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Okay, I'm bored right now so I want to know how often do you read and what book or books are you currently reading?

I'll start off; I "usually" try to read about 30 to 45 minutes a day and I'm currently struggling to read The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money.

Your turn...

Also Barack Obama reads 95 books a year, I don't care what anyone says that is quite a load of books! Dummy he is not.

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Okay, I'm bored right now so I want to know how often do you read and what book or books are you currently reading?

More or less daily, often working through multiple books at the same time. Right now, for example, I'm reading Paul Boghossian's Fear of Knowledge: Against Relativism and Constructivism and Alastair Reynolds' Century Rain. I recently finished Neal Asher's Shadow of the Scorpion, a couple of novellas by Steven Erickson, and Andy Bernstein's Objectivism in One Lesson. My forward-looking reading stack includes Scientific Irrationalism by David Stove, The Killing of History by Keith Windschuttle and Blink and The Tipping Point both by Malcolm Gladwell.

I kind of hope Obama keeps reading 95 books a year, because the more time he spends reading the less time he has to grind the tattered remnants of my freedom into dust.

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Currently I average about one to two hours a day during the week, and a little more than than on weekends unless I am out and about in the mountains. I read for one hour every night before I sleep, at a minimum, no matter what time I turn in.

Books I am currently reading: "The Invisible Constitution" - a fascinating read so far that is likely to inspire a topic on may part once I am done, "American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House," and "The Founders and the Classics: Greece, Rome, and the American Enlightenment." For thinking breaks in between I am a new addict of Nintendo DS Brain Academy. I am mystified at how my brain is equally entertained by deep thought as it is by making split second decisions about which side of the screen has more value in coins or replacing erased lines in rotated images. :P

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I haven't been reading as much as I should have. The book I'm reading isn't very exciting, interesting, but kind of boring, The Forgotten Man by Amity Schlaes. I think a good deal of it might be going over my head a bit too, I'm not very knowledgable with economics. It'll warrant a reread though, when I feel better prepared.

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Well, I am usually incredibly busy but am currently on winter break so I've been reading probably about 3 hours per week. Usually I just read for fun at stoplights when I'm driving, which amounts to probably an hour a week.

I'm currently trying to improve my spanish by reading the spanish version of Dan Browns "Deception point."

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The Hitch-hiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

I usually read for about 20-40 minutes a few times a week if it's non-fiction, with fiction I can read for hours if it's a good book.

For thinking breaks in between I am a new addict of Nintendo DS Brain Academy.

I was a bit sceptical about how well that game really works but it looks fun so I think I'll get it. Also, Professor X uses it in the commercial and you can't argue with that.

Edited by James I
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Also Barack Obama read 95 books a year, I don't care what anyone says that is quite a load of books! Dummy he is not.

I actually made a list of what I read from in '08. I had a major reading binge last year, most I ever read, lots of good quotes among them, but also some really horrible poetry like most of the contemporary free verse poetry I read, but here's my list, not sure how many:

Kay Nolte Smith's A Tale of the Wind(still haven't finished last 1/4)

Victor Hugo's The Hunchback of Notre Dame(audiobook)

Book One: Jack Frake of the Sparrowhawk series by Edward Cline

The Modern Library Writer's Workshop by Stephen Koch

Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter (audiobook)

Janet Burroway's Writing Fiction A Guide to the Narrative Craft

Creating Fiction edited by Julie Checkoway

The Teenage Liberation Handbook by Grace Llewellyn

John Holt How Children Fail

How Children Learn John Holt

Stephen King's On Writing

Book 1 Alanna: The First Adventure Tamora Pierce (audiobook)

Book 2 In the Hand of the Goddess Tamora Pierce (audiobook)

Book 3 The Woman Who Rides Like a Man Tamora Pierce (audiobook)

Annie Dillard’s The Writing Life

Natalie Goldberg’s Writing Down the Bones

Write Right by Jan Venolia

Good Advice on Writing by William Safire and Leonard Safir

The Thirsty Muse - Alcohol and the American Writer by Tom Dardis

The Midnight Disease - The Drive to Write, Writer's Block and the Creative Brain by Alice W. Flaherty

Nathaniel Branden's The Art of Living Consciously

[at this time in April and May '08 I had a major writing purge that interrupted my reading binge and caused me to actually use up around 128 hours of PTO time off at the hospital. I would also say that it was pretty hypergraphic time for me and it was interfering with work and frustrated me so much to leave my writing]

Final Salute By Jim Sheeler

Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Walter Kaufmann translation) (again)

Gut Symmetries by Jeanette Winterson

Cosette: The Sequel to Les Miserables by Laura Kalpakian

Emily Dickinson: An Interpretive Biography by Thomas H. Johnson

My Wars Are Laid Away In Books: The Life of Emily Dickinson by Alfred Harbegger

The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, Thomas H. Johnson editor

PS, I Love You by Cecelia Ahern

The PowerBook by Jeanette Winterson

The Passion by Jeanette Winterson

Lighthousekeeping by Jeanette Winterson

The Belle of Amherst: A Play Based on the Life of Emily Dickinson by William Luce

Open Me Carefully: Emily Dickinson's Intimate Letters to Susan Huntington Dickinson edited by Ellen Louise Hart and Martha Nell Smith

