Jump to content
Objectivism Online Forum

Japanese Anime

Rate this topic


Recommended Posts

The Ghost in the Shell series is one of the most deeply philosophic movies I have ever seen. I have been fascinated with it since I first saw it many years ago, and have seen every one of the series and sequel. I would love to do an intense study of the movie to iron out its philosophy better.

It's a great example of lengthy philosophic dialogue incorporated into an engrossing movie without becoming boring.

Something we should consider if ever A.S. out T.F. Our even Anthem are taken to film.

Has anyone here studied it? Any opinions?

I'd do the same to the Vampire Hunter D series and Blood: the last vampire (wheres my sequel!!) and Battle

Angel Alita -(will be movie soon!).

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 53
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Appleseed in particular disgusted me, philosophically. When it showed a communist utopia where everyone's desires are taken care of, and the only thing that was still wrong was the prejudice against the "bioroids."

Read the manga. That "communist utopia" was described as "A zoo for those wierd animals that build their own cages and hide inside of them." I always liked that line. The only way the "utopia" could work is if humans were "stabalized", ie. no longer human. And Ghia, the computer setup to protect Man from the bioroids, knew that was wrong and tried to destroy the bioroids. There is no bioroid virus or whatever it was, in the manga story. The manga is far superior to the movie.

Ghost in the Shell is a great series. Written by the same author as Appleseed. I don't care for the GitS movies much, either. But the manga and the series are amazing.

Also interesting are the works of Mohiro Kiho. Narutaro (aka Shadow Star) is an interesting look at psycology. What would children do with limitless power? The anime series only covers the first half of the manga story so I don't know how it ends yet (manga translations have been extremely slow). The anime was really good but Kito doesn't pull any punches with graphic violence. It contains some of the most horrific scenes I've ever seen. And that was after it was toned down for TV.

Whether I can agree with a story's philosophy or not, I like when they at least give you something to think about.

Edited by TronDD
Link to post
Share on other sites
On the otherhand, there are a lot of stereotypes that I don't like. I'm not a real big fan of giant mecha anime because it militarily doesn't make sense to me. I also don't like that male figures are typically effeminate and full of angst (which in my eyes turns the protagonist from hero to whiny teenager.)

No one has mentioned it yet but I highly recommend one to everyone. The anime that had me hooked for life was the first OAV I ever saw: Gunbuster It was made by Gainax and is, in some ways, the granddaddy of shows like FLCL (Not just because they're both made by Gainax, but because they represent a "blowing off of animation steam" by the creators). Gainax originally wanted to make a series that made fun of all the stereotypes being pumped out, but eventually the project took on a bigger scope. The result is a six movie set that begins somewhat light-heartedly and ends with an astoundingly emotional finale. If you like comedy, sci-fi, great animation, a heart-wrenching plot, lots of techy details... you must see this OAV.

To respond directly to The Tortured One, the mecha in this movie actually does make military sense. The plot premise is that Earth is under attack by aliens that are much *much* larger than most human built ships, and thus, something very large is needed.

Two special side notes about Gunbuster. It hosts the *largest* mecha ever featured in any anime. It is also the originator of the "Gainax bounce". (You know, that thing girls do all the time? ;p)

If you're tired of the Shinji types [coward] (Evangelion) and the Yuki [unemotional] types (Fruits Basket), or even the Kamui types [angsty] ("X" by Clamp), I'd suggest going back to the 70's. Series that have become watered down because of lame stereotypes sometimes have earlier incarnations with strong characters. A noteable example of this is the Gundam series. I was first introduced to Gundam Wing, which is too close to watching a boy band with mechas. At some point later, Toonami showed Mobile Suit Gundam 0080. Much to my surprise, the main characters are all over the age of 20 and seem to have their head together. It was entirely refreshing.

Purple titles are those not previously listed in this thread.

More modern series that I have enjoyed include:

Vandread (Space battle of the sexes with bonus aliens)

Full Metal Panic! (Secret organization becomes bodyguard for school girl)

Read or Die (The movie/OAV, not the series - Bookworm saves the world)

Favorite quote from the fansub version (it came out differently in the dub) "I think true love (i.e. real life) is much more wonderful (than the stories in books). Although there may be painful things, no matter what kind of love it is, you can be the heroine." Readman Yomiko

GITS:SAC (Already mentioned, but was very engrossing after the first two or so episodes. Animation is somewhat lacking.)

