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D'kian
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You mean lose three. They lost three,

They lost three. There, we've said it three times :) Seriously, I apologize, I should remember how many championships the Broncos lost, if nothing else beacuse it annoys my borther.

I was a Dollars Taxes Cowboys fan once, when Aikman was QB.

Aikman. Hmm, yes. the name seems familiar. Wasn't he Steve Walsh's back-up <quickly runs under cover>

But I'm glad to see you're over the affliction.

BTW I've twice bet a co-worker the Cowboys would loose, and won both times. Last Monday he came up to me and told me "If you even as much as say the word 'bet,' I'll knock you silly." Of course, the Cowboys, I'm sure, can manage to loose to Phily without my help. So I'll forego another can of coke (we do play for serious stakes, as you can plainly see).

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Aikman. Hmm, yes. the name seems familiar. Wasn't he Steve Walsh's back-up <quickly runs under cover>

Haha, okay, :P but Aikman was a great passer who could put the ball on the mark under pressure.

But I'm glad to see you're over the affliction.

Hey, not a bad affliction. They won three Superbowls with Aikman. :)

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Hey, not a bad affliction. They won three Superbowls with Aikman. :thumbsup:

Sure. But for all that, they remained the Dallas Cowboys. No amount of Superbowl victories will change that.

Now, if they were to move the team to Los Angeles (assuming the NFL would let a team set up in a foreign country, that is) and rename it the LA Liberals, or something like that, then that might help.

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The season is over, finally the playoff picture is settled (Denver is still playing San Diego as I write, but, really, they're fighting for the privilege of loosing against Indianapolis next week).

Overall I see two big surprises: Miami and Arizona. The former ended last season 1-15, the latter are the Arizona Cardinals. Should Miami win the Superbowl, they'll have made the most amazing comeback ever.

And the Lions set a new standard for failed teams by loosing all 16 games. Unfortunately for them, there is no Messiah in line for next year's draft. Nor even a player so many teams want they could trade them for players and draft picks. So look for the Lions to remain near the basement for the foreseeable future (unless the Browns care to join them).

And Dallas has been eliminated, badly. They had, if not an unenviable position, then at least a desirable one: they controlled their own destiny. All they had to do was defeat the Eagles in Phily, which of course it's not easy. But loosing 44 to 6 is not easy either, for an alleged contender.

Here's some advice for the Cowboys: move heaven and Earth (particularly Earth) to get Matt Cassel out of New England. Then either replace Romo or use Cassel to pressure Romo. Either way, try to wind up with a QB who can play well when it matters most. As to the head coach, it's hard to say.

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The season is over, finally the playoff picture is settled (Denver is still playing San Diego as I write, but, really, they're fighting for the privilege of loosing against Indianapolis next week).

Overall I see two big surprises: Miami and Arizona. The former ended last season 1-15, the latter are the Arizona Cardinals. Should Miami win the Superbowl, they'll have made the most amazing comeback ever.

And the Lions set a new standard for failed teams by loosing all 16 games. Unfortunately for them, there is no Messiah in line for next year's draft. Nor even a player so many teams want they could trade them for players and draft picks. So look for the Lions to remain near the basement for the foreseeable future (unless the Browns care to join them).

And Dallas has been eliminated, badly. They had, if not an unenviable position, then at least a desirable one: they controlled their own destiny. All they had to do was defeat the Eagles in Phily, which of course it's not easy. But loosing 44 to 6 is not easy either, for an alleged contender.

Here's some advice for the Cowboys: move heaven and Earth (particularly Earth) to get Matt Cassel out of New England. Then either replace Romo or use Cassel to pressure Romo. Either way, try to wind up with a QB who can play well when it matters most. As to the head coach, it's hard to say.

I don't think Cassel would do anything in Dallas. When I look at all the QBs that have done well in the NFL they all have one thing in common; they all have great protection. Romo and almost every QB in the NFL looks good when they have time to throw. The O Line I do believe is the most important position(Collectively) in the NFL.

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I don't think Cassel would do anything in Dallas. When I look at all the QBs that have done well in the NFL they all have one thing in common; they all have great protection. Romo and almost every QB in the NFL looks good when they have time to throw. The O Line I do believe is the most important position(Collectively) in the NFL.