The Emily Dickinson Handbook edited by Gudrun Grabher, Roland Hagenbuchle, Cristanne Miller

Visiting Emily : Poems Inspired by the Life & Work of Emily Dickinson, edited by Sheila Coghill & Thom Tammaro

Reveries Of A Bachelor by Ik Marvel

Emily Dickinson's Gardens: A celebration of a poet and gardner, by Marta McDowell

Letters of Emily Dickinson edited by Mabel Loomis Todd

Rose by V.C. Andrews

Selected Poems of Swinburne, edited by Edward Shanks

Slaughterhouse Five or The Children's Crusade by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr

Afternoons With Emily by Rose MacMurray

Book Two: Hugh Kenrick of the Sparrowhawk Series by Edward Cline

Book Three: Caxton of the Sparrowhawk series written by Edward Cline

Shakespeare's The Sonnets

The Garden by Elsie V. Aidinoff

Foolproof Guide to Growing Roses by Field Roebuck

The Complete Poems of Emily Jane Bronte edited by C. W. Hatfield

Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

Four Great Plays by Henrik Ibsen (translated by R. Farquharson Sharp, with an Introduction and a Preface to each play by John Gassner)

Ibsen: The Complete Major Prose Plays translated and introduction by Rolf Fjelde

Ibsen: A Biography by Michael Meyer

Book Four: Empire of the Sparrowhawk series written by Edward Cline

Book Five: Revolution of the Sparrowhawk series by Edward Cline

Book Six: War of the Sparrowhawk series written by Edward Cline

Emily Bronte's only novel Wuthering Heights

Victor Hugo's Les Miserables the unabridged version, translated by Charles E. Wilbour

Emma by Jane Austen

Carol Shields on Jane Austen

Victor Hugo: A Tumultuous Life written by Samuel Edwards

Victor Hugo And His World written by Andre Maurois

Jane Austen her life written by Park Honan

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Mary Stuart / The Maid of Orleans : Two Plays in One Volume, both plays are by Friedrich von Schiller, translated by Charles E. Passage

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's Faust, translated by George Madison Priest, 2 ed.

The Novelwritten by Richard Freedman

Literary Women by Ellen Moers

The Poetical Works of John Milton, Volume 1: Paradise Lost

Milton: Paradise Lost A Collection of Critical Essays, edited by Louis L. Martz

Infernowritten by Dante Alighieri and translated by Michael Palma

Imaginary Gardens A Study of Five American Poets by Rosemary Sprague

Marianne by George Sand

The Poetry of American Women from 1632 to 1945 written by Emily Stipes Watts

George Sand A Woman's Life Writ Large by Belinda Jack

The Poetical Works Of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Cambridge Edition, with a new introduction by Ruth M. Adams

The Collected Poems of Sara Teasdale

Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw

The Norton Anthology of Poetry (the shorter fourth edition)

The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women

Zuleika Dobson by Max Beerbohm

Sara Teasdale A Biography written by Margaret Haley Carpenter

Sara Teasdale Woman & Poet written by William Drake

Duse: A Biography written by William Weaver

Circumference and Circumstance Stages in the Mind and Art of Emily Dickinson written by William R. Sherwood

Eugene O'Neill Poems 1912-1944 edited by Donald Gallup

Early Poems Edna St. Vincent Millay edited with an introduction and notes by Holly Peppe

The Complete Poetical Works of Amy Lowell with an introduction by Louis Untermeyer, The Cambridge Edition of the Poets

The Poems of John Keats selected and edited by Henry Newbolt

A Little Treasury of Great Poetry The Best Poems of Seven Centuries edited by Oscar Williams

Shelley Poetical Works edited by Thomas Hutchinson

The Complete Poetical Works of Byron, Cambridge Edition

The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald A New Collection edited and with a preface by Matthew J. Bruccoli

The Complete Novels & Selected Tales of Nathaniel Hawthorne published by The Modern Library

Tartuffe and Other Plays by Moliere translated and with an introduction by Donald M. *****

Zadig and Other Romances By Voltaire translated by H.I. Woolf and Winfrid Jackson, with an introduction and notes by H.I. Woolf

The Modern Library's Six Great Plays for Today, selected, and with biographical notes, by Bennet Cerf

The Poetry Anthology, 1912 - 2002 Ninety Years of America's Most Distinguished Verse Magazine, edited by Joseph Parisi and Stephen Young

The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction (Fourth Edition) R.V.Cassili

Ninety-Three by Victor Hugo, with an introduction written by Ayn Rand

Hernani, The Twin Brothers, Angelo, Amy Robsart, Mary Tudor, Ruy Blas, Torquemada, Esmeralda by Victor Hugo - all in one big book!