Earlier series of note:

InuYasha (Gotta love the tension between Kagome and InuYasha! Still, I'm more curious to see what will happen between Sashomarou and Rin)

Kodomo no Omocha (Extremely hyper animation, very happy people)

Golden Boy (Not for kids but totally hilarious! - College dropout finds random work)

Ranma 1/2 (Very old and only good subtitled, but sweet story like InuYasha)

Movies I enjoyed:

Princess Mononoke (The soundtrack is fantastic too!)

Spirited Away

New Dominion Tank Police (not the series - movie is hilarious, wonderfully animated)

Vampire Hunter D (Both old and new versions and the (finally) translated novels)

Escaflowne (Although the story is ridiculously condensed to the point of a few things not making sense to the uninitiated, I really liked the animation and music.)

End of Evangelion (The series left me hating Shinji but the "end" movie was fascinating to watch. As one observer put it, when told of a possible live-action version for this movie, it would be incredibly difficult to show the true-to-story pathos of so many deaths [i'll leave further details out for spoilers reasons])

Link to post
Share on other sites

Read the manga. That "communist utopia" was described as "A zoo for those wierd animals that build their own cages and hide inside of them." I always liked that line. The only way the "utopia" could work is if humans were "stabalized", ie. no longer human. And Ghia, the computer setup to protect Man from the bioroids, knew that was wrong and tried to destroy the bioroids. There is no bioroid virus or whatever it was, in the manga story. The manga is far superior to the movie.

For some reason, I hear and understand the "read the manga" line alot. Ghost in the Shell, DragonBall Z, Akira, and apparently Appleseed were far superior in Manga form than anime form.

To respond directly to The Tortured One, the mecha in this movie actually does make military sense. The plot premise is that Earth is under attack by aliens that are much *much* larger than most human built ships, and thus, something very large is needed.

I like it when anime has reasons like these. It annoys me in show like Gasaraki, when it shows big mechas fighting each other and I can't help but wonder "why not just take it out with a HEAT round? or a MOAB if aiming is an issue?" Of course, I realize that these are only plot devices, thus it's not like I loose sleep if it is an issue. It made for some badass special effects and fight scenes in Appleseed.

Of course, Gasaraki bugged me with it's "America is old and weak, Japan is new and Strong" approach to military might. Apparently someone ain't been reading on Japanese economics.

oh, and for the record, I found FL_CL to be fantastically funny.

I don't know if this has been mentioned, but I liked Metropolis. I like Ozamu, as his works (Astro Boy, Kimba the white Lion, and Metropolis) all have great themes to them.

While I am ranting, has anyone ever noticed that anime women usually fall into two distinct personality archetypes? They are either fiery, wild, freespirited, and headstrong, or they are quiet, reserved, polite, and headstrong. Maybe that is a cultural thing that should be overlooked, but I wonder if there are any heroines out there who have more depth than this.

Like I said, I treat anime as neither always good, nor always bad, it is a genre of cinema, with both great aspects, and poor ones.

Edited by the tortured one
Link to post
Share on other sites
While I am ranting, has anyone ever noticed that anime women usually fall into two distinct personality archetypes? They are either fiery, wild, freespirited, and headstrong, or they are quiet, reserved, polite, and headstrong. Maybe that is a cultural thing that should be overlooked, but I wonder if there are any heroines out there who have more depth than this.

One of my favorite female characters is Kaname Chidori from Full Metal Panic. I was delighted to see a strong willed female lead that's still quite realistically human. How she approaches situations is a very nice blend between heroine and attractive lead. There are other female characters (and male) around her that fit more snugly into the traditional stereotypes. (The little synopsis on the website posted is a tad too short to reveal her wonderful character development across 24 episodes.)

If you want to go completely off the handle for interesting females, check out Golden Boy. I guarantee they'll leave a distinct impression :thumbsup: Very "well-rounded".