It depends. The offensive line is of crucial importance in developing and retaining a good offense. An average QB with average running-backs and an average receiving corps will do well with an above-average offensive line. But a good QB with everything else average and a horrid line would probably do as well.

Even a good offense is not necessarily important. Teams like Pittsburgh, Baltimore (Ravens) and Chicago have won championships on the strength of their defense, having only an average or even below average offense (although with good running backs). I mean, if your offense is only good enough for, say, 17 points at most, but your defense won't give up more than 12, you're going to do okay.

Of course a bad offense can harm the defense by not gaining enough time of possession. And ultimately the offense scores most of the points.

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It depends. The offensive line is of crucial importance in developing and retaining a good offense. An average QB with average running-backs and an average receiving corps will do well with an above-average offensive line. But a good QB with everything else average and a horrid line would probably do as well.

Offensive lines can make defensive secondaries look really bad. Green Bay, for instance, relies on bump-and-run coverage to defend against the pass. But not even Al Harris or Charles Woodson can lock down a bad receiver for 5-7 seconds. Because Green Bay's defensive line has been consistently beaten all year, mediocre teams have put up massive pass yardage against the Packers.

Can you name a team with a bad offensive line and good QB that has been successful?

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Can you name a team with a bad offensive line and good QB that has been successful?

Off the top of my head, no. Possibly the 70s Vikings with Fran Tarkington.

But this year the Steelers have had a great season with an average QB and one of the worst offensive lines in memory. I've said it before, if they had a good line they'd be the team to beat this year.

Without a good offensive line you need a QB that can release the ball fast, and receivers who can catch bad passes. Because the running game will be of little use, if any, except against horrid defenses like Cleveland or Detroit.

I'm not saying the offensive line can be amde of Swiss Cheese and still a team can win lots of championships, but that the O line isn't the be-all and end-all component in football. Also there are teams with a defensive focus and others with an offensive one. It's rare to ahve a team that's evenly matched in offense and defense. So for defensive teams, the offensive line isn't that important and usually gets neglected.

In the 70s there were two dominant teams: the Steelers and the Cowboys. Both were very strong on defense and just good enough in offense. The other good teams of the time also had strong defenses. Miami's "No Name" defense, the Vikings "Purple People Eaters," and Denver's "Orange Crush." I know both the Steelers and Cowboys boasted some of the best running backs of all time (Harris and Dorset), had great receiving corps and QBs that wound up in the Hall of Fame. But their strength lay in not letting the other teams score. Pittsburgh went most of a seson without Terry Bradshaw, and still reached the playoffs because they ahd the First Coming of the Steel Curtain at the time.

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Here's some advice for the Cowboys: move heaven and Earth (particularly Earth) to get Matt Cassel out of New England. Then either replace Romo or use Cassel to pressure Romo. Either way, try to wind up with a QB who can play well when it matters most. As to the head coach, it's hard to say.

There is absolutely no chance this will happen. Sure, the Cowboys collapsed in a rather bad way at the end of the year, but it's not because of the players. The Cowboys arguably have one of the strongest collections of offensive talent in the NFL, yet they failed to make the playoffs because of horrible coaching and team management. Any good coach would have firmly punished T.O. for all the bickering, finger-pointing, and back-talking. Along with significant injuries to Romo and Barber, T.O. clearly threw a wrench into the machine. Furthermore, Jerry Jones put so much pressure on players like Romo, Barber, and Witten to play despite injuries that they couldn't heal properly. Instead of building up the players as a cohesive unit (which includes being prepared to rely on backups), the Cowboys exist as a team of individual talents. Jones has the attitude that if he has the best individual players, his players should just win, without thought of how to develop a system in which they are all working towards the same goal effectively.

In contrast, look at the best example of fixing these problems: Tom Coughlin of the NY Giants. He has a vicious no-tolerance policy to bad behavior. No player is allowed to have such control over the entire team, and cause such a disruption. No matter who it is, a player will be suspended if he violates team rules. Furthermore, the team trains, practices, and plays as a cohesive unit. Their depth, especially in their offense, is substantial. The philosophy of the team is that everyone works towards the same goal: playing good football and winning games (as opposed to personally getting more catches/play-time). The one player that defied this policy was Plaxico Burress, and we all know how that turned out. The Giants had a hard time adjusting to his absence in the first two-weeks, but they are doing wonderfully now.

