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Reading a story because it has Objectivist values...

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DragonMaci
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... would you do it?  

41 members have voted

  1. 1. Would you reading a fiction novel or short story of a genre or topic you don't usually read if it had Objectivist values

    • I would read it if it had Objectivist values
      9
    • I would consider it and decide on a case-by-case basis
      28
    • I wouldn't read it
      0


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I just about never read fiction books that are set in a completely realistic setting. Typically, they don't intrigue me. However, After reading Anthem by Rand I liked her view point and writing enough to go on to eagerly read The Fountainhead after that. Her theme and characters were still unique and compelling enough to make the story really good and enjoyable for me to read even though it had a setting which usually makes for stories that don't interest me much. So, though I do not think just any and every story could interest me just for having good values in it, depending on how it is done on a case by case basis, it may be possible for them to be really enjoyable for me in genres which normally wouldn't be.

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I think the middle option is the only reasonable option presented. If a book has Objectivist values, and assuming you agree with them, it seems silly to not consider reading it even if it is in a genre you do not usually like. It is silly to automatically say yes just because it has Objectivist values.

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What do you mean by "Objectivist values"?

I enjoy reading a story because it's compelling and I like the author's way with words. I never, ever, read to be instructed in how I ought to live my life.

Of course, a story has to embody some values that I agree with, if it's to hold my interest.

My best advice: Write what interests you personally. Don't concern yourself with preaching any particular ideology, and do not ever write to reach (impress) any particular group of people.

I've seen many examples of so-called "Objectivist art," and much of it is dreadful.

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I never, ever, read to be instructed in how I ought to live my life.

Don't concern yourself with preaching any particular ideology

I didn't mean it like that. I mean a story where at least the main characters act on Objectivist values - or even most of society.

and do not ever write to reach (impress) any particular group of people.

I don't. I was just trying to get a curiosity answered.

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Just out of curiosity, how would I know what the story is about unless I read it first.

The synopsis on the back of the book or on the inside of the dust sleeve. Or skimming it. Or reading reviews. Or being told by someone whom has similar book interests and whom you trust.

Also, what are Objectivist values exactly within a story?

The same as they are in life.

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Okay. So you ask me, "Do you want to read a story about an honest man?" How can I decide on such little information? "Objectivist Value" is a tad to abstract. For the most part, the books I read have honest characters.

Let me put in another way. Toystoy's War and Peace has plenty of honest characters. Yet I for the life of me couldn't make it beyond 20 pages.

t

Edited by claire
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Would you read a book simply because one of your friends told you it has Objectivist values?

What kinds of things do you look for when considering a book for reading?

How often do you venture outside of your preferred genres? Would the recommendation of a good friend cause you to read something outside your genre?

Or do you completely disregard the recommendations of your friends?

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I think the middle option is the only reasonable option presented. If a book has Objectivist values, and assuming you agree with them, it seems silly to not consider reading it even if it is in a genre you do not usually like. It is silly to automatically say yes just because it has Objectivist values.

This is pretty much what I was thinking too.

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There aren't many that fit in this 'sub-genre' anyway - Kay Nolte Smith, Erika Holzer, Edward Cline, Shelley Reuben, and Gen LaGreca come first to mind, tho there are several others who are inspired by her writings, to one extent or another [David Gulbraa, Alexandra York, L.Neil Smith, F. Paul Wilson, Dennis Hardin, and James Hogan for examples]... seeing how they write would best clue to what may be considered 'Objectivist values' and how to go about writing them in fiction...

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