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What kind of music do you enjoy?

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Who is you favourite band(s)?

Mine are: Metallica, Led Zepplen, the Doors, AC/DC and Guns n Roses.

There is already a thread in here on Favorite Music, this one:

Favorite Music

You should have put this in that thread instead of starting another one.

Those bands are awful! I like music such as Mozart, Dvorak, and this Arcanum CD I have, and CD itself does not say whom it was written by, and I cant find the cover, but its rather good. This sort of music is uplifting, vibrant, has some complexity and makes me feel better, that stuff just depresses me these days.

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There is already a thread in here on Favorite Music, this one:

Favorite Music

You should have put this in that thread instead of starting another one.

Those bands are awful! I like music such as Mozart, Dvorak, and this Arcanum CD I have, and CD itself does not say whom it was written by, and I cant find the cover, but its rather good. This sort of music is uplifting, vibrant, has some complexity and makes me feel better, that stuff just depresses me these days.

Because I didn't know there was one. Also I would of preffered this stay a seperate thread of mine, not get almagamated the way it has.

I think they way posts here get moved without first talking to their poster and/or notifying them first is rude and immoral.

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Yipes. I never did provide a link to the Coheed and Cambria videos.

www.coheedandcambria.com

You can find the videos in the media section.

I really like Coheed. You should check out their earlier album (Second Stage Turbine Blade).

Their new album (Good Apollo I'm Burning Star IV: From Fear Through The Eyes of Madness Volume I) is also really really great.

I really love In Keeping Secrets of Silent Earth : 3.

Edited by Tryptonique

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Their new album (Good Apollo I'm Burning Star IV: From Fear Through The Eyes of Madness Volume I) is also really really great.

Time for me to get to Best Buy, then. They certainly have interesting album names. Of course, I'm still working on my King Crimson and Yes collection.

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Belle and Sebastian are probably my favourite band; beautifully simple music, with an innocence bordering on childishness. I mainly listen to modern indie; The Decemberists, Sleater-Kinney, Modest Mouse, Mars Volta, The Arcade Fire, New Pornographers etc, as well as older stuff like Joy Division, Velvet Underground, Brian Eno and the like. In other words, pitchforkmedia tends to be my music bible :lol:

I'm not a huge classical fan but I like a few pieces here and there; Beethoven is good, as is Stravinsky's Wrath of Spring, Rachmaninov, Tchaikovsky, and a few others. The opening movement of Richard Strauss - Also Sprach Zarathustra is one of my favourite pieces of music ever.

In a night club enviornment you cant beat good electronica, mainly melodic trance and progressive house. But its not something I particularlly enjoy listening to in my room, or on a portable audio player. Delerium - Silence, as commercial and overplayed as it is, is probably my favourite song ever. I dont really single out individual bands/DJs when it comes to this type of music though.

Edited by Hal

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Beethoven is not good...Beethoven is GREAT!!! The BEST....EVER!!! :P

He's awesome. I'm learning Moonlight Sonata on the ivories right now. I can't wait till I get to the last part, where the piece is electrifying. If I can play it, that is.

Having said that I'd probably place Mozart as the greatest ever. Some of his symphonies are unbelievable integrations, especially his last few.

That's "Rite of Spring" but, ironically, your typo is a more accurately descriptive title! :alien:

:glare:

I think when it was performed in Paris the first time a riot ensued. The audience thought they were being ripped off.

I have wide and eclectic taste in music, which probably tells you I don't know that much about it.

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My favorite new band is Death Cab for Cutie. I love their song "Soul Meets Body".
That's awesome! I'm going to their concert this Friday. I love their music, but not that particular song. I'm partial to Summer Skin, Brothers On A Hotel Bed, and Stable Song. Transatlanticism and We Have the Facts and We're Voting Yes are also awesome cd's.

Zak

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Beethoven is not good...Beethoven is GREAT!!! The BEST....EVER!!! B)

That's "Rite of Spring" but, ironically, your typo is a more accurately descriptive title! :P

AHAHA! That literally made me laugh out loud.

I've been listening to something I suggest you all pick up:

Richard Strauss's Alpine symphony. absolutely beautiful.

I think when it was performed in Paris the first time a riot ensued. The audience thought they were being ripped off.