With all that in mind, I think the solution is definitely not to simply bring in a different big-name talent. The Cowboys need new management, and Jerry Jones needs to get his nose out of it all. They need a coach who will put his foot down and establish a no-nonsense, no-tolerance policy. They should fire Wade Phillips and place an immediate phone call to Bill Cowher, for coach or GM. Or even better, it's looking like Bill Parcells will opt-out of his contract with the Dolphins. He would be the perfect choice for GM. Alas, Jerry Jones has said that he is confident with the team's coaching. I think that's a huge mistake. Don't expect them to rebound next year.

As far as Matt Cassel goes, I fully expect him to be a New York Jet next year. While they're at it, if the Cowboys don't nab him, the Jets would be well advised to place a call to Bill Parcells as well.

Go Giants! Superbowl repeat!

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There is absolutely no chance this will happen.

Absolutely. that's why I offered it freely.

Sure, the Cowboys collapsed in a rather bad way at the end of the year, but it's not because of the players.

Some of it is. Just about every time they were close to scoring last Sunday, they fumbled the ball or threw interceptions. Besides this goes back further than this year. Romo is sure to loose in the playoffs as the lions in the regular season.

With all that in mind, I think the solution is definitely not to simply bring in a different big-name talent. The Cowboys need new management, and Jerry Jones needs to get his nose out of it all.

Jerry Jones is a big part of the problem. But he owns the team and he's the man he is. Get used to it until he gets tired and sells the team, or until he dies.

They should fire Wade Phillips and place an immediate phone call to Bill Cowher, for coach or GM.

Bite your tongue.

Or even better, it's looking like Bill Parcells will opt-out of his contract with the Dolphins. He would be the perfect choice for

Didn't Parcells coach Dallas for a while? I doubt he'd like to return. Plus why would he opt out in Miami? He's the man behind the Dolphins' turnaround. That's a major accomplishment I think he should want to build on.

As far as Matt Cassel goes, I fully expect him to be a New York Jet next year.

Not likely. He's a rookie, which means he's years away from free agency. He won't go anywhere the Pats don't want him to go, if they want him to go. And the last thing the Pats would ever do is something that might possibly benefit the Jets.

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There is absolutely no chance this will happen. Sure, the Cowboys collapsed in a rather bad way at the end of the year, but it's not because of the players. The Cowboys arguably have one of the strongest collections of offensive talent in the NFL, yet they failed to make the playoffs because of horrible coaching and team management. Any good coach would have firmly punished T.O. for all the bickering, finger-pointing, and back-talking.

From what I've seen of T.O. the guy is always a problem and no coach has been able to bring him under control, including Bill Parcels. So, I wouldn't blame the coach for that. They might need a psychiatrist to deal with him.

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Didn't Parcells coach Dallas for a while? I doubt he'd like to return. Plus why would he opt out in Miami? He's the man behind the Dolphins' turnaround. That's a major accomplishment I think he should want to build on.

Parcells did coach in Dallas before Wade Phillips, which is a perfect reason for him to come back there. He's familiar with a lot of the talent, management, and way things are done there. In my opinion, the Cowboys need a GM that will spurn a massive turnaround in their management philosophy.

There is a clause in Parcells' contract with Miami that if the team is sold, he has the option to leave the team along with huge bonuses. Because of the election of Obama, the owner is selling the team before he has to pay huge capital gains taxes. From what I've read in many news stories about it, Parcells is reluctant to work under the new ownership. It's a shame, because he has done great things with Miami, but he may just leave.

Not likely. He's a rookie, which means he's years away from free agency. He won't go anywhere the Pats don't want him to go, if they want him to go. And the last thing the Pats would ever do is something that might possibly benefit the Jets.