Victor Hugo's Conversations With The spirit World: A Literary Genius's Hidden Life authored by John Chambers

Collected Lyrics of Edna St. Vincent Millay

Select Poems and Tragedies of/by Victor Hugo

The Collected Plays of Terence Rattigan Volume One It includes:

French Without Tears, Flare Path, While The Sun Shines, Love in Idleness

The Winslow Boy

The Blue Bedroom and Other Stories by Rosamunde Pilcher

Mother: A Cradle To Hold Me, by Maya Angelou

The Father by Sharon Olds

No Heaven by Alicia Suskin Ostriker

The Glass Age by Cole Swensen

Red Sugar by Jan Beatty

Elegy by Mary Jo Bang

a night without armor Poems by Jewel (Kilcher)

Summons poems by Deborah Tall

Delights & Shadows by Ted Koose

The Wellspring poems by Sharon Olds

Ruin by Cynthia Cruz

Sleeping in the Woods by David Wagoner

The Dead and the Living by Sharon Olds

The Pittsburgh Book of Contemporary American Poetry editors Ed Ochester and Peter Oresick

The Blue Bird by Maurice Maeterlinck

The Complete Book of Les Miserables by Edward Behr

The Complete Grimm's Fairy Tales, introduction by Padraic Colum, commentary by Joseph Campbell

German Demystified: A self-Teaching Guide by Ed Swick (only1/4)

Death by Maurice Maeterlinck, translated by Alexander Teixeira De Mattos

The Double Garden by Maurice Maeterlinck, translated by Alexander Teixeira De Mattos

The Cloud That Lifted and The Power of The Dead, two plays in one volume by Maurice Maeterlinck, translated by F.M.Atkinson

Joyzelle (translated by A. Teixeira De Mattos) and Monna Vanna (translated by Alfred Sutro) two plays in one volume, by Maurice Maeterlinck (note: Monna Vanna translation by Alexis Irenee Du Pont Coleman is superior)

Alexander Solzhenitsyn's One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

The Annotated Alice ( which includes Alice in Wonderland & Through the Looking Glass) by Lewis Carroll, with an introduction and notes by Martin Gardner (the complete text and original illustrations)

The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy

Our Mutual Friend by Charles Dickens (the Oxford Illustrated Dickens edition with the original illustrations)

Emile, or On Education by Jean-Jacques Rousseau translated by Barbara Faxley with an introduction by P.D. Jimack

The Moral Judgment of the Child by Jean Piaget (with the assistance of seven collaborators) translated by Majorie Gabain

The Essential Piaget: An Interpretive Reference and Guide 100th Anniversary Edition, Howard E. Gruber and J. Jacques Voneche as editors

Virtues in Verse: The Best Poetry of Berton Braley edited and arranged by Linda Tania Abrams

Stand Fast For Freedom by Lowell Thomas and Berton Braley

Inside by Kenneth J. Harvey

[Note: besides that time off, I rarely take off a day of work; I worked the last eight months at the hopital with only 2 days off during it, and that was one weekvnd last summer, because I had to take off to get paid for 2 holidays that I workvd.]

Edited by intellectualammo
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I try to keep a book for leisure and a book that applies to my career/constructive interests. Currently I am rereading The Count of Monte Cristo and the second largest book in my collection: Security Analysis. It's a beast.

I currently try to read about an hour and a half to two hours a day not including school work. The time I read on the weekend depends largely on how busy I am.

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I kind of hope Obama keeps reading 95 books a year, because the more time he spends reading the less time he has to grind the tattered remnants of my freedom into dust.

I searched around a bit and found this site: http://www.makeliterature.com/blog/barack-...as-reading-list

Mr. Obama has several decent books on his list. I also found this laughable photo, where he's carrying Zakaria’s “The Post-American World" and looks more rockstar than politician.

Edited by adrock3215
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It varies because sometimes I can't find books I'm interested in, or lack enough money. But I estimate I read between 10 and 15 new books per year. Mostly I read science fiction, alternate histories and science books.

I read every day. If I don't have new books, I re-read older ones.

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There are some great works in there!

Yes, fortunately there are many that I did like. Among the worst, besides most of the contemporary poetry, I think all of those Norton Anthology's were tremendously disappointing for what little I liked in them, and of their selections of those writers and poets that I am familiar with, weren't some of their best to me and I think I can say it was actually a disservice to at least one of them.

So far I read this month:

The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett introduced by Sophie Dahl

Narcissus and Goldmund by Herman Hesse

Inside the Secret Garden A Treasury of Crafts, Recipes, and Activities by Carolyn Strom Collins and Christina Wyss Eriksson

The Practical Cogitator The Thinkers Anthology selected and edited by Charlvs P. Curtis, Jr. and Ferris Greenlet

Becoming a Writer by Dorthea Brande, foreward by John Gardner

Pegasus Pulls a Hack Memoirs of a Modern Minstrel by Berton Braley

Gone With The Wind authored by Margaret Mitchell and preface by Pat Conroy

Sara Teasdale's poetry collection titled Love Songs

Flame and Sword a poetry collection by Sara Teasdale

Rivers to the Sea a poetry collection by Sara Teasdale

I recently purchased online access to The Emily Dickinson Journal, a scholarly journal from Johns Hopkins University Press and so I will be making my way through all of them now. I starting with:

Volume 1, Number 1, Spring 1992. (108pages)

I finished it and now I'm currently reading:

Volume 1, Number 2, Fall 1992 (124pages)

I love this journal! Adds more depth to her poetic height! There are approximately 35 issues (or numbers) and so I have a lot to read! And of what I have read in it so far, this has to be one of the very best decisions that I've ever made with my money. She is absolutely fascinating to me. I want to read everything she wrote, said, and everything written about her.

