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Craig24

Talented Swedish school cook told to stop making good food

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Lunch lady slammed for food that is 'too good'

A talented head cook at a school in central Sweden has been told to stop baking fresh bread and to cut back on her wide-ranging veggie buffets because it was unfair that students at other schools didn't have access to the unusually tasty offerings.

Yeah, that's right. If everyone can't eat her tasty cuisine, no one can.

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I can't find any other articles on the Swedish school. There is one original article, and the rest of the links are from blogs that are inclined to be biased. I don't even know if it's a good newspaper. Maybe it's Sweden's equivalent of the New York Post. So, I am skeptical that the motivation is that the chef was too good. Failing to follow dietary recommendations is more likely the motivation.

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I went to a catholic school that advertised itself as a "college prep" school.

All of the resources that should have been going into making us disciplined and learned were spent on really strange things like volunteer work and anti-sex speakers.

Worst of all was the fact that the whole entire school cheated on just about everything. Usually when someone says "Everyone cheated" they mean, "My friends and I cheated". However I am not exagerating when one kid would do an assigment, and email it to his or her entire class, and we would buy him or her lunch or something. It was always like this. The teachers new. We practically told them but they didn't care. I would write down the answers to a math assignment as he went over it for us, and would then turn it in for an A even though I never did the assignment. I had a computer class where a professor wouldn't show up for class because he was coaching tennis, so we would convince someone to do the assigment and email to the rest of us. I had a spanish class where so many people failed a test, that she broke down crying in front of the class and didn't count it towards our final grade.

Basically they let a group of 14-19 year olds run the school on the condition that we listen to them talk about jesus.

I eventually went to public school for my senior year.The same variety of things happened. I avoided class like the plague and still graduated (and am still in college, I don't know how). instead of jesus it was our decent football team, army recruiters, drug talks, anti-bullying talks, and some race stuff.

Although the exceptionally bright kids were taken care of by the groups of educators that cared, the rest of us were just kind of there and they didn't care what we did as long as we followed a few rules. The thing is, I don't think the exceptionally bright kids needed these schools or teachers. The really smart kids that were my friends knew all the answers before class, before the lessons were given. It seems like all schools wanted to do was instill a culture, not develope a set of virtues or a skill set.

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I can't find any other articles on the Swedish school. There is one original article, and the rest of the links are from blogs that are inclined to be biased. I don't even know if it's a good newspaper. Maybe it's Sweden's equivalent of the New York Post. So, I am skeptical that the motivation is that the chef was too good. Failing to follow dietary recommendations is more likely the motivation.

The original source seems to a local Swedish newspaper. I don't think it's got a bad reputation, or a reputation of any sort actually... What's surprising though is that I can't find the article in any other papers. Normally they would be all over something like that, wether it's true or not. While I would not be suprised if the story is true, it's smells fishy when noone else has written about it.

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Craig24: where did you get the Rand quote in your signature? I've never seen it, and it doesn't look stylistically like something she'd say.

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Craig24: where did you get the Rand quote in your signature? I've never seen it, and it doesn't look stylistically like something she'd say.

A great question. I found it at Brainy Quotes some time ago and, like you, didn't recognize it. It's actually a line she gave to Comrade Taganov when speaking to Kira. This is the long version:

"I've never had many questions to face in life. People create their own questions, because they are afraid to look straight. All you have to do is look straight and see the road, and when you see it, don't sit looking at it - walk. ... Things are really very simple."

"You remember, you said once that we had the same root somewhere in both of us, because we both believed in life? It's a rare capacity and it can't be taught. And it can't be explained to those in whom that word - life - doesn't awaken the kind of feeling that a temple does, or a military march, or the statue of a perfect body."

More "We The Living" lines here

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I went to a catholic school that advertised itself as a "college prep" school.

All of the resources that should have been going into making us disciplined and learned were spent on really strange things like volunteer work and anti-sex speakers.

