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I need help on several fields in the music theory in different school of styles(for example, the baroque school, the classical school, the romantic school, etc.):

1) Harmony. In each school I need help with what harmoney would be considered "appropriate".

2) Chord Progressions. Are there different chord progressions for each school? If so whaat are they? And can I just put a series of chords togather calling it a chord progression?

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I need help on several fields in the music theory in different school of styles(for example, the baroque school, the classical school, the romantic school, etc.):

1) Harmony. In each school I need help with what harmoney would be considered "appropriate".

2) Chord Progressions. Are there different chord progressions for each school? If so whaat are they? And can I just put a series of chords togather calling it a chord progression?

Second part I can give an indication as I am not trained, but have played guiter forever. There are different types of chord progression for any type of music. The easiest example would be a blues chord progression I-IV-I-V-I (will many modifications possible). The whole progression is based on the blues scale.

Each "style" music uses a certain scale and this will determine chord progressions. That is why country uses major pentatonic and so forth, and classical is based primarily on the major and minor scales.

And you can throw any chords together and call it a progression in the same way that you can put any series of notes together and call it a melody, or any random series of events together and call it a plot - in other words no. Note the word chord progression.

Note that the knowledge of chords in music comes from a knowledge of scales and are derived from them. As for specifics, I forgot the details long ago, now I just play for my own amusement!

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I need help on several fields in the music theory in different school of styles(for example, the baroque school, the classical school, the romantic school, etc.):

1) Harmony. In each school I need help with what harmoney would be considered "appropriate".

2) Chord Progressions. Are there different chord progressions for each school? If so whaat are they? And can I just put a series of chords togather calling it a chord progression?

Tonic - I

Intermediate - III, VI (can also serve as substitute for I in deceptive cadence)

Sub-dominant - II, IV

Dominant - V, vii diminished

Baroque, Classical & Romantic all follow the basic outline of Tonal Theory regarding chord progressions:

Tonic, then Intermediate, then Sub-dominant, then Dominant, return to Tonic.

This can be reduced to:

Tonic, Dominant, Tonic

Dominant, Tonic

Tonic, Intermediate, Dominant, Tonic

Tonic, Sub-dominant, Dominant, Tonic

Notice the primary goal is always the proper cadence: Dominant, Tonic

It is also possible to prolong the progression, for example:

Tonic, Intermediate, Tonic, Sub-dominant, Intermediate, Dominant, Tonic.

Notice the goal remains the same. From there you need to understand the concept of applied dominant. If you are in C major, you can construct a chord progression such as:

I, iii, ii, V, I

(being: C maj, E min, D min, G7, C maj)

In order to "fill out" the piece, make it more beautiful, richly complex & "prepare for the arrival" of the E min from the C maj you can do this:

I, ii of iii, V of iii, iii...& so forth

(being: C maj, F# min, B7, E min...)

So you have deviated from pure C major, and are temporarily in the key of E minor but only long enough to prepare for its arrival, then you return to key of C major.

Notice the concept of the Goal-Directed Chord Progression of Tonal Theory remains the same.

The premise that drives this concept is voice leading. Voice leading is regarding all the notes that comprise a chord as one note of a "voice". As you move to the next chord you regard each note as moving to the next corresponding note in that next chord. Again without music it is cumbersome to show, but....

Say you have a C major chord spelled low to high

C, E, G

Then the next chord is G major spelled low to high

B, D, G

The bottom "voice" moves from C to B, the middle voice moves from E to D & the top voice remains stationary at G. Notice that the bottom voice moves down a half step, middle voice moves down a whole step (similar motion between these 2 - down in the same direction) & the top voice being stationary is oblique motion to give it even more variety. Keep in mind that minimal movement is not always the "rule" or "goal" but it helps to think that way to start with when you are learning.

If I just moved from a C E G up or down to a G B D, then all of my voices would merely go up or down a fifth (not to mention a great deal of "voice crossing" which can be bad depending on the context). I would have no independent voice motion & thus no justification for using more than one note at a time. The other voices would be merely "shadowing" or "mimicing" not voices in their own right.

"Smooth" voice leading is the "goal" of well-constructed music. This is a VERY simple example but it is the basic idea & has amazingly far reaching implications.