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I'm lucky to find 10 minutes per day to read. I would love to read for at least an hour or so per day, but where do some of you find the time? I get up, go to work, come home, workout, shower, cook dinner, clean up after dinner, then go to bed and do it over again. I tend to catch up a bit on the weekends, but between laundry, running errands and other household type crap, even then I only find a few minutes to an hour on Saturdays and Sundays. And now I'm having to cram in American Idol too! :dough:

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I'm lucky to find 10 minutes per day to read.

The only time I don't really read is when I'm on a writing purge. It is excruciating for me to not to have the time to write when I want to write, or when I want to read, it's always interrupted by having to do things, like work, or make food, or whatnot. I hare having to work my writing/reading schedule around my work schedule. So I just bring it along with me, and found creative ways to enjoy reading while working or writing, though they take on a different form: audiobooks/lectures and using my digi voice recorder when a thought comes along. It helps, but it's still a poor substitute, which I can't always do there. I also disappear on my any of my breaks at work, and read or write frantically.

I would love to read for at least an hour or so per day

My fantasy is to be able to read or write nonstop for as long as I want to without having any interruptions. I just enjoyed a bit of that fantasy yesterday. I finally took a paid day off and read for at least 12 hours or so. Spent quality time with Sara and Emily's words and words about Emily.

but where do some of you find the time? I get up, go to work, come home, workout, shower, cook dinner, clean up after dinner, then go to bed and do it over again.

I don't workout or regularly shower, so that frees time for me. I use very little dishes, I own/use only one spoon and one glass and one glass bakedish, and use paper towels for everything, I don't talk on the phone, nor go out, and if I do go out it's only to work, get food, get books. Last year I almost ended up in the hospital from exhaustion, and had elevated blood pressure, and have trained myself to be able to endure even more since then. I don't drink coffee, takes too long to wash and prepare the coffe maker, saving time too. Tea is fine. Hot water from the tap, its almost hot enough for the tea, just microwave it for a bit, and done. I do not drive far at all like before, that saves time, don't have to get gas much (every other month), that saves time. Basically I shaved off all the excess, including some people, to make more room for characters, books, and my writing. I work on average about 114 hours a pay (bi-weekly), so I must be very careful with the precious time I have and it's hard won.

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Yes, fortunately there are many that I did like.

Since you are dropping lists, I may as well post mine. I began this list in July of last year, after OCON. Here is what I read since then:

Fiction

--------

Quo Vadis by Sienkiewicz

The Toilers of the Sea by Hugo

The Scarlet Letter by Hawthorne

The Sun Also Rises by Hemingway

The Road by McCarthy

Pride & Prejudice by Austen

Northanger Abbey by Austen

Notre-Dame de Paris by Hugo

The Miser by Moliere

The Would-be Gentleman by Moliere

Don Juan by Moliere

That Scoundrel Scapin by Moliere

Notes from Underground by Dostoevsky

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Winterson

Sparrowhawk Book One: Jack Frake by Cline

Hard Times by Dickens

Mrs. Dalloway by Woolf

Remains of the Day by Ishiguro

Bartleby the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street by Melville

Candide by Voltaire

The Sea Gull by Chekov

Non-Fiction

--------

Infidel by Ayaan Hirsi Ali

Poetics by Aristotle

The Truth About Muhammad by Spencer

The Virtuosi: Classical Music's Great Performers by Schonberg

The Last Days of Socrates: Euthyphro; The Apology; Crito; and Phaedo by Plato

The Worldly Philosophers: The Great Economic Thinkers by Heilbroner

Becoming Mona Lisa by Sassoon

Existentialism: From Dostoevsky to Sarte by Kaufmann

Existentialism is a Humanism by Sartre

The Romantic Manifesto by Rand

The Age of Turbulence by Greenspan

For the New Intellectual by Rand

The Art of Non-Fiction by Rand

The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire by Gibbon

Moneyball by Lewis

Fatherhood by Cosby

Michelangelo's David: A Search for Identity by Seymour, Jr.

The Montessori Method by Montessori

Studies in Iconology: Humanistic Themes in the Art of the Renaissance by Panofsky

How to Read and Why by Bloom

Poetry

--------

The Love Poems of Lord Byron by Byron

Selected Poems by Whitman

+ several unimportant singular passages from compiled volumes.

Edited by adrock3215
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I actually made a list of what I read from in '08. I had a major reading binge last year, most I ever read, lots of good quotes among them, but also some really horrible poetry like most of the contemporary free verse poetry I read, but here's my list, not sure how many:

Kay Nolte Smith's A Tale of the Wind(still haven't finished last 1/4)

...

Inside by Kenneth J. Harvey

[Note: besides that time off, I rarely take off a day of work; I worked the last eight months at the hopital with only 2 days off during it, and that was one weekvnd last summer, because I had to take off to get paid for 2 holidays that I workvd.]

That is a lot of intellectual ammo! I am so sorry about the pun. If I keep feeling bad maybe I'll edit it out later. :) Seriously, that's impressive. You're a machine. Even at my most hungry, I don't think I could read at that rate. I'm curious how long you've kept that pace and whether or not, in that time, you have noticed a change in your retention, good or bad.

