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Libertarianism

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When people ask me what my political beliefs are, I usually just reply with a simplistic "I'm a libertarian". Of course, as an Objectivist, there is much I disagree with the libertarian movement on, and, specifically, the Libertarian Party-- the least of which is the tolerance of so-called "anarcho-capitalists" and those who believe government is a "necessary evil" (if it's necessary, then it's not evil).

Unlike other Objectivists, I do not have a problem with libertarianism as a *political* movement. I do, however, take issue with those more philosophical libertarians who put forth the proposition that the "non-aggression" principle is a self-evident axiom.

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When people ask me what my political beliefs are, I usually just reply with a simplistic "I'm a libertarian". Of course, as an Objectivist,

Why contradict yourself? Can't you just say your political beliefs are in line with Objectivism, or that you're an "Objective-Capitalist"?

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Why contradict yourself? Can't you just say your political beliefs are in line with Objectivism, or that you're an "Objective-Capitalist"?

I usually tell people I'm a secular, pro-freedom individualist. The secular part tells them I'm not a Republican, and the pro-freedom individualist part tells them I'm not a Democrat. Many people these days implicitly approach politics as a team sport, in which one picks one's party and then roots for them. I don't have a party, I have political values which I try to advance in a variety of ways, of which voting is only one. People find this approach to politics intriguing, apparently because they don't encounter it often.

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Why contradict yourself? Can't you just say your political beliefs are in line with Objectivism, or that you're an "Objective-Capitalist"?

It is worth it to ask myself whether I wish to engage in that type of discussion with someone to begin with. If I don't think the conversation is going to be productive, why waste the effort of explaining Objectivism and capitalism?

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It is worth it to ask myself whether I wish to engage in that type of discussion with someone to begin with. If I don't think the conversation is going to be productive, why waste the effort of explaining Objectivism and capitalism?

Then you might want to say, "Sort of like the libertarians, but not exactly. I have my disagreements with them, but they're the closest you've likely heard of." Or something to that effect. But don't just outright endorse them, is what I mean.

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Then you might want to say, "Sort of like the libertarians, but not exactly. I have my disagreements with them, but they're the closest you've likely heard of." Or something to that effect. But don't just outright endorse them, is what I mean.

I agree. It's alright to avoid certain terms if you're not in the mind to go through a lengthy discussion, but the situation is not worthy enough to lie in.

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I agree. It's alright to avoid certain terms if you're not in the mind to go through a lengthy discussion, but the situation is not worthy enough to lie in.

Seconded. When I tell people I'm a secular pro-freedom individualist, sometimes they respond with "So you're a libertarian?" That gives me a chance to explain why I'm not in a very brief, context-appropriate way, and they're more likely to listen because I'm directly answering a question they asked me.

This, incidentally, is a very useful conversational technique. If you can get the other person to ask you the question you want to answer, they're much more likely to listen to you while you answer it.

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I've done a number of videos on this topic. Here's the URL for the most recent one:

Hopefully, it will answer the questions you have.

Cheers

Paul

Great video Paul! It very clearly explains the problem with Libertarianism.

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