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think anyone has mentioned Great Teacher Onizuka. A funny and heartwarming series. Onizuka is a rebelious type of guy who wants to be come a teacher, originally, to be around 16 year old girls. He ends up teaching the "problem" class in a junior high and is able to win them over because he refuses to give up on them and consider them garbage like the other faculty have.

A few of my favorite shows are:

Gunslinger Girls - An interesting illustration of emotion and ethics. Young girls who, for one reason or another, are abandoned or near death, are "saved" by a secret government group that rebuilds their bodies with artificial parts, "conditions" their minds so they will work willingly and then use them as assassins. You see what it is these girls go through and how they say they feel about it and it makes you wonder if they were better off dying or not.

Elfen Lied - This show has a lot of nudity and gory violence. People with extreme physical power vs. normal people. Who are the monsters? That's what I got out of that series, anyway.

Now and Then, Here and There - A young boy, Shu, get's pulled into another world where a crazy dictator is trying to conquer the world. Horrible things happen to people. :thumbsup: There is also a being, Lalaru, who can conjure water from her pendant. Water is needed, not only for the people, but to power the war machine. They try to force Lalaru to give them water. The series is a good illustration of corrupt power, exploitation of those who are productive, and that, despite the bad events in history, people are generally good.

"Because ten billion

years time is so fragile,

so ephemeral...

it arouses such a

bittersweet,

almost heartbreaking fondness."

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I have read graphic novels and watched anime. And my impression is that graphic novels (which are closer to the author's original intention) are superior. Why do animators mess up the stories? They change the sequence of events; add and subtract events; etc.. I have noticed this in both "InuYasha" and "Full Metal Alchemist".

Link to post
Share on other sites

It could be due to a third party arbitrarily changing the storyline to something more preferable for them. However, I think it is mostly due to the technical aspect of translating mediums.

Also, there are more commercial aspects to think about when you are entering a medium that costs more to produce. If producers and editors think that something is wrong with a story, they are more inclined to change it if more money is at stake.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

I find the American (and western) obssession of anime somewhat pathetic. There are certainly high quality films that could be classified as anime. For example, most of Miyazaki's work. However, most anime is of little substance. Even more disconcerting is the idea of anime being the center of Japanese culture. Such an attitude is similar to a foriegner thinking star trek is all America is about. An "otaku" attitude will not get you very far with the Japanese.

In my opinion, the capitalistic stregnths, value of education, and achievement in the arts are a much more representative of Japanese culture.

Link to post
Share on other sites
The Ghost in the Shell series is one of the most deeply philosophic movies I have ever seen. I have been fascinated with it since I first saw it many years ago, and have seen every one of the series and sequel. I would love to do an intense study of the movie to iron out its philosophy better.

It's a great example of lengthy philosophic dialogue incorporated into an engrossing movie without becoming boring.

Something we should consider if ever A.S. out T.F. Our even Anthem are taken to film.

Has anyone here studied it? Any opinions?

I'd do the same to the Vampire Hunter D series and Blood: the last vampire (wheres my sequel!!) and Battle

Angel Alita -(will be movie soon!).

I've never watched all of the Ghost in the Shell series, but it's definitely an awesome movie.

I especially liked it's sequel. The way the robots moved was fascinating.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

[Watch as I prove necromancy to be true!]

I'm glad I found this thread. My anime addiction just came about this year. Last year, my freshman year in college, I began watching anime alot on Adult Swim and I always had a problem because I would miss alot of episode or come into series late. I didn't have the money to buy them either. But this school year, a new friend of mine was really into anime and said he only watches the japanese version.

He gets his anime from www.national-anime.com and downloads it. You can get all the anime you ever wanted, almost every anime ever made!

He reopened his account and gave me his password so I could begin downloading and sharing the account with him (we worked out alot of deals for "repayment" ie-- I bought him alot of meals!). But he got me into alot of anime. The one I originally asked him to download for me was Eureka Seven.

Eureka Seven does have the whole "love-hate" thing but it's also sort of an anti-facist series as well. I noticed from the start that the japanese version was a hell of alot better then the American version. You get attached to the characters and their struggle to save their planet and stop their facist government.