For my part, I read 2-4 hours a day. About half are articles related to businesses or news. The other half is currently being split between Brothers Karamozov, The Creature from Jekyll Island, and The Selfish Gene. I have always had to have 3-6 books going to keep my interest up.

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Seriously, that's impressive. You're a machine. Even at my most hungry, I don't think I could read at that rate.

My literary passions have taught me how to read fast and my hunger only grows! I can't seem to put enough on my plate!

I'm curious how long you've kept that pace and whether or not, in that time, you have noticed a change in your retention, good or bad.

Well, usually I don't keep a record of what read, but I did directly by posting what I am currently reading on a literature forum and I thought one night that I wanted to go through that thread and see what I read for a year, since I knew I had read a lot more than ever, and then I compiled the list. I really have only read and written like this, in the last (almost) three years now, incrementally increasing through my passion and desire not only how much I read and write, but also the quality of my writing, during those years. I have matured literarily very rapidly. That is why my birthday in my profile is so young - it's my rebirthday. That's the very day it all started, my new literary life. I owe my entire literary life to what took place on that day forward. I raised myself though.

But as far as retention goes, what was of any literary worth during my reading, or of some personal significance to me, was not lost. I wrote it all down, or highlighted/marked it up, if it's my copy. But I can make comparisons, all kinds of connections, personal ones especially and broadening my literary horizons, has opened up so much to me as a writer, and I can also see where I stand in it.

And now I'm having to cram in American Idol too! :)

And to expand further, I don't watch TV, so that frees up time, too and it's gotten to be so [crossout]bad[/crossout] good that I can't even watch DVD's anymore. I checked one out on on Verdi's ernani, with Pavarotti in it, after reading Hugo's Hernani, and barely watched 30 minutes of it, and even renewed it like six times from the library during that time, and also recently The Secret Garden and I renewed that 2-3 times and have yet to even open it! I end up just turning them in, and this last one proves that I shouldn't even try anymore. I can't watch, I must read, I must write! Oh, and I do all of my food shopping late at night after my shift ends at the hospital, so it's quicker to get there, not many people, and the wonderful self-checkout line allows me the freedom of not having to wait for a cashier to come to a register, talking about stupid shit like the weather, or having to wait for them to bag my food, and hear the obligatory phrases that are fucking annoying.

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Notre-Dame de Paris by Hugo

Ah, the proper title, if I remember right. When I said that to a person they didn't know what I was talking about, then I said it's "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" then they say "Oh, OK."

The Miser by Moliere

The Would-be Gentleman by Moliere

Don Juan by Moliere

That Scoundrel Scapin by Moliere

Who's the translator? I read Don Juan, and liked it, esp. for the language. But it has to be a Donald M. Frame's translation. Some of Moliere's plays are verse ones like The School for Husband's (which is my favorite of his that I have read so far), but another translation I was looking at, wasn't in such a verse form and did not at all appeal to me after having read Frame's first. The School for Wives ranks as second favorite of mine that I've read.

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Winterson

Her Gut Symmetries book was the first time I encountered female homosexuality in literature. I have my own take on just why it occured in the novel, which I think is the real reason why. I liked this one of hers some, ever read it?

Sparrowhawk Book One: Jack Frake by Cline

:)

Edited by intellectualammo
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  • 10 months later...

Tonight I made a list of what I read so far this year.

My list for 2009, not sure if it is as long as my list in this thread for 2008 or not:

but here it is:

The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett introduced by Sophie Dahl

Narcissus and Goldmund by Herman Hesse

Inside the Secret Garden A Treasury of Crafts, Recipes, and Activities by Carolyn Strom Collins and Christina Wyss Eriksson

The Practical Cogitator The Thinkers Anthology selected and edited by Charlvs P. Curtis, Jr. and Ferris Greenlet

Becoming a Writer by Dorthea Brande, foreward by John Gardner

Pegasus Pulls a Hack Memoirs of a Modern Minstrel by Berton Braley

Gone With The Wind authored by Margaret Mitchell and preface by Pat Conroy

Sara Teasdale's poetry collection titled Love Songs

Flame and Sword a poetry collection by Sara Teasdale

Rivers to the Sea a poetry collection by Sara Teasdale

The Letters of Emily Dickinson edited by Thomas H. Johnson (Volume 1)

Sara Teasdale's Dark of the Moon

Sara Teasdale's Stars To-night

Sara Teasdale's Strange Victory

Rainbow Gold Poems Old and New Selected For Boys And Girls (selected by) by Sara Teasdale With Illustrations by Dugald Walker

The Letters of Emily Dickinson Volume #2 edited by Thomas H. Johnson

Treasury of Love Poems by Adam Mickiewicz, compiled and edited by Krystyna S. Olszer

Pan Tadeusz or The Last Foray in Lithuania by Adam Mickiewicz, translated by Watson Kirkconnell with an introductory essay by Dr. William J. Rose and notes by Professor Harold B. Segel

Selected Poetry and Prose of Adam Mickiewicz Centenary Commemorative edition, edited, with an introduction by Stanislaw Helsztynski

Polish Greats by Arnold Madison

Polish Romantic Drama Three Plays in English Translation, selected and edited by Harold B. Segel