Now THAT was something to riot about. What the hell happened to france between then and now?

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I find, for the first time in my life, that the question is difficult for me to answer. This, what was previously one of the simplest questions that I could have been asked. Soon after I began to really integrate reason into my life on the fundamental level that studying Objectivist philosophy requires, which is only recently, my artistic interests started to change. Where I was previously stuck in a sort of dark little 'intellectual oubliette,' created by the manner in which my personal brand of Logical Positivism totally amputated metaphysics and ethics, and subsequently any real sense of purpose, meaning, justification, truth, value, and self-confidence (et cetera), my taste in music was overwhelmingly dystopian, cynical, and/or faux-militant-chic in nature. Most of the list is relatively obscure; I won't waste your time by rambling off the three hundred some-odd Industrial, Post-Industrial, Martial/Neoclassical, Post-Punk, Darkwave, Power-Electronics, Rhythmic Noise, Apocalyptic Folk and EBM bands that I enjoy less by the day, but perhaps the following short summary might give some of you a general idea.

Joy Division

Bauhaus

Death in June

Skinny Puppy

Der Blutsharch

Wumpscut

Black Tape for a Blue Girl

Brighter Death Now

Control/Exsanguate

Lyica

Navicon Torture Technologies

Laibach

Unto Ashes

Sedaye Marg

Einsturzende Neubauten

Wolfsheim

Suicide Commando

Nine Inch Nails

Velvet Acid Christ

Mephisto Walz

...

The only thing that hasn't really changed is my appreciation of electronic (computer and synth-based) composition in and of itself, which stems, I believe, from my strong valuing and appreciation of new technology. I expect that I'll run across something that fits my new tastes eventually; as of the moment, there is nothing that I would call 'a favorite' amidst what I dislike or am increasingly indifferent to.

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There is a composer that I enjoy listening to, who is also a well known German philosopher, of which most of the board may already be well aquainted with his literary works, but not yet his musical compositions. This particular composer that I am speaking of is Friedrich Nietzsche. I came across his mature years compositions (Vol. 2) and am very anxious to hear his earlier compositions (Vol. 1). My favorite composition in Vol. 2 is Eine Slyvesternacht, which is also one of my favorites in my entire collection of music. I have read that when Nietzsche later lost his sanity, he would listen to these compositions.

I have not seen anyone mention my favorite violinist, Anne-sophie Mutter. I have seen Diana Krall noted by some of the posters here. I have been watching her Live In Paris DVD quite often on my laptop while I read "Of Human Bondage", by Someset Maugham.

~Steve~

"He felt like a man who has leaned on a stick, and finds himself forced suddenly to walk without assistance."

"From old habit, he unconciously thanked God that he no longer believed in him."

both from "Of Human Bondage", by Somerset Maugham

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Who is you favourite band(s)?

Mine are: Metallica, Led Zepplen, the Doors, AC/DC and Guns n Roses.

I like two of your selections, and I wouldn't worry about anyone bumbugging them.

I would challenge anyone to name a band that has done anywhere near the songs that Led Zepplin has done. Where is there in modern "popular" music anything to match Stairway to Heaven or Kashmir (to name only two)? I ask that in two senses: 1: actual skill in playing 2: arrangement and production ability. Hell, three: the ability NOT to come up with something that is snoringly autobiographical.

AC/DC is probably the easiest band to play from a purely technical point of view. And, yes, they have, in essence, come out with the same record 19 times in a row. But why? And why is it so popular to this day? Because they do (and are named after) the essence of rock and roll. Energy, frenetic energy, strength, power, "can do, will do" music. No matter the senselessness of their lyrics, the essence they have always had is marching over mountains one step a piece (listen to Jailbait or Back in Black for a clue). You can't help but to feel that foot start to tap and want to take on a life of its own. Also, I love their frontman Brian Johnson, He's 58, and he is still trying to rip that through his chest-no matter what. Gotta love it.

Edited by Thoyd Loki

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I would challenge anyone to name a band that has done anywhere near the songs that Led Zepplin has done. Where is there in modern "popular" music anything to match Stairway to Heaven or Kashmir (to name only two)? I ask that in two senses: 1: actual skill in playing 2: arrangement and production ability.