Anyways, the series i'm watching right now are my two favorite animes and shows ive ever seen and I recommend them to anyone.

The first, and my favorite is Bleach! It's on Adult Swim right now, but the English dubbing is not that great. It's epic and serious and has alot of comical moments. Why it's my favorite is because it develops it's characters really well, it's plot and storylines and executed incredibly and i'm almost convinced that the main character is base off Howard Roark. Ichigo Kurowsaki is the main character and he looks like Roark and even acts like him. He's serious, smart and totally selfish.

The basic plot of the serious is that throughout Ichigo entire life he has been able to see ghosts. He's 14 now and in highschool and it's never been a problem until one day, walking downtown he sees this little girls ghost being chased down by a huge monster. Then a young girl dressed like a samurai comes and slays the monster. Ichigo is the only one who even notices this. That night he sees the samurai girl again briefly and figures out that she either can't see him or is ignoring him. Then in the middle of the night, he wakes to the sound of his younger sister screaming, he goes to find out that both of his sisters (he has two young sisters and a father, his mother is died) are being attack by a monster like the one he saw earlier. Then the samurai girl shows up and fights the monster, but gets defeated. The monster can speak and tells Ichigo that he is going to kill and eat him and his entire family. At this point Ichigo is desperate for a way to save himself and his family. So he goes and tries to take the sword from the Samurai who explains that her name is Rukia and she is a Shinigami, a Death God. She tells him to save himself and he says I can save myself and the people he loves if he had her weapon and he powers. So she gives him his powers and then he becomes a Death God and slays the monster. The next morning his family doesn't recall what happened to them the night before and even discovers Rukia is in his classrom as a "transfer student" she explains that she is wearing a false body because, obviously, shes a spirit and because of the new body people can see her so she has to have "a real life" so to speak and she wants to stick to Ichigo because he has her powers and now he has to fight the Hollows (the big monsters) for her.

The reason I say he is like Roark is because when Rukia asks him to take her place, she says he has to be prepared to be "totally selfless" and put everyone else befor himself. He says he can never do that and that he wont. Later, Ichigo saves someone from a Hollow and Rukia tells him that he is finally prepared to give up his live for others. Ichigo says it's nothing "like that" and that he doesn't live for others, but he doesn't want to live in a world where people are killed because of monsters he has the power to stop. He says it has nothing to do with "selflessness."

That's why Bleach is my favorite, it's the closet thing to Objectivism i've seen in a show.

My second favorite is Death Note. This show is so incredibly intelligient that it will blow you away. The entire show, every episode, is pure 100% genius.

The premise of the show is about a boy named Light, he's smart, real genius, top of class, women want him men want to be him etc etc. It starts in the year 2006(the anime does, the manga starts in 2004) and Light is studying to become a detective one day because he sees the world around him "decaying and dying." Everday on Japanese T.V. and in the papers it's nothing but criminals and the crimes they commit, hundreds of people get beaten, mugged, raped or killed, and yet the world does not do enough to stop it.

One day as Light is in class he looks out the window and sees a notebook falling from the sky. After class he goes to check it and sees the front of the notebook read "Death Note" in english. Light thinks it's a joke and opens up the notebook to read, "How to Use" with a list of rules:

"The human whose name is written in this note shall die.

This note will not take effect unless the writer has the person's face in their mind when writing his/her name. Therefore, people sharing the same name will not be affected.

If the cause of death is written within 40 seconds of writing the person's name, it will happen. If the cause of death is not specified, the subject will simply die of a heart attack.

After writing the cause of death, the details of the death should be written in the next 6 minutes and 40 seconds."

Light brings the note home with him and tests it out as a joke, wondering if it's true. The name he writes in the Death Note is a man who, at the moment is holding up a group of school kids in a school. It's all over the news, and on every channel, they show the mans picture and say his name and Light writes in down. A minute later the kids come running out of the school saying the man suddenly died...

Light realizes the Death Note is real and he has the power to kill anyone, as long as he knows their face and name. Light sets out to judge all the people in the world and to cleanse the earth of criminals and scum -- thus becoming the new God of this world. However, he runs into problems.