Cassel is not a rookie at all, and he is a free agent after this season. Given how well he played in Brady's place, the demand for his services will be high. There is absolutely no way that the Pats can afford to pay Cassel what he will ask, and there's no way Cassel will accept a job as a backup. It's remotely possible that the Pats will choose Cassel to be their new long-term quarterback, but I just don't see that happening. There are a number of teams where I could see Cassel going: the Jets, Chiefs, Lions, Raiders, Seahawks, and the 49ers are all likely bidders. Out of all those teams, I see the Jets having the greatest chance of landing him. It's the easiest geographical move, the Jets have the best chance at success next year of those teams, and the playing systems of the Patriots and the Jets are very similar.

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From what I've seen of T.O. the guy is always a problem and no coach has been able to bring him under control, including Bill Parcels.

Consider that at least two teams have opted to let him go. That's rare when the player is good. T.O. is very good, but he's also a major pain for every team he's played for.

So, I wouldn't blame the coach for that. They might need a psychiatrist to deal with him.

Nah. Just let him decide to whom should all passes be thrown and he'll be happy.

Seriously, the very best receivers go through prolonged periods of drought. The opposing team covers them so well they can't be thrown to. Ergo the QB throws more to the other receivers. This happens in all teams at all times. Mr. Owens seems to take it personally, but he's hardly the only one. Others just don't make such a big deal about it. Most other players are better disciplined.

I think Dallas' worst problem is the owner. A team's owner should concentrate on business and hire people to run the team, unless he can run the team himself. Al Davies could run the team at one time, and run it well (the Raiders excelled in the 70s and 80s, being the sole AFC team to win a Superbowl in the 80s). Jerry jones never could, though at one point he had a good staff that made up for his failings.

But Mr. Jones also likes to think the team revolves around him. He meddles, he berates the players, he pressures the team too much, etc. He should hire a good GM and a either keep the coach or hire a new one, and take a long vacation in, say, Los Angeles or any other country not interested in football. He can come back mid-season in 09.

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Consider that at least two teams have opted to let him go. That's rare when the player is good. T.O. is very good, but he's also a major pain for every team he's played for.

It probably wouldn't be such a problem if he weren’t so disruptive, but what he does is get other team members upset and I think that takes them off of their game. He doesn't bring the best out in others.

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Out of all those teams, I see the Jets having the greatest chance of landing him. It's the easiest geographical move, the Jets have the best chance at success next year of those teams, and the playing systems of the Patriots and the Jets are very similar.

I've nothing against the Jets, really I don't. I like the Jets (I'm an airplane aficionado, a team named "Jets" does arouse sympathy). Historically they did something of major importance by beating the Colts in SB III: they established the AFL as a serious enterprise with teams as good as those of the NFL. that made the merger more palatable to everyone involved.

But the Jets always have a good chance, and always manage to blow it somehow.

This year they landed one of the best ever QBs in the history of the league, their main rival had their starting QB injured, and still they couldn't clinch a playoff berth

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Po wittle Shanahan. Wonder if anyone else will pick him up? His coaching record is pretty good.

You know, for a coach wh won two Sueprbowls, his record isn't that good. He made the playoffs only half the seasons he coahed, and he's gone three years without making the post-season. But what I think got him fired was blowing a three game lead with three games to go this season.

I wonder how he compares to other recent Superbowl winners like Bellichick and Cowher.

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Coincidentally, Shanahan has the best record for any active coach against Bill Belichick. Including the postseason win, Shanahan is 5–2 against Belichick's Patriots, the five wins coming in the last six meetings.

From... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Shanahan

Record isn't that good?! There are few better in the league now. I'm not saying there aren't any up-and-comers that won't be just as good, eventually, or that his being let go was a mistake, but let's give the guy credit where credit is due. He's a great coach. The stats you criticize him for...most coaches would be thrilled to achieve.

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Record isn't that good?!

Not for a coach who's won the Superbowl twice. I mean, he's not like Tom Landry or Don Shula who regularly took their teams to the playoffs year after year.

There are few better in the league now. I'm not saying there aren't any up-and-comers that won't be just as good, eventually, or that his being let go was a mistake, but let's give the guy credit where credit is due.

I'll repeat the last stats I quoted: no playoffs in the last three years, plus he blew a three game division lead with three games to go.

He's a great coach. The stats you criticize him for...most coaches would be thrilled to achieve.

Absolutely. But if he dind't want me to criticize him, he shouldn't have coached the Broncos :D

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