With regard to production, I offer these comments. I lack the knowledge to make these assertions as fact, so for now I will keep them in the realm of preference. I'm not approaching this an argument, just a friendly chat.

I far prefer much of the modern pop and rock production over that of any era I've ever heard. To me, the sound is much clearer and crisper. I offer as an example the intro and verses of Staind's "Right Here." (Note: I do not like most of Staind's material, nor do I like the other sections of this song in particular.) I also think that instruments blend together better. In the last few years, and particularly the last two or so, I have noticed that clean and dirty guitars together sound almost angelic. Three Doors Down and Shinedown come to mind as examples of this, as does the second verse of the aforementioned Staind song, in which distorted power chords spice up the background and create a fuller, darker sound. (I seem to remember them being panned left, but I'm not positive about that.)

With regard to your challenge, do you wish to limit that to popular music? If not, and if you haven't listened already, I think you might enjoy a listen to Dream Theater's "Erotomania." Some Dream Theater material is too wacky for me, but I love this instrumental. The short guitar solo section about 60-70% of the way through is gorgeous, almost triumphant.

Further with regard to your challenge, if you do not wish to limit it to popular rock, then Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, and many others are far more technically proficient than Jimmy Page. If you do wish to limit it to popular rock, then I offer Carter Beauford (Dave Matthews Band) and Danny Carey (Tool) as examples of drummers I think far exceed John Bonham.

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With regard to production, I offer these comments. I lack the knowledge to make these assertions as fact, so for now I will keep them in the realm of preference. I'm not approaching this an argument, just a friendly chat.

I far prefer much of the modern pop and rock production over that of any era I've ever heard. To me, the sound is much clearer and crisper. I offer as an example the intro and verses of Staind's "Right Here." (Note: I do not like most of Staind's material, nor do I like the other sections of this song in particular.) I also think that instruments blend together better. In the last few years, and particularly the last two or so, I have noticed that clean and dirty guitars together sound almost angelic. Three Doors Down and Shinedown come to mind as examples of this, as does the second verse of the aforementioned Staind song, in which distorted power chords spice up the background and create a fuller, darker sound. (I seem to remember them being panned left, but I'm not positive about that.)

With regard to your challenge, do you wish to limit that to popular music? If not, and if you haven't listened already, I think you might enjoy a listen to Dream Theater's "Erotomania." Some Dream Theater material is too wacky for me, but I love this instrumental. The short guitar solo section about 60-70% of the way through is gorgeous, almost triumphant.

Further with regard to your challenge, if you do not wish to limit it to popular rock, then Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, and many others are far more technically proficient than Jimmy Page. If you do wish to limit it to popular rock, then I offer Carter Beauford (Dave Matthews Band) and Danny Carey (Tool) as examples of drummers I think far exceed John Bonham.

First, I think Danny Carey is an awesome drummer, and Tool is one band I will make a huge exception for. They do some amazing stuff. I love Stealth from Anima, that is the creativeness that is largely missing nowadays.

I am not going to debate the technical proficiency of individual guitarists. Only to say that those you mentioned along with Jimmy Page are head and tails above the gamut of modern tuned down "mush" guitar players nowadays. They all take Metallica lessons and call themselves guitar players. It is repetitive, boring, and destroys any potential a song may have.

But, taking musicians as a whole, be they guitar players, drummers or singers, I have one qualification. They have to subordinate themselves to the song. Meaning, that I listen to a song for its totality, and I only will focus on a particular instrument or player with this end in mind. That is, to admire how that instrument fits and makes whole a song.

That leads into the topic of production. I do not know what word would serve justice here. Or maybe I am using the right word and the modern songs just happen to suck anyway. Maybe the word I am looking for is atmosphere. Taking Kashmir as an example. It has an overall sound that is inchy and creeping and Plant sounds like he is falling into a well at points. It was its own particular air that is remembered and not duplicated. Everything else nowadays has the: da-nu-nu-nu-nu "I F****** hate you!" It is using depressing, myopically high-school social (anti-social), embarassingly autobilographical, and standard.

In an all round fashion they take you nowhere, and inspire you to nothing much like a lifeless naturalistic novel. I think a lot of the technology is being wasted. Do you know I know at least ten peole who "play" instruments and do not even know the major scale, or read music, or even have an ear?