Adam Mickiewicz by David Welsh

Laments by Jan Kochanowski translated by Stanislaw Baranczak and Seamus Heaney

Jan Kochanowski by David Welsh

Stephen King's UR

Edward Cline's Sparrowhawk Companion book (to his Sparrowhawk Series)

An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (the magnum opus) of Adam Smith's

Edith Wharton's The Hermit and the Wild Woman And Other Stories

Anne of Green Gables, by Lucy Maud Montgomery

Anne of Avonlea by Lucy Maud Montgomery

Truancy Origins by Isamu Fukui

Henry Hazlitt's Economics in One Lesson

Anne of the Island by L. M. Montgomery

The Daughter of a Magnate by Frank H. Spearman

The Story Girl by L.M. Montgomery

Lucy Maud Montgomery Short Stories, 1896 to 1901 by Lucy Maud Montgomery, published in 1901

Ayn Rand's Normative Ethics: The Virtuous Egoist by Tara Smith

What Narcissism Means To Me poems by Tony Hoagland

When The Perfect Partner Goes Perfectly Wrong: Loving or Leaving the Narcissist in your Life by Mary Jo Fay

Help! I'm in love with a Narcissist written by both Steven Carter & Julia Sokol

Lucy Maud Montgomery Short Stories, 1902 to 1903, by Lucy Maud Montgomery , published in 1903

The Culture of Narcissism by Christopher Lasch

Lucy Maud Montgomery Short Stories, 1904 by Lucy Maud Montgomery

Your Own True Love: The new positive view of narcissism; The person you love the most should be...you, by Richard C. Robertiello, M.D.

Identifying and Understanding the Narcissistic Personality Disorder by Elsa F. Ronningstam

The Beautiful and Damned by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Prisoners of Childhood by Alice Miller

When You Love a Man Who Loves Himself by W. Keith Campbell

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

Trapped in the Mirror adult children of narcissists and their struggle for self, by Elan Golomb, Ph.D

Man's Aggression the defense of the self by Gregory Rochlin, M.D.

Echo and Narcissus One Act Play by Gerald P. Murphy

The Portable Nietzsche by Walter Kaufmann

Aria Da Capo by Edna St. Vincent Millay (a play in one act)

The Lamp and the Bell by Edna St. Vincent Millay (a drama in five acts)

General William Booth Enters into Heaven - and other poems, by Vachel Lindsay

The Chinese Nightingale and Other Poems by Vachel Lindsay

The Book-Bills of Narcissus by Richard Le Gallienne

Hawthorn and Lavender with other verses by William Ernest Henley

The Song of the Sword and Other Verses by W.E. Henley

The Virgin Suicides by Jeffery Eugenides

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

Vachel Lindsay his The Congo and Other Poems

Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

An Ideal Husband by Oscar Wilde

The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus w/translations by Sir Richard Burton

Master and Man by Leo Tolstoy the translators, Louise and Aylmer Maude

Androcles and the Lion by George Bernard Shaw

Henrik Ibsen by Edmund Gosse

Love's Comedy by Henrik Ibsen translated by H.C.Herford

The Rebellion of Margaret by Geraldine Mockler

Early Plays by Henrik Ibsen (included Cataline, The Warrior's Barrow, Olaf Liljekrans) translated from the Norwegian by Anders Orbeck, A.M.

Arnold Bennett's book titled Hugo: A Fantasia on Modern Themes

Lyrics of Earth by Archibald Lampman

Alcylone by Archibald Lampman

Among the Millet and Other Poems by Archibald Lampman

Victor Hugo's The Man Who Laughs

Malignant Self Love by Sam Vaknin

Pygmalion's Spectacles by Stanley Grauman Weinbaum

Sappho: One Hundred Lyrics by Bliss Carmen

Liber Amoris, or The New Pygmalion written by William Hazlitt

Imaginary Friends by Yolanda Jackson

Th1rteen R3asons Why by Jay Asher

Kate Chopin's The Awakening & Selected Short Stories

The Doll and Her Friends, or Memoirs of the Lady Seraphina published in 1853, but the author of it is unknown...

The Collected Poems [of] Sylvia Plath, edited by Ted Hughes

The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath

The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath, edited by Karen V. Kukil

Sylvia Plath: A Literary Life, written by Linda Wagner-Martin

Sylvia Plath: A Biography written by Linda W. Wagner-Martin

Her Husband: Hughes and Plath - A Marriage, written by Diane Middlebrook

Wintering: A novel of [about] Sylvia Plath written by Kate Moses

Divine Madness: Ten Stories of Creative Struggles by Jefferey A. Kottler

To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

A Room of One's Own by Virginia Woolf

Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

Introvert Power: Why Your Inner Life Is Your Hidden Strength, by Laurie Helgoe Ph.D.