Many theorists & composers also regard voice leading as not merely a chordal analysis tool but an essential way of creating independent & yet interweaving melodies. This is very true in Bach, for although at any time you can isolate a chord based on all the notes that are sounding at one time the more important thing to him was that each voice carried it own melodic thread. So if you have (like Bach did in many of his classic 4 part chorales) a piece that all the way through uses four note chords it is constructed in a way that if you follow say the top note of every chord ("the top voice") you will find a complete melody; & likewise for the other 3 voices.

There are, of course, differences between the styles/eras (Baroque, Classical, Romantic), but it is impossible to understand or place them in context without first knowing their foundation similarities.

If this helps, I can go into detail on the differences in a future post.

The easiest example would be a blues chord progression I-IV-I-V-I (will many modifications possible). The whole progression is based on the blues scale.

Actually it is not. I am not trying to be a hair-splitting asshole here, Thoyd Loki! The V chord is important because it contains the leading tone (the seventh note of the major scale). But neither pentatonic major nor minor contains a leading tone. You can of course modify your playing (put back in the appropriate diatonic notes that pentatonic avoids) when playing blues & the V chord comes around (I always do! Can't not do it, drives me up the wall when the tonic is not prepared). In fact this is why some blues players/songs sound better or more integrated/satisfying (at least to me) because they contain this modification.

And you can throw any chords together and call it a progression in the same way that you can put any series of notes together and call it a melody, or any random series of events together and call it a plot - in other words no. Note the word chord progression.

This is very funny and true! It goes back to the point about melody & chord progressions being goal directed which is why Tonal Theory exists in the first place.

Here is an excellent site dealing with a study & analysis of Tonality & Perception:

Tone and Voice: Derivation of the Rules of Voice-leading from Perceptual Principles

It's stated goal is "A theory is proposed to account for the aesthetic origin of voice-leading practices." It was originally published in the journal Music Perception.

In addition it is valuable to have & use Fux's book on counterpoint: Study of Counterpoint

As well as Salzer's impressive work based on Schenker's Theory of Tonal Music:

Structural Hearing: Tonal Coherence in Music

This site has good introductory information on Schenker's theory:

Schenker Guide Website

Christopher Schlegel

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Actually it is not.  I am not trying to be a hair-splitting asshole here, Thoyd Loki!  The V chord is important because it contains the leading tone (the seventh note of the major scale).  But neither pentatonic major nor minor contains a leading tone.  You can of course modify your playing (put back in the appropriate diatonic notes that pentatonic avoids) when playing blues & the V chord comes around (I always do!  Can't not do it, drives me up the wall when the tonic is not prepared).  In fact this is why some blues players/songs sound better or more integrated/satisfying (at least to me) because they contain this modification.

I do stand corrected on that, thanks. I have to get off the distortion pedal so I can play some full chords again!

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I do stand corrected on that, thanks. I have to get off the distortion pedal so I can play some full chords again!

Ha! That's good stuff.

But, wait! You don't have to get off the pedal; keep it cranked up loud & proud.

Blast your way through the blues scale, but keep in mind which notes of the scale are part of the chord that is currently happening & which chord is coming up. Just use the leading tone when the V chord comes around.

If you are curious/interested I can post a couple of "bluesy" licks & turnarounds that contain melodic modifications of the pentatonic scales as examples.

Christopher Schlegel

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  • 4 weeks later...
Ha!  That's good stuff.

But, wait!  You don't have to get off the pedal; keep it cranked up loud & proud.

Blast your way through the blues scale, but keep in mind which notes of the scale are part of the chord that is currently happening & which chord is coming up.  Just use the leading tone when the V chord comes around.

If you are curious/interested I can post a couple of "bluesy" licks & turnarounds that contain melodic modifications of the pentatonic scales as examples.

Christopher Schlegel

I'd be interested in that as well...

I got some cool mods to the blues scales I use alot as well (like the scale Hendrix uses in Red House..), but you probably know them.

BTW, did you go to music school?

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Ha!  That's good stuff.

But, wait!  You don't have to get off the pedal; keep it cranked up loud & proud.

Blast your way through the blues scale, but keep in mind which notes of the scale are part of the chord that is currently happening & which chord is coming up.  Just use the leading tone when the V chord comes around.

If you are curious/interested I can post a couple of "bluesy" licks & turnarounds that contain melodic modifications of the pentatonic scales as examples.