And, yes, I agree the modern sounds are clearer and crisper. But, for the most part, I'd like to cover that up with a thick layer of static.

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Only to say that those you mentioned along with Jimmy Page are head and tails above the gamut of modern tuned down "mush" guitar players nowadays. They all take Metallica lessons and call themselves guitar players. It is repetitive, boring, and destroys any potential a song may have.

Agreed, and I'd like to add to this. Some modern guys can play but really don't. On a rare occasion, I find myself surprised by someone I never would have thought could play. Some years ago I watched footage from a drum festival in which White Zombie's drummer (Tempesta?) absolutely tore it up. I'm far from being familiar with Zombie's stuff, but the few songs I remember had nothing dazzling on the drums. What the hell?

On the whole, though I'd agree that most of the guys probably just can't play. Most of the leads are just pathetic. Matchbox 20 probably had a couple hundred grand to record their first album, and that joke of a "solo" on "Real World" was the best they could do? And the rhythm parts are nothing to write home about either. One reason among many that I like John Mayer is that his rhythm guitar parts are usually pretty interesting.

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I would challenge anyone to name a band that has done anywhere near the songs that Led Zepplin has done. Where is there in modern "popular" music anything to match Stairway to Heaven or Kashmir (to name only two)? I ask that in two senses: 1: actual skill in playing 2: arrangement and production ability. Hell, three: the ability NOT to come up with something that is snoringly autobiographical.

RUSH-

In particular

Tom Sawyer- I mean, come on on the first beat you're hooked into that rhythm. "A modern day warrior, mean, mean stride, today's Tom Sawyer, mean mean pride!" This piece in itself, in all catagories trumphs both Stairway and Kashmir (particularly in the drumming dept, which happens to be MY specialty).

Something for Nothing- Brilliant hard rock with Objectivist lyrics. What more could you possibly want? My sig comes from that piece.

For your story telling ability-

2112 - Basically "Anthem (though, another good Rush song)" with a different ending. Seven sections, some following classical format, and Amazing lyrics (and "Acknowledgement to the genius of Ayn Rand.").

Red Barchetta - A futuristic story about a time when individual rights are gone because of too many laws, and a young man who takes his Uncle's old, now illegal, car out for a drive and escapes the cops. The guitar riff in the beginning with the simple, yet beautiful, hi-hat rhythm just brings you into the story (or in the passenger seat.)

"Losing It" - The keyboard and the violin at the beginning are so moving, I almost cry everytime I listen to it. Certainly makes me want to make the most of my youth.

I think Neil Peart is probably THE best lyricist out there. He just knows how to put a string of words together like no one else, and then make them applicable to a musical piece. "The Trees" is a perfect example of perfect poetry made perfect lyrics. He's also not a half shabby drummer as well. Geddy Lee is one of the best bassists out there, and I'd definitely put Alex Lifeson up there with Jimmy Page in guitar ability.

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RUSH-

In particular

Tom Sawyer- I mean, come on on the first beat you're hooked into that rhythm. "A modern day warrior, mean, mean stride, today's Tom Sawyer, mean mean pride!" This piece in itself, in all catagories trumphs both Stairway and Kashmir (particularly in the drumming dept, which happens to be MY specialty).

Something for Nothing- Brilliant hard rock with Objectivist lyrics. What more could you possibly want? My sig comes from that piece.

For your story telling ability-

2112 - Basically "Anthem (though, another good Rush song)" with a different ending. Seven sections, some following classical format, and Amazing lyrics (and "Acknowledgement to the genius of Ayn Rand.").

Red Barchetta - A futuristic story about a time when individual rights are gone because of too many laws, and a young man who takes his Uncle's old, now illegal, car out for a drive and escapes the cops. The guitar riff in the beginning with the simple, yet beautiful, hi-hat rhythm just brings you into the story (or in the passenger seat.)

"Losing It" - The keyboard and the violin at the beginning are so moving, I almost cry everytime I listen to it. Certainly makes me want to make the most of my youth.

I think Neil Peart is probably THE best lyricist out there. He just knows how to put a string of words together like no one else, and then make them applicable to a musical piece. "The Trees" is a perfect example of perfect poetry made perfect lyrics. He's also not a half shabby drummer as well. Geddy Lee is one of the best bassists out there, and I'd definitely put Alex Lifeson up there with Jimmy Page in guitar ability.