At the very beginning of the anime, the first scene takes place in "Death God's world" with a Death God named Ryuk. Ryuk is bored with Death God world and tells the King of the Death God's he lost his Death Note... so he gets a new one, but really, he never lost his, and now he has two. He goes and drops the second one into the Human world, then Light finds it.

After several days of killing criminals Ryuk appears before Light, who is shocked but he expected something like this to happen. He think's Ryuk is coming to stop him, but Ryuk explains that he is merely there to watch and that this is all just fun and games for him.

So Light proceeds... but not without opposition. The killing of thousands of criminals has not gone unnoticed. Every police and military system in the world has noticed it and is trying to find an answer to the strange killings. All they know is that someone by the name of "Kira" is actually behind it. This attracts the attention of the worlds best detective, a man known only as "L." The FBI and CIA have worked with him, so has Japanese police and every other agency...

This begins the struggle between Light and L, who both see what they are doing as being "justice" and the right thing to do. L says that no one should have the power Kira has, and judgement is in the hands of the law and law enforcement...

It's an interesting show that will seriously "mind-fuck" you. It will tingle your reasoning abilities for sure.

That's all for now, this post is already getting long.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...
That's why Bleach is my favorite, it's the closet thing to Objectivism i've seen in a show.

Ye, Bleach is the best thing I've ever seen on a television. It grabbed me like nothing else, the main character, the comedy, the music.

I loved it before I knew Miss Rand's view of art, and for the same reasons as when I did learn it. Check out the end credit sequences they change them every couple of months, there's just a "feeling" they give off that I can't put my finger on.

Ichigo: uncompromising, independent, determined and has orange hair hmmm......

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

Currently there are no series that really capture my curiosity. I tend to go for full-fledged features, and of those a very select number:

I enjoy the movies made by Satoshi Kon, in particular:

Paprika: This was a very interesting movie. Very unique in its approach, with an underlying theme of Science and opposition to science (the villain opposes the use of science to explore the human subconscious). It does have a mystical element in that it posits that the sub-conscious is interlinked (dreams are connected together), and so goes for a Jungian tangent- but this is mostly a plot element to give the villain a foothold, as he wants to become the lord of the realm. It acts as a metaphor for knowledge, and the ultimate fate of those who think they can stop others from acquiring knowledge. Despite the epic scope, it's rather cheerful and good-humored.

Perfect Blue: An interesting psychological thriller that explores the difference between the public persona of a celebrity and their actual identity.

Tokyo Godfathers: I liked this movie because although the characters are essentially vagabonds, there is something tremendously noble within each one of them. They begin the story at their most hopeless and despairing, but the circumstance of the baby brings out the best of each individual (with a couple of stumbles along the way). And when things get really rough, they perform quite a few heroic feats.

Millennium Actress: An ode to the actresses of the past, I would call it (and inspired by a specific Japanese actress of the golden age of cinema). The movie plays with the element of memory very well, integrating scenes that the actress has played in her movies with scenes of her real life-- there is a slight blurred edge between which is which at times, but that serves as a metaphor for what every good actor knows: Every scene performed well must have a background of experience from your own life. Even when the situations aren't exactly the same, there must be a core of memory, or of feeling, that has to be evoked in order to make the fiction believable. The ending is one of the few in an animated feature that has gotten me misty-eyed. Kiyoko, the actress in the film, acknowledges that what she has loved most about her life was the pursuit of a specific goal (always the same one), no matter how unattainable it may have seemed.

I'm also a HUGE fan of Hayao Miyazaki because of the element of wonder he invokes with his fable-like stories. The only story I didn't really like was Princess Mononoke, for its environmentalist bend, but was enchanted with Spirited Away, Kiki's Delivery Service, My neighbor Totoro and many of his other movies.

