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I saw my first $2 bill today

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Now I don't mean the idea of having a bill for $2, but the way the $2 bill was designed. On the back of a $1 bill there is that weird pyramid thing and the eagle seal. On the back of a $5 bill there is the Lincoln Monument. On the back of a $10 bill there is the U.S. Treasury. On the back of a $20 bill is The White House. On the back of a $50 bill is the U.S. Capitol. On the back of a $100 is Independence Hall. But on the back of a $2 bill is something much better, a rendition of the Declaration of Independence! It may just be me but I find the document stating that each man has a right to life, liberty and the pursuit of his own happiness and that it is only to insure these rights that governments exist much more uplifting than any building. Not to mention it has Thomas Jefferson on the front, instead of some of the less important figures other bills sport, such as Benjamin Franklin on the $100 bill. The front and back of this bill can be seen here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._two_dollar_bill . What do you guys think about it?

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It may just be me but I find the document stating that each man has a right to life, liberty and the pursuit of his own happiness and that it is only to insure these rights that governments exist much more uplifting than any building.  Not to mention it has Thomas Jefferson on the front, instead of some of the less important figures other bills sport, such as Benjamin Franklin on the $100 bill.  The front and back of this bill can be seen here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._two_dollar_bill .  What do you guys think about it?

It is not just you. The Declaration of Independence does contain exactly those words. Why do you think Ayn Rand loved the Founding Fathers and America?

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Now I don't mean the idea of having a bill for $2, but the way the $2 bill was designed.  On the back of a $1 bill there is that weird pyramid thing and the eagle seal.  On the back of a $5 bill there is the Lincoln Monument.  On the back of a $10 bill there is the U.S. Treasury.  On the back of a $20 bill is The White House.  On the back of a $50 bill is the U.S. Capitol.  On the back of a $100 is Independence Hall.  But on the back of a $2 bill is something much better, a rendition of the Declaration of Independence!  It may just be me but I find the document stating that each man has a right to life, liberty and the pursuit of his own happiness and that it is only to insure these rights that governments exist much more uplifting than any building.  Not to mention it has Thomas Jefferson on the front, instead of some of the less important figures other bills sport, such as Benjamin Franklin on the $100 bill.  The front and back of this bill can be seen here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._two_dollar_bill .  What do you guys think about it?

I would agree mostly with you, except your characterizing Benjamin Franklin as a "less important figure". I think you ought to review your knowledge of the period 1763 - 1789 of US History as well as to get yourself a decent biography of Benjamin Franklin. There's no way a man who was a great stateman, prolific inventor, brilliant scientist, succesful businessman, and--to top it off--one the most significant Founding Fathers of America, be any "less important"!

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The only less important people on the currency are U.S. Grant and maybe Hamilton and Lincoln, because there are more important founders who didn't make it on any currency like John Adams and James Madison. Of course FDR, JFK, Eisenhower, Susan B. Anthony, and Sacagawea being on any American currency is an abomination.

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I was under the impression that the Presidents who were considered more imprtant were put on the lower-denomination bills.

Two of the people on the currency were never president (Hamilton and Franklin). The ten dollar bill is lower than the twenty and historically Jackson was more important than Hamilton, plus Jackson was a president.

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