The Waves by Virginia Woolf

Ted Hughes Collected Poems, edited by Paul Keegan

Virginia Woolf: An Inner Life by Julia Briggs

Sylvia Plath: Method and Madness, Edward Butscher

Anne Sexton written by Diane Wood Middlebrook

Johnny Panic and the Bible of Dreams, Sylvia Plath

Anne Sexton: The Complete Poems, edited by her friend Maxine Kumin

The Art of Sylvia Plath, A Symposium, edited by Charles Newman

Letters Home by Sylvia Plath Correspondence 1950-1963, selected and edited with commentary by Aurelia Schober Plath

also throughout I have read these Emily Dickinson Journals:

Volume 6, Number 2, Fall 1997 (currently reading this one)

Volume 6, Number 1, Spring 1997

Volume 5, Number 2, Fall 1996

Volume 5, Number 1, Spring 1996

Volume 4, Number 2, Fall 1995

Volume 4, Number 1, Spring 1995

Volume 3, Number 2, Fall 1994

Volume 3, Number 1, Spring 1994

Volume 2, Number 2, Fall 1993

Volume 2, Number 1, Spring 1993

Volume 1, Number 2, Fall 1992

Volume 1, Number 1, Spring 1992

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Tonight I made a list of what I read so far this year.

My list for 2009, not sure if it is as long as my list in this thread for 2008 or not:

but here it is:

The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett introduced by Sophie Dahl

Narcissus and Goldmund by Herman Hesse

Inside the Secret Garden A Treasury of Crafts, Recipes, and Activities by Carolyn Strom Collins and Christina Wyss Eriksson

The Practical Cogitator The Thinkers Anthology selected and edited by Charlvs P. Curtis, Jr. and Ferris Greenlet

Becoming a Writer by Dorthea Brande, foreward by John Gardner

Pegasus Pulls a Hack Memoirs of a Modern Minstrel by Berton Braley

Gone With The Wind authored by Margaret Mitchell and preface by Pat Conroy

Sara Teasdale's poetry collection titled Love Songs

Flame and Sword a poetry collection by Sara Teasdale

Rivers to the Sea a poetry collection by Sara Teasdale

The Letters of Emily Dickinson edited by Thomas H. Johnson (Volume 1)

Sara Teasdale's Dark of the Moon

Sara Teasdale's Stars To-night

Sara Teasdale's Strange Victory

Rainbow Gold Poems Old and New Selected For Boys And Girls (selected by) by Sara Teasdale With Illustrations by Dugald Walker

The Letters of Emily Dickinson Volume #2 edited by Thomas H. Johnson

Treasury of Love Poems by Adam Mickiewicz, compiled and edited by Krystyna S. Olszer

Pan Tadeusz or The Last Foray in Lithuania by Adam Mickiewicz, translated by Watson Kirkconnell with an introductory essay by Dr. William J. Rose and notes by Professor Harold B. Segel

Selected Poetry and Prose of Adam Mickiewicz Centenary Commemorative edition, edited, with an introduction by Stanislaw Helsztynski

Polish Greats by Arnold Madison

Polish Romantic Drama Three Plays in English Translation, selected and edited by Harold B. Segel

Adam Mickiewicz by David Welsh

Laments by Jan Kochanowski translated by Stanislaw Baranczak and Seamus Heaney

Jan Kochanowski by David Welsh

Stephen King's UR

Edward Cline's Sparrowhawk Companion book (to his Sparrowhawk Series)

An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (the magnum opus) of Adam Smith's

Edith Wharton's The Hermit and the Wild Woman And Other Stories

Anne of Green Gables, by Lucy Maud Montgomery

Anne of Avonlea by Lucy Maud Montgomery

Truancy Origins by Isamu Fukui

Henry Hazlitt's Economics in One Lesson

Anne of the Island by L. M. Montgomery

The Daughter of a Magnate by Frank H. Spearman

The Story Girl by L.M. Montgomery

Lucy Maud Montgomery Short Stories, 1896 to 1901 by Lucy Maud Montgomery, published in 1901

Ayn Rand's Normative Ethics: The Virtuous Egoist by Tara Smith

What Narcissism Means To Me poems by Tony Hoagland

When The Perfect Partner Goes Perfectly Wrong: Loving or Leaving the Narcissist in your Life by Mary Jo Fay

Help! I'm in love with a Narcissist written by both Steven Carter & Julia Sokol

Lucy Maud Montgomery Short Stories, 1902 to 1903, by Lucy Maud Montgomery , published in 1903

The Culture of Narcissism by Christopher Lasch

Lucy Maud Montgomery Short Stories, 1904 by Lucy Maud Montgomery

Your Own True Love: The new positive view of narcissism; The person you love the most should be...you, by Richard C. Robertiello, M.D.

Identifying and Understanding the Narcissistic Personality Disorder by Elsa F. Ronningstam

The Beautiful and Damned by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Prisoners of Childhood by Alice Miller

When You Love a Man Who Loves Himself by W. Keith Campbell

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

Trapped in the Mirror adult children of narcissists and their struggle for self, by Elan Golomb, Ph.D

Man's Aggression the defense of the self by Gregory Rochlin, M.D.

Echo and Narcissus One Act Play by Gerald P. Murphy

The Portable Nietzsche by Walter Kaufmann

Aria Da Capo by Edna St. Vincent Millay (a play in one act)

The Lamp and the Bell by Edna St. Vincent Millay (a drama in five acts)

General William Booth Enters into Heaven - and other poems, by Vachel Lindsay

The Chinese Nightingale and Other Poems by Vachel Lindsay

The Book-Bills of Narcissus by Richard Le Gallienne

Hawthorn and Lavender with other verses by William Ernest Henley

The Song of the Sword and Other Verses by W.E. Henley

The Virgin Suicides by Jeffery Eugenides

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

Vachel Lindsay his The Congo and Other Poems

Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

An Ideal Husband by Oscar Wilde

The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus w/translations by Sir Richard Burton

Master and Man by Leo Tolstoy the translators, Louise and Aylmer Maude

Androcles and the Lion by George Bernard Shaw

Henrik Ibsen by Edmund Gosse

Love's Comedy by Henrik Ibsen translated by H.C.Herford

The Rebellion of Margaret by Geraldine Mockler

Early Plays by Henrik Ibsen (included Cataline, The Warrior's Barrow, Olaf Liljekrans) translated from the Norwegian by Anders Orbeck, A.M.