Outside of that? Maybe Excel Saga because of the absurdist and irreverent humor (a lot of it poking fun at Anime series tropes). At one point I started watching Fruits Basket, but I couldn't really finish it because the Ultra-Submissive Girl Stereotype that rears its head in a lot of Anime drives me up the bloody wall! -- Tohru has no self-esteem, no initiative, is completely subservient and is glad to play the rug and get stepped on and quietly cry to herself afterwards. Most of the time I wanted to grab her and shake her until something clicked inside her skull. Actually, The Tohru Trope is a reason why I don't watch a LOT of Anime.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually like anything with a more or less Steampunk bent (For instance, worlds where the main technology is Steam, as opposed to electricity and such). One example is Castle in the Sky, a Hayao Miyazaki masterpiece about two kids who search for the legendary flying-city of Laputa (Or at least I think... it's been a while since I've seen it). The shear amount of wonder and creativity present in a simple two-hour feature is simply incredible, and that doesn't even address the lovable characters and the absolutely beautiful animation (Something apparent in all Miyazaki films).

I don't watch too many series-specific Anime, but among them I must say that I enjoyed the shows Last Exile, though it's ending wasn't very memorable; Full Metal Alchemist, which is a fun show with admirable characters that even gets a bit philosophical every once in a while; and I've recently watched Rahxephon, which is one of those "giant mecha" shows with many Surrealist Art themes.

Also, while I'm here, I'd like to ask a question regarding the previously discussed Bleach. Since it apparently has a few fans here, I'd like to know if anyone could give their opinion as to whether the Manga is any better (Or as good) as the Anime version? I ask because time and money limits me from getting into any super-long series right now (I believe Bleach has something like 200 episodes?), and Manga are a lesser commitment.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Also, while I'm here, I'd like to ask a question regarding the previously discussed Bleach. Since it apparently has a few fans here, I'd like to know if anyone could give their opinion as to whether the Manga is any better (Or as good) as the Anime version? I ask because time and money limits me from getting into any super-long series right now (I believe Bleach has something like 200 episodes?), and Manga are a lesser commitment.

Go with the manga if you don't want to invest in the anime. Bleach anime is good when it is on the manga story arcs, but as the anime catches up to the manga they will leave the manga story arc and do 50 episodes of filler that is boring and dreadful to watch.

Other anime series that are great are:

Neon Genesis Evangelion - Deep, surreal, and philosophical

Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagann - Blow your mind

Ergo Proxy - Surreal

D. Gray Man - if you like bleach

Hajime no Ippo - about a kid that decides to become a boxer, and his unrelenting pursuit of his goal, any objectivist would love this series.

I have watched a ton of anime and can give many more suggestions if anyone is interested.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Also, while I'm here, I'd like to ask a question regarding the previously discussed Bleach. Since it apparently has a few fans here, I'd like to know if anyone could give their opinion as to whether the Manga is any better (Or as good) as the Anime version? I ask because time and money limits me from getting into any super-long series right now (I believe Bleach has something like 200 episodes?), and Manga are a lesser commitment.

The Manga is about ten trillion times better then the Anime. There are no fillers, which are distracting and actually misrepresent the characters in my opinion. The art works a lot better because it's in the original black and white which sometimes doesn't translate to the anime very well. It's a lot more enjoyable, and you can easily find the manga online to browse through.

Link to post
Share on other sites
The Manga is about ten trillion times better then the Anime. There are no fillers, which are distracting and actually misrepresent the characters in my opinion. The art works a lot better because it's in the original black and white which sometimes doesn't translate to the anime very well. It's a lot more enjoyable, and you can easily find the manga online to browse through.

Thanks, that's what I was hoping for. I might not have bothered, though -- in my experience, only very, very rarely does an Anime out-do it's original Manga source material (And in some cases, a when a Manga is made after the anime, it's still better...).

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 weeks later...

I have a solid opinion on FLCL.

I once described it as "post-post-modern" because it recycles the cliches of an already very post-modern genre so heavily that it reads, in terms of style anyway, as a post-modern critique of post-modernism. There is almost nothing *new* in FLCL. It depends on the post-modernist aesthetic (nothing new can be done; the old can only merely be recycled and rearranged in new ways; self-reference is the ultimate in aesthetic value) in order to make fun of same. If you find watching things and trying to guess from where the creators stole each element, you may find FLCL interesting.

