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Marzshox

Silicon Vally emerged from Roswell, Technology

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A friend recommended me this book.

The synopsis is that technology such as microchips, military stealth and other technologies were developed as the result of our Government obtaining alien technologies.

My immediate feeling is that such a reality is possible. However, I feel that aliens would not deliberately share any such technologies with a nuclear crazed world population.

It is then, that my friend coined in that the technology was not given to us, but found at the Roswell crash site. Then, reverse engineered. And poof, technology existed!

The reality that begins to unfold, is that humans simply lacked the capacity to innovate much less create our modern world.

That is interesting...

However, whatever technology found at a crash site would surely be limited. As to not be able to account for the wide spectrum of increasingly limitless varieties of technologies that exist today.

Just the fact that processors and technical components become more advanced every year, shows that humans are quite versatile in understanding and developing new waves of the future.

This entire conversation emerged from a question that derived in my mind...

A question about human capacity to create amazing technological feats. (Such as a space ship, a computer, or a visual display.)

What intellectual requirements does one possess in order to break things down on a chalk board, understand everything, and bring it all to fruition...

Does University really mold fine minds, enabling such creative ability?? ...Or is there an imaginative experimental curiosity that leads to such "linear" advancements?

 

Edited by Marzshox
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The way I see it, the people who think technology literally came from aliens don't actually recognize what is required of creativity and invention. Even if there was a UFO crash and some engineers reverse engineered a computer, to expand on the technology requires immense understanding of what led up to it.

I am extremely interested in the field of psychology of creativity. To be sure, it is important to understand philosophically what the meaning of creation is and what it logically depends upon. But for a complete understanding, psychology is also required. To be clear, my answer here is focused on psychology, not the social requirements politically speaking, or a broad answer in terms of ethics.

Universities do not themselves create creative ability. All they really can do is create a space for research, or transmit existing knowledge. From my own research in terms of books I've read, and my own pursuits with psychology, creativity is fundamentally about altering your conceptual structure in order to gain a new understanding of the world before you. That would be a theory of discontinuous development - it isn't linear, and it isn't just a matter of learning more. That's why a crashed spaceship would not really enable new technologies, because all the people looking at it are thinking in an existing conceptual structure with specific premises. Imagine the state of medicine now, compared to when people spoke about the four humors. Before it was theorized that germs cause disease, people thought about sickness in a totally different way.

A sense of curiosity and openness to experiences are pieces of how new ideas are generated - psychology research bears this out. Of existing measures of creativity (there is no measure for simply creativity though, but there are  ways to measure aspects of creativity) IQ isn't a big factor, but it does help up to 120.

Is this the sort of answer you are looking for?

Edited by Eiuol

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I think the role of college is not so much to teach anything you can't learn on your own (you can learn pretty much everything on your own, these days, in most fields), it's more to help young minds put their abilities to good use, by teaching them how to organize their work, how to work as part of a team, how to follow/interpret instructions etc.

If a college education does that well, it's worth having. If it doesn't, then you're probably better off learning on your own...because you'll learn everything you need faster than the average of four years it takes to go to college.

I'm sorry, is this thread about aliens? I've seen no evidence of aliens, but if we were ever to be visited by some, it would be in the form of (robotic or genetic...or a combination of the two) technology so advanced and different from our own that it would most likely do nothing to help human technology advance. Simply because that's what it would take to get here in the first place. It would be like Voyager 1 landing in the middle of a bronze age village...it wouldn't help them discover space travel technology, they'd just look at it as an undecipherable curiosity.

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On 6/22/2016 at 0:32 PM, Eiuol said:

The way I see it, the people who think technology literally came from aliens don't actually recognize what is required of creativity and invention. Even if there was a UFO crash and some engineers reverse engineered a computer, to expand on the technology requires immense understanding of what led up to it.

I am extremely interested in the field of psychology of creativity. To be sure, it is important to understand philosophically what the meaning of creation is and what it logically depends upon. But for a complete understanding, psychology is also required. To be clear, my answer here is focused on psychology, not the social requirements politically speaking, or a broad answer in terms of ethics.

Universities do not themselves create creative ability. All they really can do is create a space for research, or transmit existing knowledge. From my own research in terms of books I've read, and my own pursuits with psychology, creativity is fundamentally about altering your conceptual structure in order to gain a new understanding of the world before you. That would be a theory of discontinuous development - it isn't linear, and it isn't just a matter of learning more. That's why a crashed spaceship would not really enable new technologies, because all the people looking at it are thinking in an existing conceptual structure with specific premises. Imagine the state of medicine now, compared to when people spoke about the four humors. Before it was theorized that germs cause disease, people thought about sickness in a totally different way.

A sense of curiosity and openness to experiences are pieces of how new ideas are generated - psychology research bears this out. Of existing measures of creativity (there is no measure for simply creativity though, but there are  ways to measure aspects of creativity) IQ isn't a big factor, but it does help up to 120.

Is this the sort of answer you are looking for?

Thank you for an interesting response. You made some great points.

I guess what I am left with considering, is how on earth one could obtain the level of creativity needed to create advanced technologies...

Such as understanding of say, creating transmissible data, through optic cables that break down an image into bytes, travel such data through optic cables, and then recreate the image on a PC Monitor, half way across the globe.

(Sorry if that is a mouth full.)

Such a technically complex action is greatly possible due to human innovation. I just would like to believe that such a person with highly advanced technical know how who has conceived such modern phenomenon, likely lives in some sanctuary of the mind, where average people simply will never lay eyes.

 

On 6/23/2016 at 6:40 PM, Nicky said:

(COLLEGE) it's more to help young minds put their abilities to good use, by teaching them how to organize their work, how to work as part of a team, how to follow/interpret instructions etc.

Very lovely way of explaining what higher education is presumably good for. (Organizing the mind and creating efficient pupils who can grapple with life's demands and apply themselves effectively.)

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10 minutes ago, Marzshox said:

Thank you for an interesting response. You made some great points.

I guess what I am left with considering, is how on earth one could obtain the level of creativity needed to create advanced technologies.

Technology advances incrementally. Most often, in very, very tiny increments, that require tedious work and patience, more than creativity.

Sometimes, a bigger jump is made due to a creative plan or daring, visionary decision-making, sure, but, most advances are of the tedious, incremental kind.

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It's very interesting what you're mentioning but in my opinion I say that it was us humans that created such technologies. Yes, throughout history there have been many questions of how things were created or built such as the Pyramids of Giza, but then again just because the humans may have not been fully capable or didn't have the technology, it doesn't mean we weren't able to do it. You see, Leonardo Da Vinci was a great inventor back in his time. Did he have help from aliens? We don't know, but why question the power of the human mind? Haven't we constructed the society that we have presently by ourselves? Thanks to the Nazis' experiments many scientific advances were made. They for a fact did not have help from aliens, then again there are some theories that they did. In fact there is a theory that they even created a teleportation machine, but since there is not much evidence to back the story it's just a theory. I do believe that we shouldn't be the only living beings in the universe, what I don't believe is that we aren't capable of building the things we already have. 

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