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Welcome to the forum!

I read The Fountainhead back in 1986 in my High School English class (it was on the reading list for book reviews) and enjoyed it very much although it was not a life changing experience. I did promise myself that ought to read more by this author. When I read Atlas Shrugged a year later in my freshman year at UCLA, my life changed forever. I have since reread both several times. I found my reaction to rereading The Fountainhead stronger than the initial readings but I still always find Atlas Shrugged to be the more impressive book.

Since Tikkun is Hebrew and means repair, so what are you hoping to fix?

:huh:

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Since Tikkun is Hebrew and means repair, so what are you hoping to fix?

:huh:

I chose the name due to a conversation I had with my father last night. Mainly the fact that Christianity has a nasty strain of world hatred running through it while jewish culture does not. Where a Christian tends to beleive the world is fallen and worthless; jews, in my understanding, tend to try and make the world a better place.

I'm not religious though so I wouldn't read to much into my nick if I were you.

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Tikkun Olam (world fixing) is a very religious term. It means your moral obligation to make the world a better place, to "fix" it.

There is a relevant quote from one of the big Rabbis if I recall correctly, saying: "If you believe that you can break it, you must believe that you can fix it."

It's a worldy and pro-free will view, on the one hand. On the other it does rely on God's will, and moral duty. And the things one is supposed to fix is probably human greed, poverty, stuff like that.

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"Where a Christian tends to beleive the world is fallen and worthless; jews, in my understanding, tend to try and make the world a better place."

Tikkun,

Orthodox Christianity is no different than orthodox Judaism in its view of the world as good, worthy, and meaningful (after all, God made it), though fallen. That there are Manichaen-like strains of heterodox Christianity out there does not affect that---just thought you should know before you go on making generalizations.

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Without dragging this into a "What does Tikkun mean?" type of thread, I heard the term originally from the magazine of the same name, which while having religious content, seems more about spreading peace in the world.

Anyway, nice meeting you two.

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Seeing your nick immediately brought up years of painfully boring Sunday school and Confirmation lectures on the meaning Tikkun Olam and its relation to “social justice” (*gag*)

Anyway, welcome :)

Edited by GreedyCapitalist

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