Arnold Bennett's book titled Hugo: A Fantasia on Modern Themes

Lyrics of Earth by Archibald Lampman

Alcylone by Archibald Lampman

Among the Millet and Other Poems by Archibald Lampman

Victor Hugo's The Man Who Laughs

Malignant Self Love by Sam Vaknin

Pygmalion's Spectacles by Stanley Grauman Weinbaum

Sappho: One Hundred Lyrics by Bliss Carmen

Liber Amoris, or The New Pygmalion written by William Hazlitt

Imaginary Friends by Yolanda Jackson

Th1rteen R3asons Why by Jay Asher

Kate Chopin's The Awakening & Selected Short Stories

The Doll and Her Friends, or Memoirs of the Lady Seraphina published in 1853, but the author of it is unknown...

The Collected Poems [of] Sylvia Plath, edited by Ted Hughes

The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath

The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath, edited by Karen V. Kukil

Sylvia Plath: A Literary Life, written by Linda Wagner-Martin

Sylvia Plath: A Biography written by Linda W. Wagner-Martin

Her Husband: Hughes and Plath - A Marriage, written by Diane Middlebrook

Wintering: A novel of [about] Sylvia Plath written by Kate Moses

Divine Madness: Ten Stories of Creative Struggles by Jefferey A. Kottler

To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

A Room of One's Own by Virginia Woolf

Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

Introvert Power: Why Your Inner Life Is Your Hidden Strength, by Laurie Helgoe Ph.D.

The Waves by Virginia Woolf

Ted Hughes Collected Poems, edited by Paul Keegan

Virginia Woolf: An Inner Life by Julia Briggs

Sylvia Plath: Method and Madness, Edward Butscher

Anne Sexton written by Diane Wood Middlebrook

Johnny Panic and the Bible of Dreams, Sylvia Plath

Anne Sexton: The Complete Poems, edited by her friend Maxine Kumin

The Art of Sylvia Plath, A Symposium, edited by Charles Newman

Letters Home by Sylvia Plath Correspondence 1950-1963, selected and edited with commentary by Aurelia Schober Plath

also throughout I have read these Emily Dickinson Journals:

Volume 6, Number 2, Fall 1997 (currently reading this one)

Volume 6, Number 1, Spring 1997

Volume 5, Number 2, Fall 1996

Volume 5, Number 1, Spring 1996

Volume 4, Number 2, Fall 1995

Volume 4, Number 1, Spring 1995

Volume 3, Number 2, Fall 1994

Volume 3, Number 1, Spring 1994

Volume 2, Number 2, Fall 1993

Volume 2, Number 1, Spring 1993

Volume 1, Number 2, Fall 1992

Volume 1, Number 1, Spring 1992

thats a mountain of books :o

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thats a mountain of books :o

It sure is! I was on another reading binge this year. My Kindle 2 helped me out this year, by reading some of those to me while I was working, but I haven't had it read to me in a while. Many of the books I had to read and handwrite many many pages of passages, quotes, and notes on. I probably could have read even more if I had Kindle edition copies of them! :o The Dickinson Journals, there are about 30 some more that I am working my way through. Scholarly written and worth every price I pay when renewing my online account with Project Muse, published through Johns Hopkins University Press. Since I think we can print them out on our own, I copy and paste them, make a notepad file of each volume and transfer it onto my Kindle. This really was the reason why I had bought it, to read the EDJ. Easier on my eyes than on my laptop screen! Reading binges are nearly all the time with me, and about once a year, sometime, don't know when, a writing purge hits me hard! Had one hit April May in 2008 and then recently a few months ago. But I have still been writing fairly reguarly sinc ethe last one. A nice balance right now, where I always wanted to be.

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I try to keep a book for leisure and a book that applies to my career/constructive interests. Currently I am rereading The Count of Monte Cristo and the second largest book in my collection: Security Analysis. It's a beast.

I currently try to read about an hour and a half to two hours a day not including school work. The time I read on the weekend depends largely on how busy I am.

Security Analysis by Benjamin Graham I hope?

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Your turn...

I get about 2 hours worth of reading done in a day. In the morning, I read for school (most recently Principles of Microeconomics, Mankiw et al.) and I read The Economist while taking public transit. For fun, I'm currently reading What the Dog Saw by Malcolm Gladwell.

Also Barack Obama reads 95 books a year, I don't care what anyone says that is quite a load of books! Dummy he is not.

I disagree with your assumption. It all depends on what books are read. There are many books (anything by Naomi Klein, for instance) that keep dummies dumb. Obama's reading comprehension may be through the roof but that doesn't mean there's any wisdom to his ideas.

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