Jump to content
Objectivism Online Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Guest YuceMajeste

The Story Behind Ayn Rand's name change

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Guest YuceMajeste

Does anyone know the story behind Ms.Ayn Rand's changing her name?I mean, why Ayn Rand?

Regards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't remember exactly why she changed it and how she derived the name Ayn Rand. However, I do know for a fact that it is mentioned in her video biography, Ayn Rand: A Sense of Life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Teresa

'Ayn Rand' is not her birth name, but it is the name she used most of her life. She adopted that name when she left the Soviet Union.

Rand's Russian birth name can be transliterated into English as 'Alisa Zinovievna Rosenbaum.' (The first name is also sometimes transliterated as 'Alissa' or 'Alyssa,' or translated into 'Alice.')

[*] In a letter to a fan, Rand wrote that "'Ayn' is both a real name and an invention. The original of it is a Finnish feminine name." This Finnish name is pronounced "I-na" and would be written as 'Aina' in English. Rand shortened this to the single syllable 'Ayn'.

[*]

How she came to choose 'Rand' as a last name is less clear, partly because of the many contradictory speculations about it:

Barbara Branden repeats a story from a cousin of Rand's, who claimed that Rand took the name from a Remington-Rand typewriter while living with relatives in Chicago in 1926. Although widely repeated, this story contains an impossible anachronism: Remington Typewriter did not merge with Rand Kardex until 1927, so Rand could not possibly have owned a "Remington-Rand" typewriter in 1926. Nor could it have been a Rand Kardex typewriter, because that company did not make typewriters. Also, evidence has been found that Rand's relatives in Russia knew of her new name prior to her arrival in the US.

[*]

Jeff Walker suggests that she chose 'Rand' because of its association with South African gold currency ('The Rand'). Like the story Branden tells, this suggestion is also an anachronism: that name for the currency was adopted years after Rand chose her new name. In 1926 the South African currency was denominated in "pounds" and "shillings." (Walker also dismisses Rand's own account of the origin of her first name as a "flimsy legend," although he provides no evidence for this claim.)

[*]

Researchers at the Ayn Rand Institute's archives have pointed out that characters from Rand's original name, when written in the Cyrillic characters used for Russian, resemble the letters of 'Rand' when it is written in English. David Hayes provides a discussion of this idea with an illustration of the characters.

This last seems the most likely explanation, because it is consistent with statements in media profiles that Rand's American name was a version of her Russian surname. Unfortunately, without some firmer confirmation, this suggestion remains somewhat speculative. It has, however, been given a tentative endorsement by the Ayn Rand Institute in its newsletter and on its website.

After her marriage, Rand also used the names "Ayn Rand O'Connor" or "Mrs. Frank O'Connor" in some settings.

[*]

Above excerpted from http://www.noblesoul.com/orc/bio/biofaq.html#Q2.5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...