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The original Karate Kid (and its remakes) were classic films, which is why they have stood the test of time. Today's remakes have little to do with the original inspirations behind the films. The original Karate Kid was a "coming of age movie", which had Karate as a means to set the characters in motion. The casting was brilliant, Morita was the old, unassuming teacher that imparted more than just how to block with his famous "wax on-wax off" lesson. Macchio was the perfect teen counterpart - he was every teen, not one with super human or special effects induced skills. The original focused on development of the movie characters, not the action - and it is the simple basics of Macchio's Karate that made his character work and be strong against the more highly skilled Cobra Kai team.

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I'll admit I hardly remember the original Karate Kid movie, but the new one I can say is not a bad watch. It has its ups and downs. The 'bad' characters are not much display of anything other than obedience and no mercy-or no justice. I think it portrayed the kid's adversity fairly well-by the end the inspiration sets in and he becomes a sort of self-made hero. The love story is more cute than to be taken seriously with children. The master (Jackie Chan) is a character in struggle to move from his past and finds a route in teaching the kid. I enjoyed the movie. :thumbsup:

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I'll admit I hardly remember the original Karate Kid movie, but the new one I can say is not a bad watch. It has its ups and downs. The 'bad' characters are not much display of anything other than obedience and no mercy-or no justice. I think it portrayed the kid's adversity fairly well-by the end the inspiration sets in and he becomes a sort of self-made hero. The love story is more cute than to be taken seriously with children. The master (Jackie Chan) is a character in struggle to move from his past and finds a route in teaching the kid. I enjoyed the movie. :thumbsup:

Karate is Japanese, not Chinese. A minor point to the film makers obviously. but not to me.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Karate is Japanese, not Chinese. A minor point to the film makers obviously. but not to me.

You couldn't be more wrong. Karate originally meant "Chinese hand" in Classical Japanese because it was a form of martial arts adopted *from China.* Later, in modern Japan, the name Karate was changed to mean "empty hand" in an attempt to de-Sino-fy the word and make Karate more popular among modern Japanese. Kara = archaic Japanese for "China," and another homophonic kanji character kara = empty.

Now yes, Karate is now considered Japanese and it has made its own developments in Japan. But it originally came from China, period.

Also, the new movie sucks. That little kid Smith looks like he's hopped up on steroids. No 10 year old should be ripped. That's just frightening and disgusting.

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Karate originally meant "Chinese hand" in Classical Japanese because it was a form of martial arts adopted *from China.* Later, in modern Japan, the name Karate was changed to mean "empty hand" in an attempt to de-Sino-fy the word and make Karate more popular among modern Japanese. Kara = archaic Japanese for "China," and another homophonic kanji character kara = empty.

This is true, however, the original poster was not incorrect. Martial arts from China were combined with local fighting arts on Okinawa and from there, developed their own distinct forms - which were later taken to mainland Japan by Sensei Funakoshi who developed and popularised the Shotokan style. Karate is a distinctly Japanese martial art. :ninja:

Also, the film is not out yet in the UK (28th July) but it appears that he is actually taught kung-fu a Chinese discipline, rather than karate anyway http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Karate_Kid_(2010_film).

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  • 1 month later...

Karate is Japanese, not Chinese. A minor point to the film makers obviously. but not to me.

You couldn't be more wrong. Karate originally meant "Chinese hand" in Classical Japanese because it was a form of martial arts adopted *from China.* Later, in modern Japan, the name Karate was changed to mean "empty hand" in an attempt to de-Sino-fy the word and make Karate more popular among modern Japanese. Kara = archaic Japanese for "China," and another homophonic kanji character kara = empty.

Now yes, Karate is now considered Japanese and it has made its own developments in Japan. But it originally came from China, period.

This is true, however, the original poster was not incorrect. Martial arts from China were combined with local fighting arts on Okinawa and from there, developed their own distinct forms - which were later taken to mainland Japan by Sensei Funakoshi who developed and popularised the Shotokan style. Karate is a distinctly Japanese martial art. :ninja:

Actually, Karate was developed in the Ryūkyū Kingdom, not in China or Japan. The Ryūkyū Kingdom just happens to have been situated on a group of islands that today are part of Japan. (it was formally annexed by Japan in 1872, and its territory is now called Okinawa).

