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I have a 2 and half year old I read to every night. Currently we enjoy Where the Wild Things Are, Curious George, Margaret Wise Brown and Eric Carle books. I recently discovered Oliver Jeffers children's books which we like very much. Anyone else have any good recommends for me?

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I have a 2 and half year old I read to every night. Currently we enjoy Where the Wild Things Are, Curious George, Margaret Wise Brown and Eric Carle books. I recently discovered Oliver Jeffers children's books which we like very much. Anyone else have any good recommends for me?

I have never heard of Oliver Jeffers. Thanks for mentioning him!

I love all of Margaret Wise Brown's work. She was a wonderful author!

Hmmm.. I loved reading the Lyle the Crocodile series to my son when he was very little, and to his little sisters, as well as Ira Sleeps over, by Bernard Waber.

Here is a link to a list of his books:

http://www.houghtonmifflinbooks.com/author...aberbooks.shtml

I also enjoyed Syd Hoff's books as a child (Danny and the Dinosaur, for example).

Now, I know some may not agree with this selection, but I also love Love You Forever by Robert Muncsh.

Anything by Beatrix Potter, as well as Winnie the Pooh stories (not the Disney books, but the original ones. No offense to Disney, but the original ones are the best in my book!)

When you child gets old (or maybe even now), I highly recommend Chika-Chicka Boom! Boom! Also, Eic Carle books, such as The Hungry Catepillar have been enjoyed by my kids.

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Shouldn't this be in fiction?

I can't say I recommend "The Rainbow Fish" as it indoctrinates children into collectivism, altruism and some weird allegory of communism. But I do like that Author's "Penguin Pete" series.

"It's Raining Meatballs", "Bamboozled" and "Ted" all are very well illustrated, but I don't know how well these would go over with Objectivist parenting since they show the world in a way that isn't real. I still find them interesting. "Where the wild things are" also goes wildly (no pun intended) beyond reality into fantasy.

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I have a 2 and half year old I read to every night. Currently we enjoy Where the Wild Things Are, Curious George, Margaret Wise Brown and Eric Carle books. I recently discovered Oliver Jeffers children's books which we like very much. Anyone else have any good recommends for me?

Check out the "frog and toad" books by Arnold Lobel. There are four different books that I know of, each with five or six short stories. They're fun and well-written in general, and a few of the stories (e.g., "the kite" from "days with frog and toad") have particularly good philosophical themes.

We've also really enjoyed some of Robert McCloskey's books, especially "one morning in maine" and "blueberries for sal". Nothing particularly Objectivist or philosophical about these, but they're good stories with some nice science/nature-ish and pro-values themes, and they have a very calm, measured style that I find refreshing.

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I have a 2 and half year old I read to every night. Currently we enjoy Where the Wild Things Are, Curious George, Margaret Wise Brown and Eric Carle books. I recently discovered Oliver Jeffers children's books which we like very much. Anyone else have any good recommends for me?

Have you heard of An Island Called Liberty? It has been described as "a cross between Dr. Seuss and Ayn Rand". I purchased this for my niece when she turned 2. She really doesn't notice the philosophy one way or the other, of course, but she loves to hear the story. I was never able to find a copy in our local libraries, but you can purchase it online. (Or you can do as I did...purchase 2 copies and donate one to your local library so that the next adorable little free-thinker will have better access to good ideas!) It's by Joseph Specht, by the way, and the following is an excerpt from the text:

"Inside is the story of a right friendly land,

Where people were quick to lend a free hand.

With the best of intentions they passed many laws,

To fix what they felt were quite fixable flaws.

But the fixes, they found, were too much in the end,

For bureaus and programs and taxes they penned.

Once the lessons were learned, here's what they knew:

The contentment of many can't come from the few."

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