Christopher Schlegel

I'm sorry, I totally missed your reply! Yes I would be interested, if you still have time that would be great, thankyou!

I wasn't specific about the distortion deal. I like distortion, but only if it is the clean type through a Marshall turned up loud enough to get it hot. But, I live in an apartment so I've been using the artificial stuff through a Crate(!). I love an E7 (full chord, not the two finger job) but I'm very picky about what kind of distortion I have, I don't like it muddy, but tough and punchy.

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I'd be interested in that as well...

BTW, did you go to music school?

I was a professional musician/private instructor (guitar & theory) for 15 years.

I am now working as an IT guy for a small private college (last 5 years); music on the side as a small biz & avocation. Much more productive situation at this point in my life as I place more value on my wife, kid & buying a home. That's right, now I am old, boring, married...& very happy!

Ironically, after all these years, the college allows employee's to take class free, so I am getting a BA in music (applied & theory). Should be getting that degree this spring, in fact.

I'm sorry, I totally missed your reply! Yes I would be interested, if you still have time that would be great, thankyou!

No need for apologies, man. I will gladly post some things. I have a folder on my website that I use for this kind of info. I will upload some docs/files & point you all to them in future posts.

Questions for both of you:

1. Can you read music? Is tab preferable?

2. Will you please go to powertabs.net & get their free program? This will aid greatly in dissemination of info in the context of music ideas for guitar. Also the site has a database of tunes other people have uploaded. You may be able to find something of value there.

Christopher Schlegel

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OK. Everything is up here: Music Theory on TATW

First is an image that shows how to "see" the chord tones in the context of the first position minor pentatonic scale (the "box blues" shape).

Next you can download the PowerTabs program & install it on your box.

Next you can download a few sample 12-bar blues licks.

Lemme know if this is too simple, just right, too much, etc.

I will talk more about the stuff when I have time for details.

Play well.

Christopher Schlegel

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OK.  Everything is up here: Music Theory on TATW

First is an image that shows how to "see" the chord tones in the context of the first position minor pentatonic scale (the "box blues" shape).

Next you can download the PowerTabs program & install it on your box.

Next you can download a few sample 12-bar blues licks.

Lemme know if this is too simple, just right, too much, etc.

I will talk more about the stuff when I have time for details.

Play well.

Christopher Schlegel

Thank you!

I will check it out when I get home from work, and get back to you on it tonight or tommorow...

I am transferring to school for music as well, although my focus will be on composition. Fortunately, (for me) I am unmarried and will be able to dedicate a large portion of my attention to my music major. My primary desire is to develop the ability to translate my ideas into reality and write different instrumental parts to have played by various instrumentalists; I want to create orchestral compositions for my music, which is a mixture of soul, folk, breakbeats, rock, and several other styles that have inspired my own personal style.

I can read sheet music, and have powertab. It is a great program, and I use it alot for creating exercises (especially arpeggio and sweeping ones). I recently had to format my home computer, so I do need to build another collection of exercises and licks.

May I ask..How has your experiance in music school been? I imagine you went into it already knowing quite alot. I am going to start private teaching, and performing acoustically next year to pay the bills while I attend school. I have been learning the 5th Caprice for my audition, and my aural skills and sight singing abilities are already beyond where I need them to be to get accepted. I am just curious as to the rigorousness of music programs, and personal experiance others have had with these programs.

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Thank you!

You're welcome, too.

Thank you!

It is a great program, and I use it alot for creating exercises (especially arpeggio and sweeping ones).

Yeah, I like the feature that allows you to import/export MIDI data. I can bounce from Cakewalk to PowerTabs to Finale in order to get notation, scores, backing tracks, audio objects, etc. Very wonderful stuff. You can sweep & such? Good stuff, I have all kinds of wild fast things I do in the context of blues & jazz. I will get around to uploading that....next week? Time is all I need...& what I don't have enough of...

May I ask..How has your experiance in music school been? I imagine you went into it already knowing quite alot...

I was self-taught, so taking the classes was a breeze. Sometimes a bit boring, but there were a few teachers that, after I proved myself & asked for more, gave me more challenging material & went into more depth than the basic curriculum. My teacher for Music Theory 4 was great. We did the whole textbook quickly & then she launched deeply into Schenkerian theory. Incredible stuff. I learned a great deal there.

