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The Regulation of Hackers

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Is there an important philosphical difference between Islamic or NK hackers exercising a veto over movie production and the regulations and taxes from elected governments?

 

One obvious difference is that there is known formal process for obtaining permission from governments whereas the actions of ISIS and NK are something that you just have to hope you don't provoke. On the other hand, given the uneven and politizied application of law, it's not always obvious when you are subject to regulation and when not.

 

Is it rational for movie studios to seek ISIS or NK permission to produce movies that might offend them as they might apply for a license from the government?

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Is there an important philosphical difference between Islamic or NK hackers exercising a veto over movie production and the regulations and taxes from elected governments?

Since both are wrongs and infringements on rights, that's the conceptual similarity. However, one evil does not justify another.

If the U.S. government thinks NK did this Sony attack, as the FBI and Obama said today, then the US government should respond.

The key military question here is: just because a country has a few nukes and a reckless dictator, does it mean one cannot react in any way to any of its provocations?

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Why should the US government respond? Why not Japan or the UN?

 

More importantly, how ought Sony respond?

This was an American movie in most senses. Japan could respond too, since this is SONY.

The UN is a joke.

SONY cannot respond militarily. I think they should have released the movie though, even if it were a severely limited release and mostly unattended. 

Of course SONY, along with every other company, ought to get more serious about cyber attacks... which means understanding the nature of their vulnerabilities and acting to fix them.

Edited by softwareNerd
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SONY cannot respond militarily. I think they should have released the movie though, even if it were a severely limited release and mostly unattended. 

Of course SONY, along with every other company, ought to get more serious about cyber attacks... which means understanding the nature of their vulnerabilities and acting to fix them.

 

Sony could pay hackers to counterattack or something like that.

 

But it's not clear to me that Sony should ignore the threat anymore than it might ignore taxation or regulation. If Japan had censored the movie formally would you argue that they should release it anyway?

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Sony could pay hackers to counterattack or something like that.

 

But it's not clear to me that Sony should ignore the threat anymore than it might ignore taxation or regulation. If Japan had censored the movie formally would you argue that they should release it anyway?

Well, the hack itself is water under the bridge. If North Korea can do more damage and the governments of the U.S., Japan etc. will not do anything about it, then Sony would have to re-evaluate whether they need to cave in, or become their own little "government" by retaliation. In theory, Sony could try to form a mercenary army and attack North Korea :)
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