Jump to content
Objectivism Online Forum

This is madness

Rate this topic


Recommended Posts

I get the impression that if you go fast enough, it'll leap through time!
Sounds like a good idea for a movie: Guy invents time traveling motorcycle, goes back in time, crashes a sock-hop, accidentally gets his mom to fall in love with him, wails on a guitar, and then sets everything right again before coming back to the future.

OMG, we're going to be millionaires.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Sweet looking ride, but I wouldn't want to ride it a 1000 miles at a stretch! :P
Ahhh, a member of the IBA, I reckon? Man, I love riding, but I don't know if I'd be up for Saddlesore, and I'd never even consider Bunburner. But, maybe I just haven't been on the right bike. The biggest and most comfortable bike I've ridden is a '72 H-D Shovelhead (V-Twin 1200cc), which isn't exactly a touring bike. Edited by Alexandros
Link to post
Share on other sites
Ahhh, a member of the IBA, I reckon? Man, I love riding, but I don't know if I'd be up for Saddlesore, and I'd never even consider Bunburner. But, maybe I just haven't been on the right bike. The biggest and most comfortable bike I've ridden is a '72 H-D Shovelhead (V-Twin 1200cc), which isn't exactly a touring bike.

Yea, I have 2 Saddlesores under my belt and I'm doing a Bunburner next year. The organizers of the ride next year are going to route the ride around the various 911 sites (as much as they can and still keep to interstates). I ride an 06 Ultra Classic as its made for long hauls and comfort. Still, 19 or so hours even on that bike is taxing. The last ride I did we rode 7 of those hours in the rain, at times a considerably strong rain.

You could say I love riding. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Anyone got any advice as to how to get started riding? I'm interested in a crotch-rocket type sportbike but I know those are not what you really want to be starting out with...don't want to end up like Ben Roethlisberger. So far the only bike I ride is the pedaling kind.

Motorcycle Safety Foundation -- courses taught with small motorcycles provided

Also recommended: Proficient Motorcycling: The Ultimate Guide to Riding Well

Edited by Trebor
Link to post
Share on other sites

To further Trebor's recommendation, I've taken the Basic Rider Course by the MSF. It is a very good course to learn the basics of riding. The one I went through was not a "gimme" either, you are taught skills that you are expected to demonstrate in a series of tests at the end. 3 people out of 12 in my class did not get their MSF certification at the end. The bikes you ride on are small, very small in comparison to most street bikes today. They are easier to control, but heavier bikes are not that much harder to control if you learn what they teach.

Aside from learning to teach you how to ride, passing the course may allow you to skip the riding and/or written examination to get a motorcycle endorsement on your license. Check with you state's DMV to find out. Additionally, some insurance companies will discount your bike insurance rate upon successful completion. A study, done some time back, cited that you roughly 50% less likely to be involved in a motorcycle crash if you had formal riding training. That said, keep in mind that general statistics show that you are more likely to be involved in an accident on a motorcycle (compared to cars) and even more for that accident to be fatal. I don't say this to discourage you, because the statistics are still really low. I just think riders should really educate themselves about what they are getting into.

Here's a link to some (more or less) recent data from the NHSTA.

All that said, I ride a LOT. On average I put more miles on my bike during the year than my car, around 11,000 miles a year right now.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would offer a tad more about the size of bike you get. I don't know how this pans our for females, but I would venture many, if not most, new rider males who buy motorcycles buy too small to begin with. Almost invariably, they "outgrow" the bike really quickly as they become more confident riders. It's understandable because when it is new to you, you want to make sure you have something that you feel like you can handle. So yea, you want a bike you can handle, but you also want a bike that you are willing to keep a while if you are at all economically-minded.

I've never ridden sport bikes, so I can't tell you much about that specific kind of riding but I do know this - they are typically light and made for acceleration, speed and maneuverability. Countless videos on Youtube will show you that they are often light enough to flip over if you roll too hard on the throttle from the start (and some even while moving).

Let me know when you can do this. ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, MSF courses are good. I stay away from teaching new people how to ride.

As for that bike...LOL! Brakes are enough, but the weigh distribution is a mess. S, no, it probably wouldn't stop well at all. Gonna drag on the ground hard when someone tries to turn too.

As for how fast? What's the power output? Doesn't look like a newer engine as it doesn't have stick coils. There are lighter and very powerful motorcycle engines out there. I still like the execution of the look.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...