The worst was having to do the "core curriculum" stuff. It was very easy, but there were only so many things I could CLEP or test out of. Some things just aren't offered in that format, so I had to "grind it out".

The guitar instructor is a good friend of mine so we had a blast. Since I already know how to play we did a bunch of jazz things (his specialty & passion). Typically we would spend a couple of weeks at the beginning of the semester doing Bach & standard curriculum exercises just to get the requirements out of the way...then spend the rest of the semester doing fun, monsterously difficult things. He taught me a ton of Joe Pass things. We transcribed Ellington tunes, Art Tatum interpretations, all kinds of fun, challenging things. I don't suppose my "school experience" has been anything close to typical.

You are doing Paganini's 5th? That's great. Ever heard Fisk do it? Wow, that guy is amazing. Years ago I learned a "bastardized" version of it. Mostly the arpeggios & part of the main melody. Grew up listening to Blackmore & then Malmsteen; & I've always loved classical (even though those rock guys are really more baroque). Just recently I got the score for that out again & was toying around with it. My absolute favorite is Beethoven; I have done a few transcriptions of his pieces for solo guitar.

I am to do my senior recital this spring. I am doing some solo classical things: Bach (of course), Beethoven, Tarrega, etc. & then "rock" arrangements of Beethoven's 9th, William Tell Overture, "Far Beyond The Sun", maybe another Malmsteem & old Van Halen tunes. Get out the strat & marshall!

I will always love & play guitar, but these days my primary musical focus is composition & arrangement. I have one of my symphonies posted on my site for free download if you are interested. Go here: Symphony 6 "The Values of Man"

Christopher Schlegel

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Christopher, I know that most of that stuff is basic-level, but that theory post was RIGHTEOUS! I think I sorely needed that. I've never seen such a concise overview!

If you're starting a list of some sort, then I want in!

Keep up the great work!

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I think I sorely needed that.  I've never seen such a concise overview!

If you're starting a list of some sort, then I want in!

Glad you got something out of it. I could talk theory (& practice!) for days. I have just recently started a "music theory" thread (on a forum hosted by a musician friend of mine). Let me get some details straightened out & I will point you to it.

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You're welcome, too.

Yeah, I like the feature that allows you to import/export MIDI data.  I can bounce from Cakewalk to PowerTabs to Finale in order to get notation, scores, backing tracks, audio objects, etc.  Very wonderful stuff.  You can sweep & such?  Good stuff, I have all kinds of wild fast things I do in the context of blues & jazz.  I will get around to uploading that....next week?  Time is all I need...& what I don't have enough of...

I don't use the computer for music much. I have a pretty old labtop at home I just use for tabs, ear training, and the internet in general. I am currently saving up for a Powermac, which I should have in the next couple of months. I am pretty good at sweeping. I can cleanly bang out triplets at 115 bpm, but I have only been practicing them for a couple months. Although when I started sweeping I was only doing triplets at about 80 bpm, so I am progressing very well. I try to bring it up a couple bpms per week.

I was self-taught, so taking the classes was a breeze.  Sometimes a bit boring, but there were a few teachers that, after I proved myself & asked for more, gave me more challenging material & went into more depth than the basic curriculum.  My teacher for Music Theory 4 was great.  We did the whole textbook quickly & then she launched deeply into Schenkerian theory.  Incredible stuff.  I learned a great deal there.

I was self taught for years, but last year I did a paper on the acquisition and maintenence of expert performance, and one of the key aspects I found that was parralled in several domains was that expert performance was mostly attained through thousands of hours of supervised, deliberate practice (practice designed to improve, and not merely playing for amusement i.e. just learning tabs). I have learned so much since then, especially the way I approach playing. My picking speed and improvisation skills have improved more in the past year then they have in the 5 years of playing I had on and off prior to lessons.

The worst was having to do the "core curriculum" stuff.  It was very easy, but there were only so many things I could CLEP or test out of.  Some things just aren't offered in that format, so I had to "grind it out".
How was your experiance in regards to aural training? I am doing aural training right now and I was wondering if you knew of any good computer programs to help me along the way. I am doing quite well in sight-singing, and I can bang out all the diatonic intervals vocally. I am also taking italian singing lessons. I found that the italian school of singing has the most to offer in terms of technique. I have always been a decent singer, but I find these lessons are helping me incredibaly in enhancing my technique.