Karate was adopted by the Japanese in the 1920s, and since then it has been regarded as a Japanese martial art. As such, it has spread to Korea (by Koreans who have visited Japan), to the US (by servicemen stationed in Okinawa), and a few other western countries.

As for the movie, I haven't seen it, but according to this article Jackie Chan's character actually teaches the kid kung fu (which makes sense if they're in China), not karate. Kung fu, the martial art Chan does in all his movies, is a more spectacular but far less effective fighting style than the more economical karate. Here's a video of a karate vs. kung fu fight, to illustrate the difference:

(Note how the karate fighters never leave the ground - the ground is where you want to be, if you plan on having any leverage behind your strikes. You should only learn how to jump around Jackie Chan style if your aim is to get your ass kicked in spectacular fashion :) )

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Also, the new movie sucks. That little kid Smith looks like he's hopped up on steroids. No 10 year old should be ripped. That's just frightening and disgusting.

Body building, if done properly, while not a health necessity for most preteens and teens (unless they are overweight), is almost always a good idea. It adds confidence, improves abilities in various sports (including martial arts), and most importantly it starts off the child on the road to a healthy, disciplined lifestyle.

And, contrary to popular belief, it has absolutely no drawbacks.

Edited by Jake_Ellison
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Body building, if done properly, while not a health necessity for most preteens and teens (unless they are overweight), is almost always a good idea. It adds confidence, improves abilities in various sports (including martial arts), and most importantly it starts off the child on the road to a healthy, disciplined lifestyle.

And, contrary to popular belief, it has absolutely no drawbacks.

I could not agree more, training in a martial art is brilliant for children - and adults. I am grading for my 4th kyu in Shotokan later this month, I've been training for over a year, it has done me the world of good, I could not recommend it enough.

Not sure what you mean by body-building though, young kids should not be lifting weights as their bones are not strong enough.

Edited by rebelconservative
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Jake, your example video shows what appears to be Drunken Style vs. what appears to be Shotokan. I practiced Pai Lum (White Dragon) style for many years, taking instruction directly from Grand Master Daniel K. Pai during special workshops when he was here from Okinawa. In the Pai Lum system, we first learned Kenpo (Okinawan Karate). We would, at least once a year, get together with the local Wado-Ryu Karate Dojo and have a day of sparring. We usually kicked their asses. :ninja:

So, I would not generalize as to the superiority of Japanese Karate from that video. ;)

Edited by Maximus
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Not sure what you mean by body-building though, young kids should not be lifting weights as their bones are not strong enough.

This is incorrect. It's an old myth that just refuses to die. Usually it's claimed that the growth plates (epiphyseal plates) of the bones can be damaged, causing growth deformities. Such injuries are not uncommon among children(who are indeed at greater risk), but fractures causing growth deformities are rare - especially if the fracture is treated properly. The notion that lifting weights at a young age is dangerous is, on the other hand, completely ludicrous. Weight lifting, performed properly, should not put such high amount of force on the bones. Playing sports, jumping, and running around - as children tend to do every day - produces a lot more force than weight lifting(running for example produces around 3 times body weight in force, so as a comparison... how many children could squat, or even leg press, that amount of weight?).

If this was a valid concern growth deformities would be much more common in children, and they should first of all be prohibited from doing activities that are considered normal - like playing sports.

On the contrary, weight lifting - properly done - will more likely have benefits like preventing injuries. It will strengthen muscles, tendons, ligaments and bones. It's especially beneficial before entering an adult age as the body adapts much faster, carrying over the benefits into adulthood.

(And in case anyone likes to bring up Chinese gymnasts, or indeed any children under extreme diet and exercise regimes, where natural growth has stoppe: This is because they don't enter puberty properly, but once ceasing the madness they'll hit puberty and start growing)

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  • 3 months later...

The original Karate Kid (and its remakes) were classic films, which is why they have stood the test of time. Today's remakes have little to do with the original inspirations behind the films. The original Karate Kid was a "coming of age movie", which had Karate as a means to set the characters in motion. The casting was brilliant, Morita was the old, unassuming teacher that imparted more than just how to block with his famous "wax on-wax off" lesson. Macchio was the perfect teen counterpart - he was every teen, not one with super human or special effects induced skills. The original focused on development of the movie characters, not the action - and it is the simple basics of Macchio's Karate that made his character work and be strong against the more highly skilled Cobra Kai team.

Oh I thought it was the "jacket on, jacket off" lesson. I really like the quote "There is no such thing as a bad student".

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