticism is appreciated. Even if someone thinks the theory is ridiculous, I'd like to know why.

I have plans for additional essays, but will prioritize responding to reader's points or objections. Thanks.

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