The guitar instructor is a good friend of mine so we had a blast.  Since I already know how to play we did a bunch of jazz things (his specialty & passion).  Typically we would spend a couple of weeks at the beginning of the semester doing Bach & standard curriculum exercises just to get the requirements out of the way...then spend the rest of the semester doing fun, monsterously difficult things.  He taught me a ton of Joe Pass things.  We transcribed Ellington tunes, Art Tatum interpretations, all kinds of fun, challenging things.  I don't suppose my "school experience" has been anything close to typical.

This is what I am hoping to find in my school experiance: a challenging environmet with like minded musicians. The great thing about good musicians is that even though they might not share your particular tastes, they feel the same passion you have for music and you can learn alot through their contrasting styles.

You are doing Paganini's 5th?  That's great.  Ever heard Fisk do it?  Wow, that guy is amazing.  Years ago I learned a "bastardized" version of it.  Mostly the arpeggios & part of the main melody.  Grew up listening to Blackmore & then Malmsteen; & I've always loved classical (even though those rock guys are really more baroque).  Just recently I got the score for that out again & was toying around with it.  My absolute favorite is Beethoven; I have done a few transcriptions of his pieces for solo guitar.
I have yet to hear a guitar version of it, besides the bastardized version from the movie Crossroads. It is a pain in the ass song. I have about a qaurter of it down. I am only rehearsing it at 85 bpm (it is straight 16th notes). After I have the motor movements perfected at a slower speed I plan on pushing it untill I get up 130-140 bpm. I am spending an hour a night on it, and plan on having the peice memorized by the end of this month. Then I will spend about 7 months bringing it up to speed. I am still trying to figure out what to do about the opening arpeggios, as you can't hit the last arpeggio on the guitar. I will end up either cutting out the top note on each arpeggio, or maybe try harmonics. Got any ideas?

I am to do my senior recital this spring.  I am doing some solo classical things:  Bach (of course), Beethoven, Tarrega, etc.  & then "rock" arrangements of Beethoven's 9th, William Tell Overture, "Far Beyond The Sun", maybe another Malmsteem & old Van Halen tunes.  Get out the strat & marshall!

That is sweet! Far Beyond the Sun will be real interesting, as I am sure alot of the people there will have no clue it is a yngie song. I want to do some more Pagannini for my recitals, I already plan on doing Moto Perpetuo as a duet. You should record your recital, I would love to hear! BTW, I am a strat and marshall man myself. I have several guitars, but my main rig is a 2004 Fender Deluxe 50th Edition Sunburst Strat ran through a compressor into a Marshall MG250. :thumbsup:

I will always love & play guitar, but these days my primary musical focus is composition & arrangement.  I have one of my symphonies posted on my site for free download if you are interested.  Go here: Symphony 6 "The Values of Man"

Christopher Schlegel

That is awesome! I have only had a chance to listen to a little so far, but I like what I hear. I think you do a great job of encompassing the Objectivist philosophy in your works. You are the first Objectivist composer I have met, and I applaud that. That is what I would expect Objectivist compositions to to sound like on the emotional level, that is, it brings images of heriosm to mind. Have you ever thought of getting a full ensemble to play your music? That would put the icing on the cake...

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How was your experiance in regards to aural training?

That was all very easy for me having played for years. I can't sing very well, but that never stopped me. I've been singing in original & cover bands for years also. The only glich was learning Italian enough to sing it "properly". But I only had to do 1 semester of that. The only music class I got a B in. Shucks.

I have yet to hear a guitar version of it, besides the bastardized version from the movie Crossroads...I am still trying to figure out what to do about the opening arpeggios, as you can't hit the last arpeggio on the guitar. I will end up either cutting out the top note on each arpeggio, or maybe try harmonics. Got any ideas?

You really need to hear Eliot Fisk, man. Really.

You can go to his Eliot Fisk Homepage

& hear samples of his playing or even buy one of his CDs from Eliot Fisk Paganini Caprices CD through cdbaby.com

Which I was surprised to find since they are also my web vendor.

