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Linda

Entertainer Robin Field joins QCFA Arts Cruise

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Good News! The inimitable Robin Field has signed on to perform for us on the 2008 QCFA Arts Cruise. We are very much honored. Many of our attendees have already had the good fortune of experiencing a Robin Field performance, but even those may be unaware of some of Robin's impressive accomplishments and the wide range of his performing career:

ROBIN FIELD is an award-winning entertainer whose career has spanned six decades. As a singer-pianist his appearances have taken him from cabarets to Carnegie Hall. As an actor he won leading roles Off-Broadway in Your Own Thing, Look Me Up, Speed Gets the Poppys and the revival of Rodgers & Hart's Babes in Arms. As a member of The Klowns, Field toured with the Ringling Bros. & Barnum & Bailey Circus, recorded for RCA Victor and starred in an ABC-TV special with Sammy Davis and Jerry Lewis. In 1972 Dom De Luise presented him as his "discovery" on "The Merv Griffin Show." As a composer-lyricist Field toured the U.S. and Canada in his own one-man show Reason in Rhyme, based on Ayn Rand's philosophy of Objectivism, and he wrote, directed and starred in seven editions of Broadway - A Hundred Years Ago. For five years he served as creator and host of the New York radio series "Broadway Time Capsule" and for two years as editor and publisher of Revival, a magazine on theatrical history. He and his singing partner Bill Daugherty won rave reviews throughout the U.S. as well as in London and Amsterdam, won four MAC awards for "Best Musical-Comedy Team," and their show Daugherty & Field Off-Broadway was nominated for a New York Outer Critics' Circle Award as "Best Musical Revue." In 1992 they headlined at Carnegie Hall to a sell-out crowd and a standing ovation.

In regional productions Field played Axel in Don't Drink the Water, Beverly Carlton in The Man Who Came to Dinner, Captain Keller in The Miracle Worker, Frederick in The Pirates of Penzance, Ko-Ko in The Mikado, Judge Wargrave in Ten Little Indians and Mark Twain in Mark Twain in Concert. He also wrote, composed and directed the musicals Blossoms of Big Bear, The Bronze Ring, The Singing Mountains, The Crystal Palace and Tom Sawyer, and he is currently writing a musical adaptation of Cyrano de Bergerac.

Robin joins an already impressive group of contributors including: Bryan Larsen, Dr Dianne Durante, Stephen Siek, Thomas Shoebotham, Alan August, David Berry and Joel Marquez. The cruise will also feature a live performance of Maurice Maeterlinck's "Monna Vanna" considered by Ayn Rand to be "...one of the greatest plays in all world literature."

We're very much looking forward to an outstanding, rejuvenative, educational and refreshing Arts Cruise for all! We sail on January 6, 2008 from Galveston, Texas. Don't miss this opportunity; there are only a few cabins remaining.

Please feel free to call Linda Cordair at (866) 267-3247 toll-free if you have any questions or requests. You can also e-mail us at [email protected]

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On ‎4‎/‎20‎/‎2016 at 7:41 PM, dream_weaver said:

A sample of his work.

Published on Jul 24, 2014

This is a Philosophic Oratorio Written by Robin Field in the 1970's
The title is Reason in Rhyme Formerly Three Questions.

 

Can anyone make out the lyrics just after "living" at 55:55 and just before "a feeling of pride" at 56:00?

 

BTW: I highly recommend a full viewing!

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Picking up at "living" without it, the feeling of pride.

I'm trying to read lips a bit, and cross reference it, but I don't recognize the root song it is coming from.

Probably because that section (mixing in some pop songs on feelings) was earlier. This was more of an ethical passage.

Edited by dream_weaver

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How about "[there's] no living without it . . . the feeling of pride."

I added the word [there's] as poetic clarity, but I've watch him mouth it about 4 or 5 times. The voice and picture tracks look synced well to me.

Edited by dream_weaver

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8 hours ago, dream_weaver said:

How about "[there's] no living without it . . . the feeling of pride."

I added the word [there's] as poetic clarity, but I've watch him mouth it about 4 or 5 times. The voice and picture tracks look synced well to me.

Thank you!  My stumbling block was always hearing "Oh living ... Xxxx ... A feeling of pride". Now I can hear "No living ... Without it... A feeling of pride"

Thank you!

 

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7 minutes ago, Plasmatic said:

I just discovered Field's video the other day. It is a masterful integration! I have done similar poetry myself. 

If you are comfortable posting some of it in member writings, do share.

An hour long, and to music on top of it, is a much grander scale than I've aspired to thus far.

7 hours ago, StrictlyLogical said:

Thank you!

I am glad to have helped.

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An interview with Robin Field in The Objective Standard

Robin Field on Objectivism and the Performing Arts

Here's a taste of the interview:

Biddle: What was the first instance of your explicitly integrating philosophy with performing arts?

Field: In my twenties I wrote a few operettas based on classic fairy tales. But I had to revise the morals of each story, because they were usually so offensive to me. So in The Bronze Ring, in which magic made everything come out right, I made it about honesty instead. In The Crystal Palace, in which the hero had to learn humility, I made the case for legitimate pride. And in Little Red Riding Hood, the message went from “Always obey your parents” to “Learn to think for yourself.” But my only show about philosophy itself was Reason in Rhyme, which I originally called Three Questions.

Biddle: And what was the inspiration for that?

Field: During the seventies I was taking Leonard Peikoff’s lectures “live” in New York, with Miss Rand taking part in the questions afterwards, and I was beginning to understand the whole structure and validation of Objectivism—but it was difficult to retain, even though I took pretty good notes. So I found myself boiling the ideas down into little rhymes, such as “Volition is the ignition.” And I thought, you know, I can do this with the whole philosophy. So I conceived the idea of writing myself a whole one-man show of songs and poems as a musical-comedy lecture. Partly I wanted to demonstrate my abilities as a songwriter and entertainer and distinguish myself from other talents in New York, and partly I wanted to perform more meaningful material than I had done before.

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On 5/7/2016 at 8:07 AM, StrictlyLogical said:

Thank you!  My stumbling block was always hearing "Oh living ... Xxxx ... A feeling of pride". Now I can hear "No living ... Without it... A feeling of pride"

Thank you!

Confirmed, from the horse's mouth:

Looking
At who you can be,
Liking
The person you see,
Knowing
The person that’s living inside;
No living without it,
The feeling of pride.

 

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