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Why has religion been so persistent?

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LDS theology is not burdened with the same irrational view of God, e.g., somehow pre-existing existence and who then created what we know as existence, the world.
I'm often surprised to learn details of Mormonism, like the sacred underwear thing, the idea that god was originally a mortal on the planet Kolob. So I want to know about the other properties of the Mormon god. Is he infinite is actual extent; if he omnipresent; is he omnipotent?
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That been said,

Religion has been so persistent because childs absorb many basic premises from very little, which are likely very hard to change as an adult. I wouldn't know, my parents always told me that when people were still in caves looked around and lacking and answer for the things they saw, they invented a god, a shortcut, cheating, simple answer to explain it.

Now I recognize that it was also a very important conceptual development.

Shalom Shabbat

The naturalistic view was not easily attained and it took a long time to develop. When life was very hard, very short and in many instances very nasty one can hardly blame people for clutching at a view that at least made some sense of the difficulties. It was only after the beginning of agriculture and the rise of cities and towns that -some- people had the leisure and safety to think things through more clearly. Some time in the 6th century b.c.e. the erosions of the magic view of nature began in several places in the world. Greece was one of these places (along with Babylon, India and China) where some kind of law and regularity based view of the world began to emerge. Being of the West we are most familiar with the emergence of naturalism in Greece. Emergence I say. The process was not complete even in Athens were a residual belief in the gods existed. Fully developed naturalism appeared in Europe in the time of the Enlightenment. It was a long time coming and we should not be too harsh on those who lived before us a long time ago. Al beginnings are hard.

Even today, when the thunder is loud and lightning strikes everywhere and nearby many of us experience a frisson of fear. And we know what lightning is. But it still inspires a bit of awe and fear. And when a nearby volcano erupts it is a rare person who does not get a knot in the pit of his stomach. I call that the Holy Shit!!! reaction. It is very natural. Our visceral reactions are not totally under the control of our cerebral cortex.

BTW, one says Shabbot Shalom. The adjective in Hebrew, follows the noun it modifies.

ruveyn

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The naturalistic view was not easily attained and it took a long time to develop. When life was very hard, very short and in many instances very nasty one can hardly blame people for clutching at a view that at least made some sense of the difficulties. It was only after the beginning of agriculture and the rise of cities and towns that -some- people had the leisure and safety to think things through more clearly. Some time in the 6th century b.c.e. the erosions of the magic view of nature began in several places in the world. Greece was one of these places (along with Babylon, India and China) where some kind of law and regularity based view of the world began to emerge. Being of the West we are most familiar with the emergence of naturalism in Greece. Emergence I say. The process was not complete even in Athens were a residual belief in the gods existed. Fully developed naturalism appeared in Europe in the time of the Enlightenment. It was a long time coming and we should not be too harsh on those who lived before us a long time ago. Al beginnings are hard.

Even today, when the thunder is loud and lightning strikes everywhere and nearby many of us experience a frisson of fear. And we know what lightning is. But it still inspires a bit of awe and fear. And when a nearby volcano erupts it is a rare person who does not get a knot in the pit of his stomach. I call that the Holy Shit!!! reaction. It is very natural. Our visceral reactions are not totally under the control of our cerebral cortex.

Yes that was part of my point. I should note that it was with the advent of urban civilization that a naturalistic view emerged - and was to an extent tolerated.

While the advent of intensive agriculture (Egypt i.e.) was the prime cause for the emergence of Organized Religion (the practical exploitation of magic).

I still remark that religion was an advance because it provided the other, more intellectual side of might: fraud in addition to mere force.

BTW, one says Shabbot Shalom. The adjective in Hebrew, follows the noun it modifies.

ruveyn

True! but interestingly enough, in Buenos Aires many observing jews greet Shalom Shabat, with heavy A sound. There're other particularities like "Leija" or the pronounciation of Chabad "Schabad" instead of "Habad" .

I'm often surprised to learn details of Mormonism, like the sacred underwear thing, the idea that god was originally a mortal on the planet Kolob. So I want to know about the other properties of the Mormon god. Is he infinite is actual extent; if he omnipresent; is he omnipotent?

I am intrigued as well. I sort of consider it the Scientology of the XIX c.

In any case I'm pretty sure they refer to God as "Heavenly Father". The fact that they prefer not to speak the name of god, also reminds me of the jewish use of "G'd"

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