I have a transcription of his arrangement of the 5th somewhere in my home office/studio. I will find it & send you a copy if you wish. The cdbaby.com page offers that piece as one of the samples. That guy is amazing.

Stop reading my post & go listen to it NOW!!!

That is awesome! I have only had a chance to listen to a little so far, but I like what I hear. I think you do a great job of encompassing the Objectivist philosophy in your works. You are the first Objectivist composer I have met, and I applaud that. That is what I would expect Objectivist compositions to to sound like on the emotional level, that is, it brings images of heriosm to mind. Have you ever thought of getting a full ensemble to play your music? That would put the icing on the cake...

Thank you for listening & responding favorably. I am glad you have enjoyed what you have heard so far. There is a thread I started HERE

that is for comments & questions about my work.

Christopher Schlegel

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That was all very easy for me having played for years.  I can't sing very well, but that never stopped me.  I've been singing in original & cover bands for years also.  The only glich was learning Italian enough to sing it "properly".  But I only had to do 1 semester of that.  The only music class I got a B in.  Shucks.
Yeah, singing italian is a pain in the ass, because I nothing about the language. Some of the vowel combinations seem unatural, but ultimately I am progressing quite well. I am using Vaccai's method book for baritone, which is suiting me farely well asides from having to transcribe all most all the music in lower keys. <_<

You really need to hear Eliot Fisk, man.  Really.

You can go to his Eliot Fisk Homepage

& hear samples of his playing or even buy one of his CDs from Eliot Fisk Paganini Caprices CD through cdbaby.com

Which I was surprised to find since they are also my web vendor.

I have a transcription of his arrangement of the 5th somewhere in my home office/studio.  I will find it & send you a copy if you wish.  The cdbaby.com page offers that piece as one of the samples.  That guy is amazing.

Wow that is very inspirational, especially because it sounds like he is fingerpicking everything! I would really appreciate it if you could send me a copy of that transcription. I am working of a tab, and the sheet music, and I am finding a hard time with some of the fingerings. I would love to see someone elses perspective on it. This is my first time working something out like this, and over all it is going along quite well. Very nice stuff man!

Thank you for listening & responding favorably.  I am glad you have enjoyed what you have heard so far.  There is a thread I started HERE

that is for comments & questions about my work.

Christopher Schlegel

I will definetely check it out!

thanks again,

I.S.L

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  • 2 weeks later...
I have started posting Music Theory Issues in my musician friend's forum...

The site has moved from that old address to this new one:

New Music Theory Forum Web Address

My guitar examples are still here:

Music Theory Page

Note: these are links to sites outside the Objectivism Forum. They are not commerical sites. Simply sites set up to discuss/work on music theory.

Thanks.

Christopher Schlegel

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The site has moved from that old address to this new one:

New Music Theory Forum Web Address

My guitar examples are still here:

Music Theory Page

Note: these are links to sites outside the Objectivism Forum.  They are not commerical sites.  Simply sites set up to discuss/work on music theory.

Thanks.

Christopher Schlegel

Thanks man!

I just bookmarked you'r forums as well, and will definetely be checking that out, as well as the theory site again. BTW, your theory site was really helpful. I have since been implementing the 7ths in my blues improvising. I just put together a couple real tight blues mix CDs to jam over, and I noticed that those notes work very well! Thanks again, as I know have another piece of information to enhance my playing that will be with me forever... :nuke:

I will definetely check out the counterpoint examples as well. The songs I create generally use a good amount of counterpoint already, but I don't really know the theory behind counterpoint yet. I just create melodies that sound good on top of eachother. I definetely would like to know why they sound good.

Also, my 5th caprice is going quite well. I have most of the song down, and can play most of the parts at 100 bpm at 16th notes. I have been doing alot of sweeping work, and can bang out a good amount of the minor and major arp shapes at 125 bpm now (triplets). So I have been improving quite much recently. I have been getting alot of practice time in. On the weekends, since I don't have to work, I am getting in about 20 hours of practice :dough:

Anyways, I haven't been posting much because of conflicts I am having with certain members of this site who obviously have more knowledge of Objectivism than me, and seem to talk down to people who don't agree with every aspect of the philosophy. I am studying the philosophy quite hard, but since I don't know it very thoroughly yet, I can't say I agree with everything. So I have chosen to browse this site and not really post much untill I get a better personal understanding of the philosophy. I just wanted to post this to let you know that your help has been greatly appreciated, and useful!

