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Favorite Non-Ayn Rand Novel?

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I'm just interested to hear what your favorite novels not written by Ayn Rand are. Right now, mine is Catcher in the Rye. I think many Objectivists would be able to relate to it in some ways. If Dominique is Ayn Rand in a bad mood, Holden Caufield is Dominique in a bad mood.

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Mm, that's a tough one.

Probably Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neal Gaiman, although it's not exactly deep reading. My tastes have changed a lot in recent years.

Shogun by James Clavell is very good.

A Woman of Substance by Barbara Taylor Bradford is also fantastic.

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The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky.

Some of the best dialogues/conversations I've ever read. Even though most critics prefer The Brothers Karamazov, The Brothers always came across to me as a watered down version of The Idiot.

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FotF tops my list as well :)

Its good too see so many fans of FotF. What one admires in art can speak volumes of their character, provided of course that they like it for the right reasons....

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My favorite non-Rand book would have to be Les Miserables. I'm currently reading it for the second time.

I am not in love with your Jesus, who went about preaching renunciation and self-sacrifice- a miser's advice to beggars. Renunciation for what reason, sacrifice to what end? I have never heard of a wolf sacrificing its self for the good of another wolf. Les Miserables
Edited by Rearden_Steel

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Its good too see so many fans of FotF.  What one admires in art can speak volumes of their character, provided of course that they like it for the right reasons....

I have loved all the Sword of Truth series but FotF was the shining example of Richard as the 'efficacious man', using only his reason, character and drive to improve what people in the collectivist 'Old World' thought should be his just position in their society, and how the heroic can truly inspire the minds of others to throw off the shackles of stagnant thinking.

Also, Mr. Goodkind's explorations into the true evils of altruism in FotF were almost as vivid as any I have read in Miss Rand's fiction.

>>>Edited to fix broken quote--JMeganSnow<<<

Edited by JMeganSnow

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Opps...you accidently stuffed up that quote at the top of your post... :)

Anyway....

The explanation you give of FoTf is banging the nail right on the head. And why I love the novel so, that and how it explores the nature of good and bad art. I assume this is another reason alot of people like Faith of the Fallen. As Miss Rand points out, art is a critical part of human existence and art reflects ones view of existence.

Indeed, Terrys explantaion of altruism are close to those I have read in Miss Rands fiction. Not quite as skillfully portrayed, but pretty close. It is certaintly the best I have read from any fantasy author so far.

>>>edited to remove broken quote--JMeganSnow<<<

Edited by JMeganSnow

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Watership Down by Richard Adams. A gripping tale of a heroic quest for survival, and a victorious battle against a nightmarish tyranny. I find it creates a sense of exultation perhaps even greater than Rand's own novels. (In my experience the only one of Rand's works that comes close in terms of raw emotional power is Anthem.)

Plus, it's about rabbits. What's not to like?

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There is a novel which will probably always be special to me. It is a one which I had read as a child - In Desert & Wilderness by H. Sienkiewicz. It is a wonderfully written tale of heroism with a romantic view of life and a good moral foundation; uplifting and powerful.

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Watership Down by Richard Adams. A gripping tale of a heroic quest for survival, and a victorious battle against a nightmarish tyranny. I find it creates a sense of exultation perhaps even greater than Rand's own novels. (In my experience the only one of Rand's works that comes close in terms of raw emotional power is Anthem.)

Plus, it's about rabbits. What's not to like?

I also love Watership Down.

My current favorite non-Rand novel is Mila 18, which I reviewed back when I was still writing for the Atlasphere. It's an amazing story of heroes who refused to give in to the Nazis during WWII, and I love that the women are just as brave as the men without being unfeminine.

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Lord of the Barnyard: Killing the Fatted Calf and Arming the Aware in the Cornbelt by Tristan Egolf. Outcast farming prodigy is harassed by a town of unintelligent, anti-humans until he takes revenge by turning the town into a literal trash dump. Realism, with an interesting (if not admirable) hero. The author had a skill for language that was absolutely jaw-dropping, as well.

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I also love Watership Down.

My current favorite non-Rand novel is Mila 18, which I reviewed back when I was still writing for the Atlasphere. It's an amazing story of heroes who refused to give in to the Nazis during WWII, and I love that the women are just as brave as the men without being unfeminine.

I agree, Mila 18 is nothing short of amazing.

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and I love that the women are just as brave as the men without being unfeminine.

That is how Polish women are :D

I am sure you know, but for those who don't, Mila 18 was a street address of the underground headquarters for the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.

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That is how Polish women are :D

I am sure you know, but for those who don't, Mila 18 was a street address of the underground headquarters for the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.

It also showed how utterly wrong the pacifist Jews were, there. Cause for a lot of them, it took them far too long before they even considered fighting back =( But yeah, the heroism the ones who did fight back displayed was inspiring indeed.

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One of my favorites is Asimov's "The End of Eternity."

I've recently come to relize just why: it lays bare the essence of altruism, and it shows its ultimate consequences. I'm sure Asimov did not intend it, although he may have had an "extreme" form of altruism in mind, as he does make it explicit near the ending.

Now to see if the spoiler tags work:

Without trying to give too much away, "Eternity"

operates under the motto "the greatest good for the greatest number." That means meddling with the flow of history and keeping humanity "safe." Near the end someone points out the people who operate Eternity are all psycopaths, which is part of what I mean when i say it lays bare the essence of altruism.

In any case, it's an above average SF novel. And it is the most original time-travel novel ever written. The paperback I own carries the tag "time travel with a twist," and let me assure you that's an understatement.

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Hugo's Nintey-three, and though it's not a novel, I rank Rostand's Cyrano de Bergerac right up there. I've never had a novel or a play bring me to tears until I read Cyrano.

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