Yeah, my first sentence that you quoted doesn't make it obvious, but the rest does, I am talking modern bands, the "in vogue for this micro-second". So, sorry, you are not going to get me in a "band-fight". :)

I would say that Rush and Zep are pretty even on talent, till you get to drumming. I have to give it to Neil Peart. I mean, come on!

Personally I don't make too much of what is being said (to an extent) but how, and how it fits in a song. "Objectivist lyrics" don't really matter to me one way or another (if I really need to, I could sing Galt's speech in the shower - I can hold a tune, boys) my morning song is BnB - although I guess that's not a negative song. Besides, I liked Rush long before I heard of Ayn Rand, or knew what Geddy was talking about.

BTW - You left out Limelight. Shame on you.

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Yeah, my first sentence that you quoted doesn't make it obvious, but the rest does, I am talking modern bands, the "in vogue for this micro-second". So, sorry, you are not going to get me in a "band-fight". :thumbsup:

Hmmm...true. I would say "Tool" is really the only one that comes to mind, but even then....I have an extremely hard time giving it to them. I've heard good things about DillingerEscapePlan, but I've never listened to them. But, yeah, all the rest of the good music is underground or unknown.

I would say that Rush and Zep are pretty even on talent, till you get to drumming. I have to give it to Neil Peart. I mean, come on!

Though, I know plenty of drummers who'll disagree with even that. I just like the clean, tighter feel of Peart over Bonham, but they both could rock.

Personally I don't make too much of what is being said (to an extent) but how, and how it fits in a song. "Objectivist lyrics" don't really matter to me one way or another (if I really need to, I could sing Galt's speech in the shower - I can hold a tune, boys) my morning song is BnB - although I guess that's not a negative song. Besides, I liked Rush long before I heard of Ayn Rand, or knew what Geddy was talking about.

Ha! I think it's a mix. The message of the piece should blend musically AND lyrically. It's interesting that my dad got me into BOTH Rush and Ayn Rand.

BTW - You left out Limelight. Shame on you.

Well, I could have gone on forever with pretty much all their songs. I just picked out the ones that stood out to me. Limelight is a great piece though. That entire album is, though, I do tend to find myself migrating to "Permanent Waves" more often than "Moving Pictures."

What do you think of Dave Matthews Band (on a purely musical level)?

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Oh, I wasn't knocking Bonham, he was one tight, drunk-ass, drummer. But Peart has skills that few (none?) in that genre have, he must have worked like an animal to play like he does. The drum track in Tom Sawyer is still one of the best I think. If you listen to that just for the drums, he is doing all kinds of things, all over the place, and keeping that beat deep in the pocket the whole time. I could actually sit here all night analyzing that drumming.

Moving Pictures will always be the best Rush album for me. When me and my childhood buddy first started doing music we had 3 albums that were our Holy Grail.

Those will always be "the perfect albums" for me.

Led Zepplin: Physical Graffiti

AC/DC: For Those About to Rock, We Salute You

Rush: Moving Pictures

You might not believe me, but I do not know any Dave Matthews that I know of. Unless they have one of those songs that everyone knows, and I don't realize that I do.

There is always music playing at my job, but I usually am tuned out.

I would give it to Tool, at least in the context or time they are competing in. Anima is a great album. Although I hope they try to cover some different territory next time. The band is very talented, and Maynard could handle whatever he wanted - except, I guess, a happy tune.

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I would give it to Tool, at least in the context or time they are competing in. Anima is a great album. Although I hope they try to cover some different territory next time. The band is very talented, and Maynard could handle whatever he wanted - except, I guess, a happy tune.

I disagree. I got some pretty positive vibes from their last album, Lateralus. Certainly "Parabol" and "Parabola" have some great lyrics. (I love that part where Maynard screams "Alive, I!", and the band drops that evil groove Jedi-style!)

"The Patient" is a good lyrical companion when my work (often necessarily) involves highly time-consuming, yet minimally-yielding, duties. Maynard might have some sarcastic, hidden meaning behind these songs, but I don't see him as a sardonic songwriter; he seems pretty honest about his feelings.

Tool's one of my favorites, and I've read quotes from the band that their next album is going to be "heavy". What, the other stuff wasn't? :D

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