Worst of all was the fact that the whole entire school cheated on just about everything. Usually when someone says "Everyone cheated" they mean, "My friends and I cheated". However I am not exagerating when one kid would do an assigment, and email it to his or her entire class, and we would buy him or her lunch or something. It was always like this. The teachers new. We practically told them but they didn't care. I would write down the answers to a math assignment as he went over it for us, and would then turn it in for an A even though I never did the assignment. I had a computer class where a professor wouldn't show up for class because he was coaching tennis, so we would convince someone to do the assigment and email to the rest of us. I had a spanish class where so many people failed a test, that she broke down crying in front of the class and didn't count it towards our final grade.

Basically they let a group of 14-19 year olds run the school on the condition that we listen to them talk about jesus.

I eventually went to public school for my senior year.The same variety of things happened. I avoided class like the plague and still graduated (and am still in college, I don't know how). instead of jesus it was our decent football team, army recruiters, drug talks, anti-bullying talks, and some race stuff.

Although the exceptionally bright kids were taken care of by the groups of educators that cared, the rest of us were just kind of there and they didn't care what we did as long as we followed a few rules. The thing is, I don't think the exceptionally bright kids needed these schools or teachers. The really smart kids that were my friends knew all the answers before class, before the lessons were given. It seems like all schools wanted to do was instill a culture, not develope a set of virtues or a skill set.

Hello. I was subject to mild environmentalism like making recycled paper, planting a few trees, and maintaining a rather cool greenhouse and meteorology mini station in elementary private non religious school, but it never took more than one half day a school a week and we still learned a few skills and even science (this was when we were worried about the Ozone Hole (and our Southern Hemisphere skin) being repaired by avoiding using spray deodorants to write in fire for the kicks- way before Cimate Change turned into organized religion).

I was then subjected to rather intense old school Maoist (not exaggerating) in a retrograde but finest public high school; but even there we still had to learn a lot of actual details, and unused but interesting languages (reading anti imperialist texts in French for instance) and math was very demanding and ideology free.

Further this was compensated by an education in Classical History that accompanied Latin class in which we had to learn the ways of the Roman reading texts in vulgar but correct Latin about the patriarchate, the esteemed Greek slave and teacher of the house, and the Empire, not in a necessarily bad light.

If your story is not an exaggeration then I'd love to know more about it as it illustrates so perfectly the theory that formal education is rotten and introduce you to the ideas of Celia Green on education and the exceptional kid.

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Are you chinese?

No my stories were not exaggerations.

The thing about American schools is the education you got is essentially available to everyone. If you as a student want to, you can learn anything you want. Unlike schools from other countries, where they sort kids into different types of high schools, people of all sorts of academic merit can end up at the same school. Catholic schools follow the same egalitarian path so they take kids as long as they conform to a set of values. Meaning that you have facilities that are built for one type of student being used on a whole bunch of types of students.

I think i might have been better getting my GED at 14 and working for a few years, and maybe going to college when I had a better work ethic. However that kind of path is looked down upon in our society (I don't know why).

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Although the exceptionally bright kids were taken care of by the groups of educators that cared, the rest of us were just kind of there and they didn't care what we did as long as we followed a few rules. The thing is, I don't think the exceptionally bright kids needed these schools or teachers. The really smart kids that were my friends knew all the answers before class, before the lessons were given. It seems like all schools wanted to do was instill a culture, not develope a set of virtues or a skill set.

I may be wrong, but I believe Volco is from Brazil. Interestingly enough, you're more likely to find Maoists in South America than in China thanks to Che. China isn't even Maoist anymore.

Exceptionally bright kids need schools and teachers just as much as anyone else - they're kids, after all, however intelligent they may be. What you described wasn't much egalitarianism as much as a horrible education system. Race and anti-bullying talks likely involved egalitarian notions, but what you described is a failure of administrators to care enough to actually do anything to implement those beliefs. Unfortunately, some may come in and say "See? We need more equality! The bad students need better teachers, while our smart students get more education than they need!"

Your story still interests me, too. What did school administrators do to combat cheating? Did they even care?

Edited by Eiuol

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