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Greatest Movie You Have Ever Seen

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The main character pursued his goals through the entire movie whether accepted or not. At the end of the movie, there was no explanation for his life.

Sure there was. His later years were solitary and miserable because he had failed at winning the one thing he wanted above all, the adoration of the public.

I thought it was a bad movie since pursuing your own goals amounted to nothing.

The movie did not imply that pursuing rational goals amounts to nothing. Kane was unhappy because the only esteem he thought worthy was social esteem.

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When this thread was active, about 9 months ago, I used the recommendations here (and from elsewhere) to start a list of recommended movies in the Wiki.

Since then we've had many new members and a few new movies. If a movie you like is not listed in the Wiki list, you could either update the Wiki or add to this thread.

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My top, off the top of my head, are The Last of The Mohicans, Braveheart, Life Is Beautiful, October Sky, The Emporer's Club, The Pianist, The Natural, and The Count of Monte Cristo. Serpico is really good too.

-Grant

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I like many classical moves (e.g. Casablanca), but I wanted to list more recent ones. I haven't numbered them because I'm not sure of the order (but Serenity will be close to the very top).

- . Serenity / Firefly

- . Akeelah and the Bee

- . Rob Roy

- . Chocolat

- . Witness

- . Dr. No

- . Groundhog Day

- . Back to the Future (1)

- . City Slickers (1)

- . Antz

- . The Incredibles

- . V for Vendetta

- . House (the TV series)

- . 24 (the TV series)

Edited by thefigure
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On Objectivist perspective I do love MONTY PYTHON'S The LIfe of Brian

Here are some related Clips:

The Stoning

Sermon on the Mount

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XiDmMBIyfsU

(blessed are the cheesemakers) ^_^

The People's Front

The Prophets (Ayn Rand must have loved these one)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OHYo66X9a7A

We are All Individuals !!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2T1LIrzsgqA

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I'm not sure if this has been brought up yet or not, I didn't re-read the entire 9 page thread, but I watched Blazing Saddles last night for what must have been the 4th or 5th time and it's so funny. It's just a classic. I don't think Hollywood would even allow something like it nowadays.

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I'm not sure if this has been brought up yet or not, I didn't re-read the entire 9 page thread, but I watched Blazing Saddles last night for what must have been the 4th or 5th time and it's so funny. It's just a classic. I don't think Hollywood would even allow something like it nowadays.

These days? Surely not. Can you imagine the following exchange taking place today?

Bart: Are we awake?

Jim: We're not sure. Are we... black?

Bart: Yes, we are.

Jim: Then we're awake... but we're very puzzled.

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So far, I have never seen a film that I could call a truly great work of art.

But I share Ayn Rand's evaluation of Fritz Lang's work, especially in Siegfried and Metropolis (of the Lang films I've seen so far). I would add Alfred Hitchcock's name to the list of greatest directors (and he is my favorite director). I would probably like D.W. Griffith's work almost as much, when I can see more of it.

I've never see a movie I could call really great, but I do have many favorites that I really love, such as:

1--Chocolat (my favorite film of all time)

2--The Stranger (with Edward G. Robinson, Orson Welles and Loretta Young)

3--The Shawshank Redemption

4--The Fountainhead

5--Fahrenheit 451 (from 1966, with Oskar Werner and Julie Christie)

6--Spartacus (1960 version, with Kirk Douglas and Jean Simmons)

7--Finding Neverland

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1. The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou

2. Star Wars V

3. Star Wars IV

4. Blade Runner

5. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

6. Once Upon a Time in the West (Sergio Leone's masterpiece)

7. Casablanca

8. Touch of Evil

9. North by Northwest

10. Dazed and Confused

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A few of my faves: (Mostly echoes of movies already mentioned):

- Drama: Life is Beautiful

- Romantic Comedy: The Princess Bride

- Comedy - Austin Powers

- Fantasy: Lord of the Rings

- Sci-Fi: Serenity

- Musical - Man of La Mancha

- Thriller: Silence of the Lambs

- Horror: 28 Days Later

- Documentary: Band of Brothers

- Animated: Shrek

- Honorable Mention: Shawshank Redemption, Swing Kids, Incredibles, Braveheart, Rebecca, When Harry Met Sally, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner

There are so many!

--Dan Edge

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Some of my favorites:

Revolution, Blade Runner, Lawrence of Arabia, Cassablanca, Serenity, Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Kelly's Heroes, Das Boot, The Beast, Legends of the Fall, The Usual Suspects, The Odd Angry Shot, The Light Horsemen, Something About Mary, Monty Python and the Quest for the Holy Grail.

And lots more.

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The question I would now ask is: Why? Why do you like a certain movie, especially if it does not fall under the categorie of Romanticism in any way?

I'm curious about why any of you like, for instance, Dr. Strangelove (a very malevolent masterpiece, and certainly not Romanticism), Blade Runner (a film that's plotted as if the writers were very drunk, even though the look and atmosphere of the movie were unique for their time), Touch of Evil (extreme film noir--almost all style, and practically no exposition of character enough to let us really sympathize with them), or Blazing Saddles (a really funny spoof or parody, but that's what it is--a spoof; it is not art, because the story, though meant to be funny, is not played straight as any good comedy should; reality is violated on purpose near the end when the characters go beyond the movie set and into the backlot)?

I'm not condemning anyone for liking these movies--I like a few of them, too. But I'm curious about and interested as to why we, as Objectivists, enjoy movies--or novels, music or painting--that do not come under the categorie of Romanticism as defined by Ayn Rand in The Romantic Manifesto.

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I'm not condemning anyone for liking these movies--I like a few of them, too. But I'm curious about and interested as to why we, as Objectivists, enjoy movies--or novels, music or painting--that do not come under the categorie of Romanticism as defined by Ayn Rand in The Romantic Manifesto.

Ayn Rand may have defined my philosophy but neither she nor anyone else will ever define what I enjoy.

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The question I would now ask is: Why? ...Blazing Saddles (a really funny spoof or parody, but that's what it is--a spoof; it is not art, because the story, though meant to be funny, is not played straight as any good comedy should; reality is violated on purpose near the end when the characters go beyond the movie set and into the back lot)?

I like Blazing Saddles because it shows racism for what it really is, so stupid about all you can do is laugh at it, and it makes me laugh out loud throughout the duration of the film, which so few movies, TV shows or comedians are capable of anymore.

With regards to the end of the movie and reality being violated, I find that very odd because it seems to me that is reality. The reality of the film is just that...it's a film being filmed in Hollywood. (Besides, how else could you have worked the gay Hollywood musical into the fight scene?) :lol:

I have not yet read Romantic Manifesto, although it's next on my reading list, but if something in it tries to convince me that Blazing Saddles is not funny and entertaining, it may become the first thing I've read of Rand's, thus far, that I disagree with.

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