It does have a few very nice bits, though. I'm particularly fond of Episode 4, which has a spectacular climax sequence. The plot is an ordinary young-boy-coming-of-age-with-giant-robots-and-a-threat-of-total-destruction Japanese anime story, complete with unrequited-inappropriate-age-disparity-romantic-interest and secretive-oppressive-corporate-government. But it is far more clever than, say, Family Guy or anything from Williams Street, and it's beautifully executed. Worth a watch or two, but I wouldn't plunk down $30 for a box set unless I'd seen it first.

~Q

Link to post
Share on other sites
Does anyone have a solid opinion on FLCL ? I gather it's crazy, but it's coming out on a new box set in UK, thought I'd try it.

It's an interesting watch (And probably worth it for the production values alone - the animation is absolutely fantastic). It's definitely crazy, but in an odd sort of way, as if your sure you've nearly grasped the thin thread of logic that the director has hidden in all of the wild colors, but just can't keep a firm hold on. I certainly won't call it art, but if you've got the cash to spend, then by all means, you could do much worse.

Link to post
Share on other sites

anime seams just like any other cartoon. They're just japanese and they seem to have more intense graphics

HOwever, i like naruto sometimes and i believe it's not that bad. However, the comics are just horrible.

the other anime comics are just pointless violence expressed so much in the comic books that I myself am just

bored now. I would not recommend buying a whole stack of bleach comics for a flight from california to texas. It would just suck. You would be bored the whole time and you wouldn't be able to concentrate.. Also, the overall things that happen in the comic book are just

repetitive to the last stand!!

I'd recommend something like batman or something...

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 7 months later...
I've recently been enjoying Code Geass

I know this thread is quite old but I just thought I'd add one thought. I finished watching Code Geass not so long ago and was surprised by how much I liked it. The style didn't initially appeal to me and it's not something I'd have normally watched if a friend hadn't recommended it. There was a lot of good, and some bad, and a lot of stand anime fare. It mirrored "V for Vendetta", both in that it had a strongly politically rebellious plot and unfortunately that it didn't ultimately have much of a positive solution.

One of the late episodes had a great quote from the main character stating his motivation. It went something like, "[The villain] wanted yesterday, you want today, I want tomorrow." It feels as though I've heard a very similar line somewhere before, possibly by Rand but I'm unable to place it at the moment.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

I don't know why I never made a post in here! It is an old thread, though I may as well use it.

Being purposely vague here in order to prevent spoilers, I'd have to agree here that Code Geass is an enjoyable watch. And anyone interested can see it on the Bandai Entertainment channel on youtube. There is a strong positive sense of life expressed by the main character making choices primarily revolving around one's own values. Especially interesting here is conflict that occurs from some clear philosophical error, and its eventual resolution. Plot is strong, goal-oriented action is clear. Animation itself might take some getting used to – the characters look like fashion illustrations to me – but the style is distinct and unique, while clearly being anime.

Kurokami is another great anime also available on the same Bandai channel on youtube. Theme in this one primarily revolves around social relations between people and how those relations can be empowering in a non-altruistic way. That sort of sentiment/thought is quickly evident early on, and taken to a literal level with some interesting plot features. I personally got hooked on the first episode I watched, so if you are appealed by a portrayal of egoistic relations (even portrayal of the damage of altruistic relations!), you should watch. Similar in sense of life expressed is Eureka 7, but its plot I don't find as gripping.

My absolute favorite anime is Death Note, but the complexity in discussing that is not fit for this thread.

To list other great anime:

.hack//SIGN

Trigun

Ergo Proxy

Neon Genesis Evangelion

Full Metal Alchemist (seems great, have not finished it, not even close)

I'm not sure if it's just me, but does anyone else find that anime a lot more expressive of how people should and ought to be more so than American television/movies? My suspicion as to why this is so is that anime are usually about 25 episodes long, 50 for the longest anime. There is necessity in maintaining a plot and having a conclusion. A show like Dexter is basically meant to go on indefinitely until ratings drop enough to cancel the show. Well, some anime are like that, such as Bleach, which I'm not a big fan of anyway.

Edited by Eiuol
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...