I.W.S.L

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Thanks man!  ...BTW, your theory site was really helpful. I have since been implementing the 7ths in my blues improvising.

You're welcome. I am glad you found it valuable.

I definetely would like to know why they sound good.

That is very good thinking.

Also, my 5th caprice is going quite well.

Excellent. Did you get the Fisk transcriptions? I sent them a while ago...

Anyways, I haven't been posting much because of conflicts I am having with certain members of this site who obviously have more knowledge of Objectivism than me, and seem to talk down to people who don't agree with every aspect of the philosophy. I am studying the philosophy quite hard, but since I don't know it very thoroughly yet,  I can't say I agree with everything. So I have chosen to browse this site and not really post much untill I get a better personal understanding of the philosophy.

Take your time to read all the Objectivist material & think carefully about it. A solid philosophical foundation is crucial in supporing your benevolent sense of life & ethusiasm/passion for beautiful music.

I have seen some members of this board taking the hard line in defending Rand & Objectivism. Remember, they are probably doing this because they care deeply about it & (possibly) they care enough to respond directly to you (even if only to correct you). Also, remember that the mainstream culture of the entire world is AGAINST Rand & Objectivism. Rand has been misunderstood, misinterpreted, misrepresented, outright lied about, etc. in so many ways that it is sometimes difficult NOT to take the hard line in defending the pursuit of philosophical truth passionately.

Keep studying!

I just wanted to post this to let you know that your help has been greatly appreciated, and useful!

Great. You are welcome. & you can always PM me.

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Excellent.  Did you get the Fisk transcriptions?  I sent them a while ago...
No, I have not received the Fisk transcriptions. :worry: I would like to see them, but it is not a big deal. I am going off the violin sheet music, and just working out the fingerings myself. The original tabs I was using had very illogical fingerings. When playing something at such an intense speed I like to use the the easiest fingerings possible, and what's easy for me, might not be easy for the next person and vice versa.

Take your time to read all the Objectivist material & think carefully about it.  A solid philosophical foundation is crucial in supporing your benevolent sense of life & ethusiasm/passion for beautiful music.

I totally agree, and these are my prime motivations for studying Objectivism. Where as I used to look at the music making experiance as being spiritual, I know see it as one of the most intensely rational experiances possible for a human. When we are creating music, we are witnessing beauty few people will ever have the chance to experiance. I find that the harder I train, the more intense the feeling of making music is. I absolute love that. :lol:

I have seen some members of this board taking the hard line in defending Rand & Objectivism.  Remember, they are probably doing this because they care deeply about it & (possibly) they care enough to respond directly to you (even if only to correct you). So, remember that the mainstream culture of the entire world is AGAINST Rand & Objectivism.  Rand has been misunderstood, misinterpreted, misrepresented, outright lied about, etc. in so many ways that it is sometimes difficult NOT to take the hard line in defending the pursuit of philosophical truth passionately.

Keep studying!

Great.  You are welcome.  & you can always PM me.

This is very true, but also one of the few things that deters me from the philosophy; particularly the bolded statement. I see many people that are so passionate about this philosophy that they have closed their minds to any dissenting statements that are made about the philosophy - regardless of any evidence that disagree. I, however, don't ever see my active mind closing off the potential for some disagreement in the philosophy anytime soon. I am amazed at how many Objectivists just look the other way at evidence that disagrees with the philosophy.

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Again: Did you get the Fisk transcriptions? I sent you links via the OO.net forum email option.

I see many people that are so passionate about this philosophy that they have closed their minds to any dissenting statements that are made about the philosophy - regardless of any evidence that disagree. I, however, don't ever see my active mind closing off the potential for some disagreement in the philosophy anytime soon. I am amazed at how many Objectivists just look the other way at evidence that disagrees with the philosophy.

You have evidence that some part of Objectivism is wrong? Was this part of a discussion in another thread? Could you point me to it? I don't usually read, follow, or post in many areas except aesthetics. Whenever I have looked around I see that other, more qualified individuals are properly answering questions related to other areas of Objectivism & philosophy in general. I am knowledgable about it, but I don't have an unlimited amount of time & this is a division of labor society! As well as (thankfully) a division of labor forum.

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